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Thursday, 19 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat, Fleet Commander, and Fedora 27 Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2017 - 11:12pm
Story Android: New Devices Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2017 - 11:10pm
Story OSS and Sharing Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2017 - 11:08pm
Story CMS: Mass.gov Moves to Drupal, Voyager 1.0 is Out Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2017 - 11:06pm
Story Chrome and Mozilla Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2017 - 11:03pm
Story FUD and Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2017 - 11:01pm
Story Microsoft never disclosed 2013 hack of secret vulnerability database Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2017 - 10:44pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2017 - 10:01pm
Story Plasma 5.11 – Keep the momentum going Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2017 - 9:57pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2017 - 7:07pm

LibreOffice 6.0 Arrives Late January 2018, First Bug Hunting Session Starts Soon

Filed under
LibO

Now that the LibreOffice Conference 2017 event is over, it's time for The Document Foundation to start the bug hunting sessions, and the first one was set for the end of the week, October 20, 2017, for the first Alpha release of the LibreOffice 6.0 office suite.

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World’s smallest i.MX6 module tapped for customizable Linux SBC

Filed under
Linux

Gumstix has added NXP’s tiny, Linux-driven SCM-i.MX6 module to its Geppetto design library, and has launched a “Cobalt MC” SBC to showcase the tiny COM.

Gumstix continues to add more computer-on-modules and single board computers to its Geppetto D2O design library, offering more options for developers to build custom board designs online for prototyping and quick manufacture of small runs. The latest addition, following its support for the Raspberry Pi and Pi Compute Module via its Gumstix Pi boards, is support for NXP’s tiny dual-core i.MX6 based SCM-i.MX6D COM, as well as for a similar quad-core SCM-i.MX6Q.

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KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Over 30 Bugs Fixed

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KDE

Just one week after the release of the major KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment, the KDE Project on Tuesday announced the immediate availability of the maintenance update to the series, KDE Plasma 5.11.1.

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Image Processing on Linux

Filed under
Linux

I've covered several scientific packages in this space that generate nice graphical representations of your data and work, but I've not gone in the other direction much. So in this article, I cover a popular image processing package called ImageJ. Specifically, I am looking at Fiji, an instance of ImageJ bundled with a set of plugins that are useful for scientific image processing.

The name Fiji is a recursive acronym, much like GNU. It stands for "Fiji Is Just ImageJ". ImageJ is a useful tool for analyzing images in scientific research—for example, you may use it for classifying tree types in a landscape from aerial photography. ImageJ can do that type categorization. It's built with a plugin architecture, and a very extensive collection of plugins is available to increase the available functionality.

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4MRecover 23.0 Data Recovery Linux Live System Enters Beta, Based on 4MLinux 23

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Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki‏ is informing us today on the immediate availability for download of the Beta release of his upcoming 4MRecover 23.0 live system designed for data recovery tasks.

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Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and elementary OS All Patched Against WPA2 KRACK Bug

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Security

As you are aware, there's a major WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access II) security vulnerability in the wild, affecting virtually any device or operating system that uses the security protocol, including all GNU/Linux distributions.

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Pixel 2 and 2 XL review—The best Android phone you can buy

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Welcome to year two of Google Hardware. In 2016, Google jumped into the Android hardware space with its first self-branded device, the Google Pixel. Google's software prowess shined on the Pixel 1, offering up exclusive features like the Google Assistant, the best Android camera thanks to advanced software processing, fast day-one OS updates and betas, and the smoothest, best-performing overall build of Android. The killer software package made it the best Android phone of the previous generation.

The Pixel still represented Google's first foray into smartphone hardware, though, and it didn't offer anything special in the hardware department. It was a bland-looking iPhone clone. It had the same specs and basic design as everything else. The Pixel even skipped water resistance, which had become an expected feature at that price point. Google said it wanted to make its own hardware, but it didn't actually build special hardware.

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6 Best Open Source Alternatives to Microsoft Office for Linux

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Linux

Looking for Microsoft Office in Linux? Here are the best free and open source alternatives to Microsoft Office for Linux.
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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Search for a way to get home in 'Estranged: Act II' now on Linux

    Continuing on from the first part, Estranged: Act II [Steam, Official Site] is now available on Linux. The developer switched from Source to Unreal Engine for the second part as well.

  • Strategy game 'Mushroom Wars 2' arrives on Linux
  • Meson-ized Mesa Now Supports More Drivers

    At the end of September initial Meson support landed in Mesa while hitting 17.3-devel Git now is support for more of the Mesa drivers under this new build system.

    As of Monday in Mesa Git, the Meson build system now supports building LLVMpipe, Softpipe, Nouveau, RadeonSI, Gallium3D winsys, Gallium3D state trackers and other components, and a variety of other changes. In other words, it's now much more practical using Meson in Mesa now that it's beginning to support almost all of the Mesa3D drivers/components.

  • Private Internet Access becomes a KDE Patron

    "We are very happy to have the Private Internet Access/London Trust Media as a KDE Patron and KDE e.V. Advisory Board member. The values of Internet openness are deeply rooted in both organisations, as well as those of privacy and security. Working together will allow us to build better systems and a better Internet for everyone", said Aleix Pol Gonzalez, Vice-President of the KDE e.V.

    "Private Internet Access is highly committed to giving back to those communities that have helped the brand and its parent company get to where it is today, and we are very much aware that vast proportions of the infrastructure we use on a daily basis, in the office and at home, is powered by Free and Open Source Software. We have made a pledge to show our gratitude by supporting FOSS projects to help encourage development and growth. We are proud to be supporting KDE and the crucial work that the project does for the Linux Desktop" said Christel Dahlskjear, Director of Sponsorships and Events at Private Internet Access.

  • Indian enterprise suffers from the innovator's dilemma: Benjamin Henshall, Red Hat

    "Open source projects are like children; no two projects are exactly the same, with different communities, structures, governance and contributors," says Benjamin Henshall, Director, AppDev Solutions, APAC at Red Hat.

    According to Henshall, open source, which is now the preferred model for consuming software will build the next generation IT systems. Speaking with Computerworld India, Henshall talks about how open source is the foundation for successful IoT deployment and how Red Hat is still the leader in this space.

  • What I have found interesting in Fedora during the week 41 of 2017

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • MiniDebConf Prishtina 2017

    On 7th of October in Prishtina, Kosova’s capital, was hosted the first mini deb conference.
    The MiniDebConf Prishtina was an event open to everyone, regardless of their level of knowledge about Debian or other free and open source projects. At MiniDebConf Prishtina there were organized a range of topics incidental to Debian and free software, including any free software project, Outreachy internship, privacy, security, digital rights and diversity in IT.

  • No more no surprises

    Debian has generally always had, as a rule, “sane defaults” and “no surprises”. This was completely shattered for me when Vim decided to hijack the mouse from my terminal and break all copy/paste functionality. This has occured since the release of Debian 9.

  • Debian Security Advisory 3999-1

    Debian Linux Security Advisory 3999-1 - Mathy Vanhoef of the imec-DistriNet research group of KU Leuven discovered multiple vulnerabilities in the WPA protocol, used for authentication in wireless networks. Those vulnerabilities applies to both the access point (implemented in hostapd) and the station (implemented in wpa_supplicant).

  • LXD Weekly Status #19

    This past week, part of the team was back in New York for more planning meetings, getting the details of the next 6 months, including LXC, LXD and LXCFS 3.0 fleshed out.

Software and howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • wikipedia2text – A Command Line Tool For Querying The Wikipedia Article

    Hi folks am back with another interesting topic called wikipedia2text. It’s a small Shell script to query the Wikipedia articles in console, also it can open the article in any browser.

    This shell script uses text-browser to query and render Wikipedia articles. The output will be printed to standard out. It Currently supports around 30 Wikipedia languages.

    Most of us prefer Wikipedia to know the detailed information about any company or any product information & it’s history. For any google search by default Wikipedia link comes in Top 5.

  • Yay! I Found Yet Another Reliable AUR Helper

    Howdy Arch Users! I’ve got a good news for you. Today, I stumbled upon yet another reliable AUR helper called “Yay”. Yep! the name of this AUR helper is Yay. Currently, I use Pacaur for installing AUR packages. It does great job and I really like it. I also have used other AUR helpers such as Packer and Yaourt in the past. After reading its features, I thought to give “Yay” a try and see how things works. So, here we go!

  •  

  • mount.nfs: requested NFS version or transport protocol is not supported
  • How to Deploy Clojure Web Application on Debian 9
  • Copr stack dockerized!
  • Using Dell Dock With Ubuntu

    Over the years I have found my way around many minor hurdles when using Ubuntu, the most recent being Using the DELL ULTRAHD 4K USB 3.0 DOCKING STATION (D3100).

GNU/Linux Desktops/Laptops and Devices

Filed under
GNU
Linux

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Google and IBM launch open-source security tool for containers

    Google and IBM, together with a few other partners, released an open-source project that gathers metadata that developers can use to secure their software.

    According to an IBM blog post, the goal of the project is to help developers keep security standards, while microservices and containers cut the software supply chain.

  • Top 10 Hacking Techniques Used By Hackers

    We live in a world where cyber security has become more important than physical security, thousands of websites and emails are hacked daily. Hence, It is important to know the Top hacking techniques used by hackers worldwide to exploit vulnerable targets all over the internet.

  • Protect your wifi on Fedora against KRACK

    You may have heard about KRACK (for “Key Reinstallation Attack”), a vulnerability in WPA2-protected Wi-Fi. This attack could let attackers decrypt, forge, or steal data, despite WPA2’s improved encryption capabilities. Fear not — fixes for Fedora packages are on their way to stable.

  • Federal watchdog tells Equifax—no $7.25 million IRS contract for you

    The Government Accountability Office (GAO) on Monday rejected Equifax's bid to retain its $7.25 million "taxpayer identity" contract—the one awarded days after Equifax announced it had exposed the Social Security numbers and other personal data of some 145 million people.

  • Adobe Flash vulnerability exploited by BlackOasis hacking group to plant FinSpy spyware

    Security researchers have discovered a new Adobe Flash vulnerability that has already been exploited by hackers to deploy the latest version of FinSpy malware on targets. Kaspersky Lab researchers said a hacker group called BlackOasis has already taken advantage of the zero-day exploit – CVE-2017-11292 – to deliver its malicious payload via a Microsoft Word document.

  • Companies turn a blind eye to open source risk [Ed: No, Equifax got b0rked due to bad practices, negligence, incompetence, not FOSS]

    For instance, criminals who potentially gained access to the personal data of the Equifax customers exploited an Apache Struts CVE-2017-5638 vulnerability.

  • Checking Your Passwords Against the Have I Been Pwned List

    Two months ago, Troy Hunt, the security professional behind Have I been pwned?, released an incredibly comprehensive password list in the hope that it would allow web developers to steer their users away from passwords that have been compromised in past breaches.

How to use an Arduino and Raspberry Pi to turn a fiber optic neural network into wall art

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Hollywood has made many big promises about artificial intelligence (AI): how it will destroy us, how it will save us, and how it will pass us butter. One of the less memorable promises is how cool it will look.

There's a great example of amazing AI visualization in Avengers: Age of Ultron when Tony Stark's AI butler Jarvis interacts with Ultron and we see an organic floating network of light morphing and pulsing. I wanted to make something similar to fill blank space on my apartment wall (to improve upon the usual Ikea art). Obviously, I couldn't create anything as amazing as Jarvis as a floating orb of light; however, I could use a machine learning algorithm that looks interesting with quirky data visualization: a neural network! It employs biologically inspired elements that were meant to replicate how (we thought) the human brain works.

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Red Hat: Alibaba, CRI-O, Silencing Critics

Filed under
Red Hat

Linux Users Discuss DRM

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Users Discuss DRM – Unleaded Hangout

    Today my Patreons and I discuss encrypted media extensions, digital rights management and our freedom on the Linux desktop.

  • The European Parliament Should Be Talking About DRM, Right Now!

    [Teresa Nobre, Communia Association, Link (CC-0)] The European Union is currently discussing a reform of its copyright system, including making mandatory certain copyright exceptions, in order to introduce a balance into the system. However, no one, except Julia Reda, is paying any attention to one of the biggest obstacles to the enforcement of copyright exceptions in the digital age: technological protection measures (TPM), including digital rights management (DRM). In this blogpost we will present the reasons why the European Parliament should not lose this opportunity to discuss a reform of the EU anti-circumvention rules.

Games: OpenMW and Linux Gaming Benchmark

Filed under
Gaming
  • OpenMW, the open source Morrowind game engine continues advancing

    OpenMW [Official Site], the open source Morrowind game engine continues advancing with recent blog posts highlighting some changes sounding rather great.

    Speaking on their official blog, the developers noted back in September that they've had some new developers come on board, with thanks in part to the multiplayer "TES3MP" project (Morrowind Multiplayer), which is built from OpenMW.

  • Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 1800X For NVIDIA/Radeon Linux Gaming

    Following last week's look at using the new "Coffee Lake" Intel Core i3 / i5 / i7 CPUs for Linux gaming comparison among our other ongoing tests of these new "8th Gen" processors, a frequent request has been a closer look at the gaming performance between the Core i7 8700K and the Ryzen 7 1800X. Here's a look with two AMD Radeon graphics cards and two NVIDIA GeForce offerings.

Bloomberg's big move on machine learning and open source

Filed under
OSS

With its orange text on black interface and colour coded keyboard, the Bloomberg professional services terminal – known simply as ‘The Terminal’ – doesn’t appear to have changed much since it was launched in the early ’80s.

But behind the retro (Bloomberg prefers ‘modern icon’) stylings, its delivery of financial markets data news, and trading tools has advanced rapidly.

The terminal’s 315,000 subscribers globally are now able to leverage on machine learning, deep learning, and natural language processing techniques developed by the company, as they seek an edge in their investment decisions. Bloomberg is also applying those same techniques to its internal processes.

Leading the company’s efforts in the area is Bloomberg’s head of data science Gideon Mann, who spoke with CIO Australia earlier this month.

[...]

Behind much of Bloomberg’s recent builds has been an open source ethic. Mann says there has been a sea change within the company about open source.

"When the company started in 1981 and there really wasn't a whole lot of open source. And so there was a mentality of you know if it's not invented here we're not interested,” Mann says.

[...]

The organisation took some convincing, but, championed by the CTO, there has been a “huge culture change” towards open source.

“There are two groups you got to convince: you’ve got to convince management that using open source is going to be safe and lead to better software, and then you also have to convince engineers that using open source is going to increase their skillset, will lead to software that’s easier to maintain and is less buggy and it's going to be a more beautiful system. Once you can kind of convince those two then you're set,” Mann says.

The company is an active contributor to projects including Solr, Hadoop, Apache Spark and Open Stack.

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Also: Uber Open Sources AthenaX, Its Streaming Analytics Platform

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More in Tux Machines

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.

Ubuntu Leftovers

Server: MAAS, OPNFV, 'DevOps', and Docker

  • MAAS KVM Pods
    OpenStack is the dominant solution in the IaaS space, fueled by the need for reliable, scalable and interoperable private cloud infrastructure to accommodate cloud native applications. Through OpenStack’s open APIs, tenants can easily deploy elaborate virtual (overlay) networks, integrate with a variety of storage backends, even leverage modern hypervisor-like machine containers (LXD) for bare metal performance. Although the tooling allows a full fledged OpenStack deployment on just a single machine, the intrinsic efficiencies that OpenStack’s design promises, materialize at a certain scale — typically at least 12 servers.
  • DevOps for NFV: OPNFV Infrastructure and Continuous Integration
    In this article series, we have been discussing the Understanding OPNFV book. Previously, we provided an introduction to network functions virtualization (NFV), discussed the role of OPNFV in network transformation, and looked at how OPNFV integrates and enhances upstream projects. We continue our series with in-depth insight into the OPNFV DevOps toolchain, hardware labs, continuous integration (CI) pipeline, and deployment tools (installers) from chapters 6 and 7 of the book.  
  • A Chat with Chef about the DevOps Movement and Habitat Builder
    Last week at our annual user conference, Node.js Interactive, we announced several new members to the Node.js Foundation. One of the members that joined is Chef. Chef works with more than a thousand companies around the world to deliver their vision of digital transformation. We sat down with the team at Chef to talk about how Node.js fits within the DevOps movement, why they joined the Node.js Foundation, and also about a new offering from the group called Habitat Builder.
  • Why Use Docker with R? A DevOps Perspective
    There have been several blog posts going around about why one would use Docker with R. In this post I’ll try to add a DevOps point of view and explain how containerizing R is used in the context of the OpenCPU system for building and deploying R servers.
  • Docker on Docker at DockerCon EU 17
    Docker Inc. the company behind the open-source Docker container technology doesn't just build docker, it also used the same technology to power its own services.