Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Introduction To VPS Or Virtual Private Server Mohd Sohail 20/05/2018 - 8:31pm
Story Raspberry Pi Series Part 4: Ten Raspberry Pi Linux Distributions To Get You Going In 2018 Mohd Sohail 20/05/2018 - 6:38pm
Story Plasma 5.12.5, Applications 18.04.1 and Frameworks 5.46.0 by KDE now available in Chakra Roy Schestowitz 1 20/05/2018 - 2:04pm
Story Linux 4.16.10, 4.14.42, and 4.9.101 Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 2:03pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 12:16pm
Story Steam Controller Kernel Driver Is Landing In The Linux 4.18 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 11:40am
Story Video of AsteroidOS Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 11:38am
Story KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 11:24am
Story FreeOffice 2018 Release is Seamlessly Compatible With MS Office on Linux itsfoss 20/05/2018 - 8:35am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 8:30am

Games: Steam, Retro, FOX n FORESTS

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Steam Link Android app is now out, works quite well so far

    Valve have officially put out a beta version of their new Steam Link Android app, which allows you to stream games from your Linux PC to your favourite device. As expected (and as Valve previously confirmed to us), it fully supports a Linux PC as the host device.

    As a reminder, you will need to update your Steam Controller's firmware in the Steam Beta Client. As we wrote about before, the Steam Controller was recently updated to support Bluetooth Low Energy mode in preparation for this. The Steam Link app is also compatible with a number of other Bluetooth pads as well.

  • The latest Steam Client update is out, breaks gamepads in Big Picture Mode on Linux & SteamOS

    The latest Steam Client update has left beta, bringing the Bluetooth Low Energy mode to everyone with the Steam Controller amongst other things. It also, sadly, broke other gamepad support in Big Picture mode.

    There's this bug report on Valve's GitHub, which has been open since May 9th. That only mentions PS3 controllers, but there's other bug reports open for other gamepads. I've tested it myself, with the Steam Controller working as normal and all other gamepads are broken on Linux in Big Picture Mode.

  • Retro-inspired arcade racer Slipstream to release May 21st, developed on Linux

    This is great, not long after the rather good release of Horizon Chase Turbo, we have another retro-inspired racer with Slipstream. This one is very interesting, since it was developed on Linux.

  • Season swapping action platformer FOX n FORESTS is now out

    FOX n FORESTS [Official Site] is another retro-inspired action platformer, although it does have a slight twist with the season changing mechanic.

    We're certainly not short on action platformers, especially retro inspired titles. To be fair though, there's not actually a great deal of them that are worth playing. Sure, there's a couple of excellent titles, but there's also a lot that just aren't any good.

  • ,

Events: KDE GSoC, PyCon, LinuxFest NorthWest

Filed under
OSS
  • Welcome Our New Google Summer of Code Students

    KDE Student Programs is happy to present our 2018 Google Summer of Code students to the KDE Community.

    Welcome Abhijeet Sharma, Aman Kumar Gupta, Amit Sagtani, Andrey Cygankov, Andrey Kamakin, Anmol Gautam, Caio Jordão de Lima Carvalho, Chinmoy Ranjan Pradhan, Csaba Kertesz, Demetrio Carrara, Dileep Sankhla, Ferencz Kovács, Furkan Tokac, Gun Park, Iván Yossi Santa María González, Kavinda Pitiduwa Gamage, Mahesh S Nair, Tarek Talaat, Thanh Trung Dinh, Yihang Zhou, and Yingjie Liu!

  • PyCon US 2018 Wrapup

    I attended PyCon US in Cleveland over the last week. Here’s a quick summary of the conference.

    Aside from my usual “you should go to PyCon” admonition, I’d like to suggest writing a summary like this every time you visit a conference. It’s a nice way to share what you found valuable with others, and also to evaluate the utility of attending the conference.

    I barely write a lick of Python anymore, so I mostly attend PyCon for the people and for the ideas. ome themes are common to PyCon: data science, machine learning, education, and core language. Of course, there’s always a smattering of other topics, too.

    During the poster session, I saw a poster on the Python Developers Survey 2017 from JetBrains. One statistic that surprised me: 50% of respondents use Python primarily for data analysis.

  • LinuxFest NorthWest 2018 Recap

    Nineteen years in, LinuxFest Northwest is the original community LinuxFest and is easily the lowest-stress event on my calendar. While Bellingham, Washington may seem like an odd place to host a conference, it is actually the natural end of the line for tech workers who migrate up the West coast from Silicon Valley in search of an affordable place to live and work where you can kayak after work. This lifestyle draw has created quite the tech scene in the Bellingham area and its proximity to the Canadian border makes LFNW an attractive destination for Vancouver, B.C. community members. Some attendees traveled from as far away as Germany and Taiwan, making this an international event despite its remote location. If you have never been to an LFNW, I encourage you to consider attending the 20th anniversary one in 2019!

Vim 8.1 is available!

Filed under
Software

Vim 8.1 is a minor release, a few new features have been added since Vim 8.0. A lot of bugs have been fixed, documentation was updated, etc.

Read more

Ubuntu 18.10 Features: New Theme, Android Integration, Better Power Consumption

Filed under
Ubuntu

As you can imagine, Ubuntu 18.10 will come with a lot of new features and improvements, some of which Canonical planned for a long time but didn't manage to implement them in the recently released Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system due to its long-term support status and the focus on stability and reliability.

So, like any other 9-month supported release, Ubuntu 18.10 will be a testbed for Canonical to try new things. Some of these include the ability to unlock your Ubuntu desktop with a fingerprint reader, integration with the KDE Connect Android app by default through GS Connect, a new installer, and a new system theme.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 18.10 Aims To Lower Power Use, Default To New Desktop Theme

System76’s Oryx Pro Laptop Targets AI Developers

Filed under
News

System76’s latest laptop Oryx Pro is a beast in terms of configuration and it focuses on AI and Machine Learning developers. Read about the specifications and pricing
Read more

Security: Updates, EFAIL, DHCP, Ubuntu’s Snap Store

Filed under
Security

SD Times Open Source Project of the Week: Bazel

Filed under
Google
OSS

The project is led by a core group of contributors and Googlers, and managed by the community. The group of core contributors is self-managing and added by two supporting votes from other core contributors.

According to Google, some parts of Bazel will never make it into open source because it integrates with Google-specific technology or the company plans to get rid of those features in the future.

The Angular team has announced plans to migrate its build scripts with Bazel to get faster and more reliable incremental builds. As of Angular 6, Angular itself is now built with Bazel, according to Stephen Fluin, developer advocate for Angular. “Bazel is the build system that Google and the Angular team use to keep incremental builds under 2 seconds,” the team wrote in a post.

Bazel is already being used by companies such as Asana, Ascend.io, Databricks, Dropbox, Etsy, Google, Huawei, LingoChamp, Pinterest and Uber. Open-source projects using Bazel include Angular, Deepmind Lab, GRPC, gVisor, Kubernetes, Sonnet, TensorFlow and Trunk.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Addressing the Complexity of Big Data with Open Source

    Simple software is a thing of the past. Think about it: No program out there is created in a vacuum. Every program uses libraries, has run-time dependencies, interacts with operational environments, and reacts to human inputs. Free and opensource software, as a creative free-market approach to software development, provides more than one solution for every challenge. There are multiple compilers, operating systems, statistics packages (known today as machine learning), test frameworks, orchestration solutions, and so on. Each project moves at its own speed, releasing new features and adding new attributes. Imagine for a second that there is a need to combinea few of these complicated projects into a meta-complex system. It sounds quite sophisticated, doesn't it?

  • Review: Icinga enterprise-grade, open-source network monitoring that scales

    Continuing our quest for robust, enterprise-grade open source network monitoring, we tested Icinga Core 2 (version 2.8.1) and the stand-alone Icinga Web 2 interface. Created in 2009 as a fork of the Nagios network monitoring tool, Icinga has come a long way.

    We found Icinga to be a powerful monitoring tool with many great features. The Core install is straightforward and basic monitoring is easy with either pre-configured templates or plugins. However, we discovered that the Web install is a bit more complicated and could stand to be streamlined.

  • DigitalBits Foundation Networks Blockchain Companies In Open Source Consortium

    The DigitalBits Foundation is an open source project that provides development resources, infrastructure, events and education via a global transaction network and protocol. Loyalty program operators are able to tokenize their respective loyalty points as digital assets on this decentralized network and users can trade these various digital assets on-chain. DigitalBits latest addition is a partnership with Cogeco Peer 1, a global provider of business-to-business products and services.

    The Foundation’s vision is to see the DigitalBits blockchain help solve portability, security and liquidity issues with certain digital assets, such as Loyalty and Rewards programs, and help generate additional value for consumers, businesses and certain charitable organizations.

    Al Burgio, the founder and CEO, talked with Block Tribune about the organization.

  • How Will U.S. Tensions With China Affect Open Source Networking?

    There’s been a lot of drama in 2018 concerning the Chinese vendors Huawei and ZTE and their ability to do business in the United States. The fate of these companies seems inextricably tied to larger geo-political events.

    ZTE has been banned for seven years from buying components from U.S. companies for its products. And members of the U.S. Congress have attacked Huawei’s ability to do business in the country, claiming the vendor’s equipment poses a national security risk.

  • [Mozilla] SQL Style Guide
  • Lemonade introduces 'open-source' policy
  • Open source code is ubiquitous and so are many vulnerabilities [Ed: Black Duck again. Microsoft-connected FUD.]
  • How to make open source work for your company [Ed: Mac Asay claims "Microsoft's miraculous conversion from pariah to messiah in the open source world". He spreads a lie. Still trying to get a job there?]
  • Code & Supply is here for Pittsburgh’s ‘awesome’ software community

    The 2016 Abstractions conference drew software professionals from all over the world — many of them big names in the field, such as Larry Wall, who invented the Perl programming language; Richard Stallman, founder of the Free Software Foundation and creator of GNU; and Raffi Krikorian, formerly of Twitter and Uber — which was one of Reese’s goals when he first started hosting Code & Supply’s meetups.

  • Open Source Calculator Teaches us about Quality Documentation

    Graphing calculators are one of those funny markets that never seem to change. Standardized testing has created a primordial stew of regulatory capture in which ancient technology thrives at modern retail prices while changing little. The NumWorks calculator certainly isn’t the first competitor to challenge the Texas Instruments dynasty with a more modern interface (and a design from this decade), but behind it’s subtle color pops and elegant lines lies the real gem; a fantastically well documented piece of open source hardware. The last time we wrote about the NumWorks, it was to demonstrate a pretty wild hack that embedded an entire Pi Zero but it’s worth drawing attention to the calculator itself.

Starting With GNU/Linux and GNU/Linux on Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • A beginner’s guide to Linux

    The key difference is that Linux is open source. In the most simple terms, it just means that no one single person or corporation controls the code. Instead, the operating system is maintained by a dedicated group of developers from around the world. Anyone who is interested can contribute to the code and help check for errors. Linux is more than an operating system; it is a community.

  • Why Linux apps on Chromebooks are a really big deal (really!)

    It may have gotten lost in the shuffle of all the Android P news at Google's I/O conference last week, but fear not, dear friends: Chrome OS has definitely not been forgotten.

    Google's been making steady progress in advancing its Chromebook operating system over the past several months, particularly around its efforts to further align Android and Chrome OS and turn Chromebooks into all-purpose productivity machines and Android tablet replacements. Practically every week, in fact, there's some new and noteworthy feature being added into the platform (something we've talked about a great deal in my weekly newsletter as of late).

    And though it wasn't in the keynote, a massive new development did sneak its way into Chrome OS during I/O: the quietly announced ability for Chromebooks to run Linux apps as if they were native applications, without the need for any complex and security-defeating configurations. Linux app support is on its way to the Pixelbook to start — currently in that device's developer channel and likely becoming available much more broadly before long.

More Coverage of AsteroidOS 1.0

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • AsteroidOS is a Linux-based platform that may be the Wear OS alternative you were looking for

    A Linux-based smartwatch platform that could function as an alternative to Android Wear OS is now finally available for download.

  • AsteroidOS v1.0 Released Wearable Open Source Operating System

    After being in development for a number of years the first release of the new AsteroidOS wearable operating system has been released, providing alternative for Android Wear and supporting a wide variety of Android based smartwatches. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the first stable AsteroidOS v1.0 release which is now available to download.

    Asteroid OS 1.0 has been created to provide all the features you’d expect of a modern wearable including notifications, agenda, alarm clock, calculator, music remote control, settings customisations, a stopwatch, a timer, and a weather forecast app. The difference between this and other operating systems is that AsteroidOS open-source operating system for smartwatches.

  • Open source Android Wear alternative AsteroidOS released

    After more than three years of development, AsteroidOS has finally reached the version 1.0 milestone. This open source smartwatch OS is designed to offer Android Wear owners an alternative, especially for older watch models that have stopped receiving Wear OS updates.

  • Open-Source AsteroidOS Launches As Wear OS Alternative

    AsteroidOS is an open-source alternative to Google’s Wear OS that’s been in development for quite some time, and now owners of compatible smartwatches can finally compile the OS for themselves and give it a try. The official website has a detailed guide for how to compile and install the OS, and it’s already compatible with a range of popular modern and older smartwatches like the LG Watch Urbane and ASUS ZenWatch 2. At this stage, AsteroidOS is pretty basic, with only a few essential apps like a calculator and alarm clock on board. There are also a number of connectivity options, including multiple versions of Bluetooth in low-power mode. The real draw, however, is that the OS is completely opened up to developers, with an SDK already available and the whole project being entirely open-source.

Plasma 5.13 Beta

Filed under
KDE

Thursday, 17 May 2018. Today KDE unveils a beta release of Plasma 5.13.0.

Members of the Plasma team have been working hard to continue making Plasma a lightweight and responsive desktop which loads and runs quickly, but remains full-featured with a polished look and feel. We have spent the last four months optimising startup and minimising memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance and less memory consumption. Basic features like panel popups were optimised to make sure they run smoothly even on the lowest-end hardware. Our design teams have not rested either, producing beautiful new integrated lock and login screen graphics.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.13 Enters Beta with New Lock & Login Screens, Browser Integration

KDE Plasma 5.13 Beta Released With A Compelling Number Of Improvements

Microsoft-Connected FUD and EEE

Filed under
Microsoft

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Using Ansible Galaxy Roles in Ansible Playbook Bundles

    The Open Service Broker API standard aims to standardize how services (cloud, third-party, on-premise, legacy, etc) are delivered to applications running on cloud platforms like OpenShift. This allows applications to consume services the exact same way no matter on which cloud platform they are deployed. The service broker pluggable architecture enables admins to add third-party brokers to the platform in order to make third-party and cloud services available to the application developers directly from the OpenShift service catalog. As an example AWS Service Broker created jointly by Amazon and Red Hat, Azure Service Broker created by Microsoft and Helm Service Broker created by Google to allow consumption of AWS services, Azure services and Helm charts on Kubernetes and OpenShift. Furthermore, admins can create their own brokers in order to make custom services like provisioning an Oracle database on their internal Oracle RAC available to the developers through the service catalog.

  • Government, enterprise interest in Red Hat and open source sky rocketing

    A popular quote from Mohandas Gandhi graces most of the Red Hat Canada offices across the country: “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.”

    It’s been said that making money from something that’s given away for free is next to impossible, but Red Hat and its Canadian business has turned that assumption on its head and remains dedicated to the open source community.

  • Red Hat's CloudForms to slum it by wrangling boring old VMs

    Red Hat’s decided virtual servers ought not to be a standalone silo for much longer, so has created a “Virtualization Suite” that combines Red Hat Virtualization with the CloudForms tool it offers to manage OpenStack and cloud-native applications.

    CloudForms has been around for a while and offers administrators one app with which to manage and automate hybrid infrastructure. But Red Hat’s Virtualization (RHV) tools have remained their own little island.

  • Red Hat’s AI Strategy

    “The impact of AI will be visible in the software industry much sooner than the analog world, deeply affecting open source in general, as well as Red Hat, its ecosystem, and its userbase. This shift provides a huge opportunity for Red Hat to offer unique value to our customers. In this session, we’ll provide Red Hat’s general perspective on AI and how we are helping our customers benefit from AI.”

  • Microsoft and Red Hat Announce a Managed OpenShift Offering on Azure

Is GIMP’s 2.10 Release Catching up with Photoshop?

Filed under
GNU
Reviews

Of the many notable new features, GIMP 2.10 has ported most of its image processing capabilities to GEGL, a data flow based image processing framework that is free software (its source code is in GNOME git).

GEGL provides floating point processing and non-destructive image processing capabilities, “allowing high bit depth processing, multi-threaded and hardware accelerated pixel processing, and more”.

GIMP’s lack of multi-core processing has historically caused performance issues, which is a true deterrent in the graphics processing world.

Moreover, the program can now utilise parallel processing, which is a big deal for various reasons, namely, more efficient processor usage through use of multiple cores.

Read more

Choosing the right open source tool for movie project management

Filed under
OSS

One thing artists, engineers, and hackers share in common is their antipathy for management. So, when the time comes when we actually need project management, it comes as a painful growing experience.

For the Lunatics! animated open movie project, we started by using basic tools popular with open source software projects, like a version control system (Subversion), a wiki (MediaWiki), and a bug-tracker and online browser for the source code (Trac). This is viable for a team of a half-dozen people and an unhurried schedule on a volunteer project. But it quickly becomes unmanageable for larger teams and tighter schedules.

Read more

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Review: The Perfect Blend of Ubuntu and Budgie Desktop

Filed under
Reviews

Ubuntu Budgie is perhaps the most obscure Ubuntu flavor. Have a look at the main highlights and user experience of the new Ubuntu 18.04 Budgie release.
Read more

Games: Feral Interactive and Steam News

Filed under
Gaming

Graphics: Mesa 18.0.4 and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 18.0.4

    Mesa 18.0.4 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    r600 driver gets a fix for constant buffer boounds, which fixes rendering bugs
    in Trine and Witcher 1.

    Several fixes for RADV driver: fixes around alpha channel in Pre-Vega, fix in
    multisample image copies, and fixes around multilayer images in compute path.

    For the case of ANV/i965 drivers, also a couple of fixes, all of them around
    ISP. On top, there are a couple of fixes relative to code emission around 16-bit
    integers, and a a fix for a leak in blorp for Gen4 and Gen5.

    Speaking of leaks, there are also fixes for winsys/radeon/amdgpu and
    pipe-loader.gets a couple of patches to fix a couple of leaks.

    SPIR-V part gets a patch to apply OriginUpperLeft to FragCoord.

    Mesa core gets a couple of patches to fix error handling in
    get_framebuffer_parameteriv, and to add missing support for
    glFogiv(GL_FOG_DISTANCE_MODE_NV).

  • Mesa 18.0.4 Released With A Handful Of Bug Fixes

    Mesa 18.1 might be out this weekend but for those riding the Mesa 18.0 stable release series for now, Mesa 18.0.4 is the latest point release.

  • AMD Will Continue Maintaining Multiple Compute Stacks For Linux

    With the great shape that ROCm has been getting into recently for open-source Radeon GPU compute support on Linux including advancing OpenCL support, one might have rightfully assumed that was going to be their centralized compute stack moving forward. It turns out that their PAL-based compute stack will continue to be maintained too.

  • VC5 Gallium3D Driver Becomes V3D, Enabled By Default In Mesa

    What was developed as the VC5 Gallium3D driver is now renamed to V3D and enabled by default in new Mesa 18.2 builds.

    The Broadcom Video Core V driver that was already part of Mesa was renamed to V3D to match the name of the V3D DRM kernel driver. The VC5 to V3D renaming occurred since this driver is already supporting a VideoCore VC6 device, so the VC5 naming was no longer deemed appropriate.

  • VMware 13.3 X.Org Driver Brings DRI3 With Latest Mesa, X.Org Server 1.20 Support

    Usually X.Org DDX driver releases aren't too notable these days with most of the open-source Linux graphics innovations happening elsewhere in the stack, but for those using the VMware graphics virtualization support available through their different virtualization products, the xf86-video-vmware update out today is on the heavier side.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fantastic kernel patches and where to find them

    I've griped before about kernel development being scattered and spread about. A quick grep of MAINTAINERS shows over 200 git trees and even more mailing lists. Today's discussion is a partial enumeration of some common mailing lists, git trees and patchwork instances. You can certainly find some of this in the MAINTAINERS file.

  • Sprint Joins ORAN Alliance and Linux Foundation Networking Fund

    Sprint is becoming a member of the ORAN Alliance, formerly known as the xRAN Forum, and it is also joining the LF Networking Fund (LNF).

    The two moves signal the operator’s commitment to the open source world. It’s making these inroads prior to its planned merger with T-Mobile. The two companies announced earlier last month that they will merge. The deal, if approved, will close in early 2019.

  • Vulkan 1.1.75 Released With Many Issues Resolved

    It's been almost one month since the Vulkan 1.1.74 debut but now that's been succeeded by Vulkan 1.1.75.

    The Khronos Group has put out Vulkan 1.1.75 this morning as the newest revision to this graphics/compute API. The Vulkan 1.1.75 update doesn't introduce any new extensions, but there are a wide number of issues resolved -- as usual, mostly document clarifications about intended behavior and some fixes.

  • FreeOffice 2018 Release is Seamlessly Compatible With MS Office on Linux

    A few months after the release of the premium SoftMaker 2018 office suite, SoftMaker has just released the latest version of its free office suite, SoftMaker FreeOffice 2018.

    SoftMaker is a premium productivity suite and one of the most viable alternatives to Microsoft Office. FreeOffice is a stripped down version of SoftMaker premium with fewer features than the premium version. You can read about the difference between the features of SoftMaker and FreeOffice here.

  • Colony building sim Maia has a fresh update with a ton of polish & new fancy exterior rendering

    Maia [Official Site], from developer Simon Roth has just been updated with a pretty big update. There's a lot of polish in this update, literally so with a new floor cleaning robot.

    I'll be honest, Maia is one of those games that I've always had a bit of a love/hate relationship with. Mainly because I love the simulation in it and the insane levels of detail, but it has previously been a little on the buggy side. Thankfully, the developer is massively dedicated and each update really has improved the game dramatically. This update is no different, it's made a world of difference.

  • The first stage of removing loot crates from Robocraft is now live

    Robocraft, the free to play, build and battle game just got updated with the first stage planned in a series of updates to remove loot crates.

    With this first initial update, you can no longer buy item crates and you don't get a daily login item crate bonus. While you still get them in other parts of the game, it's a great first step towards it, since the game is now a lot more geared towards having to play it to win it. There's still crates to be earned as you play, but they will remove them gradually with more updates.

  • Linspire Server 2018 Released, Based On Ubuntu 16.04 With Xfce Desktop

    Back in January was the news of Linspire (formerly known as "Lindows") making a comeback and this week marks the release of Linspire Server 2018.

    Linspire/Lindows had previously been focused on just a desktop offering, but PC/OpenSystems acquired the Linspire rights a few months back and now they are spinning up new products. The newly-announced Linspire Server 2018 is based on Ubuntu Server 16.04 and is available for free with a self-support license while the company is also selling commercial support for interested users.

  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 Taiwan: Call for proposals is open

    openSUSE.Asia Committee calls for proposals of talks for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 held at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology on August 11 and 12. We might have community day on 10th August before the summit.

    openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the great events for openSUSE community (i.e., both contributors, and users) in Asia. Those who usually communicate online can get together from all over the world, talk face to face, and have fun. Members of the community will share their most recent knowledge, experiences, and learn FLOSS technologies surrounding openSUSE.

  • [Slackware] HandBrake 1.1.0 – now also in a patent-friendly package

    A new release of HandBrake, the video transcoder/ripper. The version 1.1.0 (released last month) comes with a load of enhancements, bug fixes and new features. Read the announcement to get all the details.

    And its GTK+-3 based GUI still compiles on Slackware 14.2. The devs must have done something right. Thank you! Still, it is sad that I can not compile the HandBrake GUI on Slackware 14.1 – or older – due to the GTK+-3 requirement (how I wish that the Qt based GUI was still an option). You could still build the CLI-only variant I suppose. But it might also be a good idea to upgrade to Slackware 14.2 if you thought of running the graphical HandBrake program…

  • Video Channel Updates

    I’ll still keep uploading to YouTube, but ultimately I’d like to make my self-hosted site the primary source for my content. Not sure if I’ll stay with MediaDrop, but it does tick a lot of boxes, and if its easy enough to extend, I’ll probably stick with it. MediaDrop might also be a good platform for viewing the Debian meetings videos like the DebConf videos.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNU nano 2.9.7 was released

Accumulated changes over the last five releases include: the ability to bind a key to a string (text and/or escape sequences), a default color of bright white on red for error messages, an improvement to the way the Scroll-Up and Scroll-Down commands work, and the new --afterends option to make Ctrl+Right (next word) stop at the end of a word instead of at the beginning. Check it out. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora News

Games: Cities: Skylines - Parklife, Descenders, WolfenDoom: Blade of Agony, Stoneshard

  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife launches this Thursday, get the main game super cheap on Humble Store
    With the release of Cities: Skylines - Parklife on Thursday, it's going to expand the already great city builder with some fun new features. For those who don't have Cities: Skylines yet, it has a massive sale on Humble Store with 75% off.
  • Extreme downhill free-riding game 'Descenders' just had a huge update, needs a quick fix on Linux
    Descenders is an extreme downhill free-riding game currently in Early Access and their first major update just went live. I've been quite a big fan of it, as it showed a massive amount of promise at the initial release. I held off on covering this update right away, since the released version of the update broke the 64bit Linux version. Nearly a week later and no fix, so here's how you can fix it manually: Right click on it in your Steam library and go to properties, then hit the Local Files tab up the top and press Browse Local Files… once there, open the Descenders_Data folder, go into the Plugins folder and delete "libfmod.so".
  • WolfenDoom - Blade of Agony is looking for AMD testers
    The GZDoom-powered FPS total conversion WolfenDoom: Blade of Agony [Official Site] is pushing on with development of Chapter 3: The Clash of Faith.
  • Open-world roguelike RPG 'Stoneshard' will have Linux support, nearly hit the Kickstarter goal
    Stoneshard [Official Site] is a pretty good sounding open-world RPG, it's currently on Kickstarter with a promise of Linux support and they've nearly hit their goal. With 26 days left to go, they've hit $28K of their $30K goal, so it looks like they will manage it easily. Inspired by the likes of Diablo, ADOM, Darkest Dungeon and more, they have a lot to live up to in terms of their inspiration. What makes it sound quite interesting, is the survival elements you heal to deal with like diseases, broken bones, mental health and more.