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Monday, 10 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Plan your own holiday calendar at the Linux command line

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to today's installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself, what’s a command-line toy. Even I'm not quite sure, but generally, it could be a game or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

It's quite possible that some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.

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Is open source wealth distribution fair?

Filed under
OSS

If wealth is the abundance of valuable possessions, open source has a wealth of software. While no one “owns” open source, some are better than others at converting this communal wealth to personal wealth.

Many open source project maintainers who produce free open source software do not have a model for deriving income from the assets they have created. However, companies that use open source software to enhance their products and services convert this valuable asset into income.

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Linux Foundation: Training, Cloud Foundry's Kearns, and Ibrahim Haddad

Filed under
Linux
  • The Linux Foundation and Coursera Launch New Specialization for Open Source, Linux and Git

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced today that enrollment for a new 4-course specialization, Open Source Software Development, Linux and Git is now open. Offered through the world’s largest online platform for higher education, Coursera, students will attain the skills and knowledge needed to work comfortably and productively in open source development communities; have a good understanding of the Linux environment, as well as methods and tools required to successfully use it; and know how to use Git, the distributed version control system. This is the first time The Linux Foundation and Coursera have partnered to provide training opportunities.

    Developed by the Linux Foundation’s Director of Training, Jerry Cooperstein, The Open Source Software Development, Linux and Git specialization is a remote learning program designed to give students a strong foundation of skills for working in open source development communities. It is designed for experienced computer users and developers who are looking to enter the world of open source development.

  • Cloud Foundry, Cloud Native, and Entering a Multi-Platform World with Abby Kearns

    When asked what she meant by multi-platform in the context of cloud, Kearns explained, “Multi-platform means that enterprises would want a variety of platforms for a variety of application workloads. There’s never going to be one technology that solves everything. It’s not going to be Cloud Foundry or Kubernetes; it’s going to be a mix. At the end of the day, enterprises are broad and complex. They have evolving needs. They want a mix of technologies that complement each other.”

    However, multi-platform brings its own set of challenges. “Technology is the easy part, my big worry is people getting caught up in the hype of something new and then they want to have it. Then they want to have the next shiny thing,” she said.

    When you get caught up in that hype cycle, you lose focus on what you need to do. Enterprises need to be aware of this and must ask themselves what do their business need to do? What are the outcomes they expect? How do they leverage technology to achieve that?

    “I think taking a step back and asking ourselves what are we really trying to solve,” she said. “I think just for me, sometimes it is — take a breath, pause and think, okay, where, where are we going and why?”

  • 2019 Predictions About Artificial Intelligence That Will Make Your Head Spin

    First, Ibrahim Haddad, Director of Research at The Linux Foundation says that there are two key areas to watch.

    "2019 is going to be the year of open source AI," predicts Haddad. "We’re already seeing companies begin to open source their internal AI projects and stacks, and I expect to see this accelerate in the coming year." He says that the reason for such a move is that it increases innovation, enables faster time-to-market and lower costs. "The cost of building a platform is high, and organizations are realizing the real value is in the models, training data and applications. We’re going to see harmonization around a set of critical projects creating a comprehensive open source stack for AI, machine learning and deep learning."

The Radeon RX 590 Is Finally Running Strong On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

It took the better part of a month since the debut of the latest Polaris hardware refresh, but with the latest AMDGPU kernel driver patch posted today, the AMD Radeon RX 590 now appears to be in great shape with the open-source Radeon graphics driver stack for Linux.

A few days ago I wrote about a few kernel patches and new firmware binaries for getting the Radeon RX 590 working on Linux. That was the case only to find that under 3D load, there were GPU hangs. With a new patch posted today, those hangs under load are corrected.

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Also: A Final Batch Of DRM-Misc-Next Updates Before Linux 4.21

Zafiro Icon – A New Set Of Flat Icon Theme Pack With Light Colors For Linux Desktops

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Zafiro icons is minimalist icons created with the flat-desing technique, utilizing washed out colors and always accompanied by white.

This icon set looks good and awesome.

It’s a new set of flat icon pack and it’s not based on any other product.

I felt it’s similar to Paper Icon and you can get that by navigation to the corresponding link.

Since it’s new set of icon and the developer is requesting us to report for any missing application related icons and not for other categories.

If any one fork this icon pack then the developer would feel that his work got recognized.

This icons are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Lxde, Xfce and others.

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Servers: OpenStack, ScyllaDB, Containers and Red Hat

Filed under
Server
  • Why Service Providers Should Invest in OpenStack Cloud

    451 Research notes in its report, “OpenStack: Enabler of Digital Transformation—How Service Providers Can Benefit,” that public cloud providers may not be suitable for every scenario. Customers could be concerned about recurring license or usage costs, data protection or regulatory requirements, or security issues—all of which limit the use of public cloud and proprietary technology models.

  • Scylla Summit 2018 write-up

    The ScyllaDB guys of course couldn’t avoid the Kubernetes frenzy so Moreno Garcia gave a lot of feedback and tips on how to operate Scylla on docker with minimal performance degradation.

    Kubernetes has been designed for stateless applications, not stateful ones and Docker does some automatic magic that have rather big performance hits on Scylla. You will basically have to play with affinities to dedicate one Scylla instance to run on one server with a “retain” reclaim policy.

    Remember that the official Scylla docker image runs with dev-mode enabled by default which turns off all performance checks on start. So start by disabling that and look at all the tips and literature that Moreno has put online!

  • How Docker Engine Works to Enable Containers
  • Open Outlook: Partner Ecosystem

    Last October leading up to our 2018 North America Partner conference, I shared with you the journey we are on to transform our partner experience. But that journey is more than the destination alone, how we got to where we are is just as important. I want to take this time to reflect on the last year and look into the future and where we can go with our partners. If I had to boil it down into a few themes for our partner ecosystem it would be hybrid cloud, the midmarket and verticals opportunity, and digital transformation.

Games: A Hat in Time and Gravel, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Stellaris MegaCorp

Filed under
Gaming
  • Looks like both A Hat in Time and Gravel are coming to Linux, ports from Virtual Programming

    Virtual Programming seem to be busy once again which is good news, turning up on their website recently was both A Hat in Time and Gravel.

  • Counter-Strike: GO Goes Battle Royale With Danger Zone

    With the success of Fortnite and Player Unknown's Battlegrounds in the "battle royale" genre, Valve is getting in on the action with CS:GO Danger Zone.

    [...]

    Sadly they seem to be behind in their previously expressed goal of switching CS:GO over to Vulkan with the Linux version still appearing to rely upon OpenGL.

  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive introduces a Battle Royale mode, goes free to play

    Valve have released Danger Zone, a Battle Royale mode for Counter-Strike: Global Offensive along with it going free to play.

    All existing players have been upgraded to "Prime Status", which is a special status for verified players and only matches you against other Prime players. To become Prime after this update, you need to either purchase Prime from the Steam page or "reach Rank 21 by earning XP and add an eligible phone number to your Steam account" according to Valve.

    [...]

    This is what I have been waiting for. An interesting Battle Royale game available on Linux with good support and since it's Valve it will no doubt work well on Linux. Not only that, it's likely going to actually be an active game, especially since it's free.

  • Stellaris MegaCorp expansion and the 2.2 'Le Guin' free update are now both out

    Once again, Paradox have put out more content both paid and free for Stellaris and my love of the game continues on rather strong.

Cutelyst 2.6.0 released! Now on VCPKG and buildroot

Filed under
KDE

Cutelyst, a Qt Web Framework has upped to 2.6.0. This release if full of important bug fixes and is the best version when targeting Windows OS so far. It reached 5 years old, 440 stars on GitHub and since the last release has had many users asking questions, reporting issues and making pull requests.

Until now Windows support was a thing I mostly trusted Appveyor compiling and running tests fine, but this changed a bit in this release, I got a freelance job where some terminals would be editing images to be printed on T-Shirts, then they sent their art to a central server which receives and print, so, after I finished the QtQuick application and managed to convince them of running the terminals on KDE/Plasma as it was basically a kiosk full screen application I went on writing the server part.

Using Cutelyst on the server was a perfect match, the process was a Qt Widgets application, that, when linked to Cutelyst::WSGI could start listening all on the same process without issues, every terminal were connected via websockets protocol, which was just awesome, whenever I changed a terminal config I could see it changing instantly on the terminal, QWebSocketServer class could indeed do the same, but, to create the T-Shirt Art Fonts and Pictures needed to be “installed” on the terminal. Now with HTTP capabilities I simply exported all those folders and the whenever I sent a new JSON with config to the terminals, it contained the URLs of all these files which where updated in a blink.

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Also: www.kde.org

Microsoft's Latest Attempt at Stopping People From Using Chrome

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
OSS
Web
  • Microsoft is building Edge on top of Chromium (open source version of Google Chrome

    It is official now. Microsoft is throwing away old code base of Edge browser and making next version of Edge browser on top of Chromium. The open source project behind Google Chrome is known as Chromium. Microsoft is building a Chromium browser to replace Edge on Windows 10 on both x86 and ARM-based systems.

  • Microsoft Edge: Making the web better through more open source collaboration [Ed: This is Microsoft. Whose browser was always proprietary. Whose abuses on the WWW are well documented. Yeah, lecture us now on "open source collaboration" (not freedom).]
  • Microsoft's Edge browser moving to Chromium
  • Microsoft Confirms Edge will use Chromium Rendering Engine, Launches Insider Program
  • Goodbye, EdgeHTML

    Microsoft is officially giving up on an independent shared platform for the internet. By adopting Chromium, Microsoft hands over control of even more of online life to Google.

    This may sound melodramatic, but it’s not. The “browser engines” — Chromium from Google and Gecko Quantum from Mozilla — are “inside baseball” pieces of software that actually determine a great deal of what each of us can do online. They determine core capabilities such as which content we as consumers can see, how secure we are when we watch content, and how much control we have over what websites and services can do to us. Microsoft’s decision gives Google more ability to single-handedly decide what possibilities are available to each one of us.

Programming: PHP 7.3.0, Rust 2018, and Python

Filed under
Development
  • PHP 7.3.0 Release Announcement

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.3.0. This release marks the third feature update to the PHP 7 series.

  • PHP 7.3.0 Released With Improved Performance, Foreign Function Interface

    PHP 7.3 is out today as the first big update in a year to the PHP7 programming language.

    PHP 7.3 introduces the Foreign Function Interface (FFI) to access functions/variables/structures from C within PHP, a platform independent function for accessing the system's network interface information, an is_countable() function was added, WebP is now supported within the GD image create from string, updated SQLite integration, and a range of other improvements.

  • Rust 2018 is here… but what is it?

    This post was written in collaboration with the Rust Team (the “we” in this article). You can also read their announcement (coming soon) on their blog.

    Starting today, the Rust 2018 edition is in its first release. With this edition, we’ve focused on productivity… on making Rust developers as productive as they can be.

  • PyCon 2019 proposal submission deadline is fast approaching!

    The busy holiday season is upon us and before you know it the new year will be here. January 3rd AoE is the deadline to submit proposals. We've added a draft feature to proposals so you can begin your proposal submission now and come back to make final edits before the January 3rd deadline.

  • Dataquest: An Intro to Deep Learning in Python

    Deep learning is a type of machine learning that’s growing at an almost frightening pace. Nearly every projection has the deep learning industry expanding massively over the next decade. This market research report, for example, expects deep learning to grow 71x in the US and more than that globally over the next ten years. There’s never been a better time than now to get started.

  • Oliver Bestwalter for tox webinar next week

    Python has long distinguished itself with a culture of testing. In the last decade, two libraries have combined to give powerful testing in isolation — pytest and tox. The latter combines easily with pytest to give you a clean environment across test runs, including across multiple versions of Python.

    tox certainly counts as one of those things lots of PyCharm customers know they should know, but don’t yet know. To make it easy to break the ice we’ve invited Oliver Bestwalter to introduce tox in a PyCharm webinar. Oliver is the maintainer of tox and advocate for release automation in projects.

  • PyCharm 2018.3.1 Released with Various Bug Fixes

    PyCharm IDE released version 2018.3.1 one day ago with various bug fixes. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 16.04 and higher.

GCC 7.4 Released

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • GCC 7 Release Series

    The GNU project and the GCC developers are pleased to announce the release of GCC 7.4.

    This release is a bug-fix release, containing fixes for regressions in GCC 7.3 relative to previous releases of GCC.

  • GCC 7.4 Released With 100+ Bug Fixes

    For those still on the GCC7 stable series rather than the current GCC8 series that soon will be succeeded by GCC9, GCC 7.4 is available today.

    With GCC 7.4 being the first GCC7 update since v7.3 from this past January, there are a lot of regression/bug fixes. In fact, GNU Compiler Collection developers report that more than 100 bugs have been fixed in this latest stable point release.

FSF adds Hyperbola GNU/Linux-libre to list of endorsed GNU/Linux distributions

Filed under
GNU

The FSF's list showcases GNU/Linux operating system distributions whose developers have made a commitment to follow its Guidelines for Free System Distributions. Each one includes and endorses exclusively free "as in freedom" software.

After a thorough vetting process, the FSF concluded that Hyperbola, a long-term support simplicity-focused distribution based on Arch GNU/Linux, meets these criteria.

"In a world where proprietary operating systems continually up the ante in terms of the abuse they heap on their users, adding another distribution to the list of fully free systems is a welcome development. Hyperbola represents another safe home for users looking for complete control over their own computing," said John Sullivan, FSF's executive director.

"Hyperbola is a fully free distribution based on Arch snapshots and Debian development without nonfree software, documentation, or any type of support for the installation or execution of nonfree software. Unlike Arch, which is a rolling release distribution, Hyperbola is a long-term one focused on stability and security inspired from Debian and Devuan," said André Silva, Hyperbola co-founder and developer.

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GNU Guix and GuixSD 0.16.0 released

Filed under
OS
GNU

We are pleased to announce the new release of GNU Guix and GuixSD, version 0.16.0! This release is (hopefully!) the last one before 1.0—we have been closing most key items for 1.0 over the last few months.

The release comes with GuixSD ISO-9660 installation images, a virtual machine image of GuixSD, and with tarballs to install the package manager on top of your GNU/Linux distro, either from source or from binaries. Guix users can update by running guix pull.

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The Road Ahead for Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Linux and the open source business model are far different today than many of the early developers might have hoped. Neither can claim a rags-to-riches story. Rather, their growth cycles have been a series of hit-or-miss milestones.

The Linux desktop has yet to find a home on the majority of consumer and enterprise computers. However, Linux-powered technology has long ruled the Internet and conquered the cloud and Internet of Things deployments. Both Linux and free open source licensing have dominated in other ways.

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NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Linux Gaming Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While we have delivered many Linux benchmarks the past number of weeks from the GeForce RTX 2070 and GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, up until recently we didn't have access to the RTX 2080 that is the card positioned between those two current consumer Turing graphics cards. In kicking off our RTX 2080 Linux benchmarking, here is a look at the Linux gaming performance compared to an assortment of AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards tested on Ubuntu Linux while in the days ahead will be the OpenCL/CUDA tests and more.

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Open Source Compliance Projects Unite Under New ACT Group

Filed under
OSS

As open source software releases and customer adoption continue to increase, many companies underestimate what’s involved with going open source. It’s not only a matter of volunteering for the encouraged, but optional, upstream contributions to FOSS projects, but also complying with the legal requirements of open source licenses. Software increasingly includes a diverse assortment of open source code with a variety of licenses, as well as a mix of proprietary code. Sorting it all out to can be a major hassle, but the alternative is potential legal action and damaged relations with the open source community.

The Linux Foundation has just launched an Automated Compliance Tooling (ACT) project to help companies comply with open source licensing requirements. The new group consolidates its existing FOSSology and Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) projects and adds two new projects: Endocode’s QMSTR for integrating open source compliance toolchain within build systems and VMware’s Tern, an inspection tool for identifying open source components within containers.

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OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release Five, 5G ready

    ETSI announced the availability of OSM Release Five, which is an advancement towards 5G network deployments and their orchestration by telecom operators. In Release Five, OSM extends its orchestration functionalities beyond virtual domains, expanding them across transport networks, as well as physical and hybrid network elements. OSM Release Five embraced a new micro-service architecture to facilitate the integration of an impressive number of new features, making Release Five suited for 5G scenarios, distributed and Edge deployments, and any kind of Network as a Service (NaaS) offer.

  • Despite risks and side effects: “Open source will become even more important in the future” [Ed: Synopsys are anti-FOSS; here they are promoting the "risk" talking point; they hired all the Black Duck staff after a Microsoft marketing man had founded this anti-GPL firm.]
  • Docker CEO Steve Singh on the firm's drive to enterprise and the future of open source

    Which problems lie in the future, and what are customers starting to say now that Docker might have to further address in the future? Singh explains that there is a growing tendency for companies to want to share their applications, whether they're legacy or brand new, with other businesses. Taking those apps out of their environments, containerising them and then making them shareable is somewhere Docker could increasingly fit in.

    "If there's a great piece of technology that moves money from location A to location B you might ask yourself, well, why do I have to rewrite that piece of technology? Why can't I share that technology if somebody else has written a fantastic service for funds transfer?

  • Wipro, Alfresco Expand Partnership to Offer Open Source Based Digital Transformation Capabilities
  • Comcast's Howald: Open source is key to service providers' future

    Low latency services and applications, the constant need for more bandwidth, IoT, and augmented reality and virtual reality services are not just dim possibilities for service providers, they're constant drumbeats that are getting louder.

    Speaking in a keynote session Wednesday morning at ONF Connect, Comcast's Rob Howald, vice president of access architecture, said it's no longer business as usual for carriers.

    Service providers need to do things differently to meet the onslaught of challenges, but they also need to provide a better customer experience while also not having an impact on the current services, Howald said.

  • Brahma Wallet Officially Released Version 1.0: Open Source, Efficient and User Friendly

    The general version of Brahma Wallet was officially released on December 1st, 2018. It can be adapted to Android 5.0 or above mobile phones. This is another product of Brahma OS besides the Brahma Image. It also demonstrates that Brahma OS is building the underlying platform of high-performance block chain. At the same time, Brahma OS is building and perfecting the ecological system of Brahma OS decentralized operating system which was seamlessly docked with digital asset management.

  • Google Chrome 71 now rolling out for Windows, Mac, and Linux operating system

    Google has announced its newly-released Chrome 71, the latest version of its web browser, is now rolling out for Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems (OS), which aims to keep deceptive websites off.

    The latest version of Google's browser was in the works over the past few months and has just left the beta programme.

    "The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 71 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux." This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.

  • A call for open research computation

    The next step is likely to be what's now dubbed open research computation: publication of the software originally used to obtain and process scientific data, and to derive the output quoted in a paper. Validity and reproducibility of results are pivotal in the quest to converge on a universal truth (i.e. the scientific method), and represent an important driving force behind the movement toward open science.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Snake your way across your Linux terminal

Welcome back to the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. It's hard to say exactly, but my definition is anything that helps you have fun at the terminal. We've been on a roll with games over the weekend, and it was fun, so let's look at one more game today, Snake! Snake is an oldie but goodie; versions of it have been around seemingly forever. The first version I remember playing was one called Nibbles that came packaged with QBasic in the 1990s, and was probably pretty important to my understanding of what a programming language even was. Here I had the source code to a game that I could modify and just see what happens, and maybe learn something about what all of those funny little words that made up a programming language were all about. Read more

Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS

Your small business needs to grow, there's no doubt about that. Expansion is the name of the game when you have a one or two man company, and you're going to want to bring on at least 20 or more people to really get the cogs grinding. And if you're working on a digital interface, slowly phasing pen and paper out of the office you operate in, you're going to need plenty of people around to oil the engine and keep the tech in a usable state. Because of this, technology helps your small business grow, and can do quite a few wonders for the time and effort you invested into it. Even if you're working on a minimal budget, there's quite a few option to look into to make sure you've got just as much of a chance as the shop next door to you that seems to have a never ending stream of customers. After all, you've got to get your internal processes working perfectly first, and with a bit of technological aid, you might manage that faster than you first thought. Read more

Security: Polkit, CSP, Ansible and Router Hardening Checklist

  • Polkit CVE-2018-19788 vs. SELinux
  • Why is your site not using Content Security Policy / CSP?
    Yesterday, I had the pleasure of watching on Frikanalen the OWASP talk by Scott Helme titled "What We’ve Learned From Billions of Security Reports". I had not heard of the Content Security Policy standard nor its ability to "call home" when a browser detect a policy breach (I do not follow web page design development much these days), and found the talk very illuminating. The mechanism allow a web site owner to use HTTP headers to tell visitors web browser which sources (internal and external) are allowed to be used on the web site. Thus it become possible to enforce a "only local content" policy despite web designers urge to fetch programs from random sites on the Internet, like the one enabling the attack reported by Scott Helme earlier this year.
  • Red Hat Ansible Playbooks Password Exposure Vulnerability [CVE-2018-16859]
    CVE-2018-16859. A vulnerability in Red Hat Ansible could allow a local attacker to discover plaintext passwords on a targeted system.
  • Router Hardening Checklist