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Tuesday, 11 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 3:30pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 9:01am
Story When Linux required installation parties Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 8:33am
Story Try the Dash to Dock extension for Fedora Workstation Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 8:30am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 8:25am
Story Snake your way across your Linux terminal Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 8:14am
Story Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 8:11am
Story Security: Polkit, CSP, Ansible and Router Hardening Checklist Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 7:02am
Story Games: DiRT 4, SuperTuxKart and The 10 Best Free Linux Games Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 6:54am
Story Audiocasts: Linux Action News, OpenBSD in Stereo, GNU World Order, Coder Radio and Open Source Security Podcast Roy Schestowitz 2 10/12/2018 - 6:30am

Imagine 128 & Matrox Linux X.Org Display Drivers See Updates For The 2018 Holidays

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

If you happen to have any Number Nine Imagine 128 or Matrox graphics cards sitting around, there are new Linux X.Org display driver updates out this weekend for these vintage parts.

Should you have an Imagine 128 PCI graphics card still around, the xf86-video-i128 driver has been updated. This new open-source X.Org display driver update has just some compiler/build updates but nothing too exciting unless you just enjoying reminiscing over old display hardware.

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Programming With Python and Node.js in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Development

Raven: An awesome news reader

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

I have used RSS on-again and off-again for many years. It’s a great way to aggregate the news you want to read, from sources all over the web. The problem with it, for me, has always been based on the client. Generally, the user experience and design of them has always been a bit clunky; despite there being tons of them out there.

Also, finding that elusive client that ticks all the boxes, and works for my favourite operating system, seems to be a bit of a unicorn! Readers like FeedReader, Liferea and RSSOwl are alternatives to this new kid on the block.

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ROE Kernel Hardening Continues To Restrict KVM VMs To Only Its Own Memory

Filed under
Linux

For helping to enhance the security of servers running KVM for virtualization, there's been a ROE protection kernel hardening patch series in the works. This new addition to the kernel allows the host operating system to restrict a guest's access strictly to its own memory. It's unclear though yet if the ROE protection will make the cut in time for the upcoming Linux 4.21 kernel cycle.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Episode 9: Humanity, Magic, and Glitter

    Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Bryan Lunduke about Linux and humanity.

  • FlightGear Flight Simulator 2018.3 Released with New Features

    FlightGear 2018.3 was finally released with many exciting new features, enhancements and bugfixes including usability improvements to the launcher, better visuals for AI and MP aircraft.

  • Linux Rabbit Attacks IoT Devices to Secretly Mine Monero [Ed: Nothing to do with "Linux". Relies on open ports with weak passwords, unlike Windows, which just has intentional back doors.]

    The global cryptocurrency mining malware trend isn’t coming to an end anytime soon. A newly discovered malware strain specifically targets Linux and IoT devices. This is a different approach as most of these attacks focus on Windows devices. Researchers are concerned this new mining software will only make cryptojacking an even bigger problem. Known as Linux Rabbit, this software kit packs quite the punch.

  • Linux Rabbit and Rabbot Malware Leveraged to Install Cryptominers [Ed: They even called it “Linux Rabbit”; could just call it "WeakPassword Rabbit”]

Linux Foundation on Compliance and Openwashing Examples

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • A new ACT for open source compliance from The Linux Foundation

    What’s new in the world of open source? The Linux Foundation announced that they are launching a new tooling project for improving open source compliance. This new project’s goal is to ensure that when using open source projects, users understand what they are complying with.

    The Linux Foundation continues to be a leading beacon in the FOSS world, with worldwide events and over one million professionals enrolled in their free training courses. Just some of the successful projects that the Linux Foundation hosts include Rook, Node.js, Kubernetes, and Linkerd (which just got a fancy new UI makeover). You don’t have to look far to see names and noteworthy tools that you’re familiar with!

  • The Linux Foundation forms new Automated Compliance Tooling project

    “There are numerous open source compliance tooling projects but the majority are unfunded and have limited scope to build out robust usability or advanced features,” said Kate Stewart, senior director of strategic programs at The Linux Foundation. “We have also heard from many organizations that the tools that do exist do not meet their current needs. Forming a neutral body under The Linux Foundation to work on these issues will allow us to increase funding and support for the compliance tooling development community.”

    As part of the announcement, ACT is also welcoming two new projects that will be hosted at the Linux Foundation: OpenChain, a project that identifies key recommended processes for open-source management; and the Open Compliance Project, which will educate and help developers and companies better understand license requirements.

  • A Closer Look At Tesla's Open-Source Patent Pledge
  • Why Amazon's customer obsession should make it more open source friendly [Ed: What "customer obsession"? Amazon is a surveillance company whose biggest AWS customer is the CIA (with which it shares tons of data from all around the world).]

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Crossplane

    With the release of open-source multi-cloud management interface Crossplane, cloud services developer Upbound wants to provide an open and consistent way to handle integrations with whichever cloud platforms you throw at it.

    “Crossplane presents a declarative management style API that covers a wide range of portable abstractions including databases, message queues, buckets, data pipelines, serverless, clusters, and many more coming,” Upbound CEO Bassam Tabbara wrote in a blog post. “It’s based on the declarative resource model of the popular Kubernetes project, and applies many of the lessons learned in container orchestration to multicloud workload and resource orchestration.”

  • JD.com And Open Source Technology Development

    Currently running the largest Kubernetes cluster in the world, JD.com has demonstrated how companies can use data infrastructures in new and innovative ways. One of the first companies to shift to Kubernetes, Jingdong has since been able to forge partnerships with other companies, including CNCF, to create even stronger relationships with IT developers, users, and software companies. Because of this, open source development has started to become a much bigger aspect of many company’s IT plans.

    Due to its commitment to innovation, Jingdong recently became a platinum end user member of CNCF, meaning the company now has a spot on the governance board. This will now allow Jingdong to have a say in the direction of future Foundation initiatives. As a result, increased efficiency, reduced costs, and higher levels of customer service will be on display in Jingdong and other companies in the years ahead.

    By using Kubernetes clusters, Jingdong and other companies can now support even wider ranges of IT applications, as well as big data and Artificial Intelligence applications. With these expanded technological options, it will now be possible to reduce silos between DevOP teams and operations personnel. By making the process between these teams even more efficient, JD.com has been able to contribute significant code to many important corporate projects, including Prometheus and Vitess.

  • You want some SUSE socks? We know you do; SUSE x KubeCon.

    Looking for socks? How about a nice, juicy, SUSE chameleon? If you’re going to KubeCon, you can get them. Stop by the SUSE booth, G17, and we’ll hook you up. After you’ve got yourself some socks and your very own SUSE chameleon, head on over to see Rob De Canha-Knight, EMEA Technical Strategist at SUSE, for his birds of a feather session on diversity and inclusion.

  • Welcoming WordPress 5.0 And The New Editor

    The major new version of WordPress scheduled for release today is a big deal, both anticipated and feared by those who rely on the world's most popular web publishing platform.

    WordPress is used by everyone from solo bloggers and small businesses to major publishers (including Forbes) and marketing organizations. Thomas Griffin has written here about How To Use WordPress As A SaaS Platform, the foundation of your own cloud software business. WordPress has a corporate backer, a private company called Automattic, but also benefits from open source code contributions from developers around the world.

    Part of what makes WordPress popular is that its open source foundation means you can get started with it "for free" and, equally important, you can extend or tweak its functionality to make it serve your needs. Editing the core software code is not a good idea because then it becomes challenging to preserve those changes if you ever upgrade, but most of the core functionality can be modified with plugins and themes, software modules that hook into a fairly well documented set of function calls. That is what makes WordPress a software platform, not merely a software product.

  • Basque Country open source ICT sector grows 8%

     

    The Basque Country government is sharing much of its software as open source; in 2017 it started doing this through its OpenApps Euskadi directory.

Play Tetris at your Linux terminal

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Thanks for joining us for today's installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself, what’s a command-line toy. Even I'm not quite sure, but generally, it could be a game or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

It's quite possible that some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.

I promised when I started this series I'd be including games, but so far I've neglected to, so let's fix that with today's selection: Tetris.

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AMD Adding New Vega 10 & Vega 20 IDs To Their Linux Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While we are looking forward to AMD's next-gen Navi architecture in 2019, it looks like the Vega family may be getting bigger soon.

Hot off finishing up the Radeon RX 590 Linux support as their new Polaris refresh, it looks like another Vega 20 part may be in the pipeline as well as multiple new Vega 10 SKUs.

Friday afternoon patches to the company's RadeonSI Mesa and AMDKFD/AMDGPU kernel drivers reveal some new PCI IDs. On top of the five "Vega 20" PCI IDs already part of the Linux driver, a 0x66A4 ID is being added. So far AMD has just announced the Radeon Instinct MI50 and MI60 accelerators as being built off Vega 20 with no consumer parts at this time. As with most new product generations, it doesn't necessarily mean AMD will be launching 5~6 Vega 20 products, but sometimes PCI IDs are reserved for pre-production hardware, the possibility of expanding the product line in the future, etc.

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Need a Linux Distro for Deep Learning Applications? Try Ubuntu

Filed under
Development
Ubuntu

If your target market is finance, healthcare, or manufacturing, you know AI, ML, and DL solutions in demand for use cases ranging from fraud detection and cancer screenings to industrial automation. There are also interest and backing for applications including language translation, chatbots and service bots, facial recognition, and self-driving cars. A major challenge that the developer has to overcome with these applications, however, is dealing with massive quantities of unstructured data including image, voice, and sound.

NVIDIA CUDA, which enables general computing on graphical processing units (GPUs), allow developers to increase the speed of their applications. You can use these graphics cards to Ubuntu with traditional PCI slots on motherboards or with external Thunderbolt adapters. In fact, NVIDIA’s DGX Systems for deep learning run on Ubuntu.

Canonical, which produces Ubuntu with the help of its community, has also worked with Google to develop Kubeflow, which simplifies the process of installing AI tools and framework, as well as making it easier to use GPUs.

In addition, Ubuntu’s extensive libraries, tutorials and examples related to AI, ML, and DL make it the preferred OS choice for these applications. Ubuntu is also known for the support it offers for the most recent versions of free open source platforms and software.

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Also: Fresh Snaps from November 2018

Devices That Run or Support GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Fanless, Kaby Lake industrial PC has IEC 61850-3 power protection

    Lanner’s fanless, Ubuntu-ready “LEC-3340” is a 3U rackmount edge server with 7th Gen Core and Xeon E3 CPUs aimed at power subsystems. It features IEC 61850-3 compliance, -40 to 70°C support, isolated serial interfaces, and ESD protection.

    In the new age of edge and fog computing, the line between embedded and server technology is growing ever fuzzier. Bridging the gap at the high end of our coverage purview is Lanner’s new LEC-3340 Consolidation Server, which despite the 3U rackmount form-factor and the high end Kaby Lake-H or Xeon-E3 foundation, is designed to run without a fan.

  • Rugged Coffee Lake panel-PCs run Intel’s OpenVINO AI toolkit

    IEI’s 15- to 24-inch, IP66-armored “PPC-F-Q370” panel-PCs offer 8th Gen Core CPUs with Intel’s OpenVINO AI toolkit plus 2x GbE, 8x USB 3.0, 4x PCIe, 4x SATA bays, and 2x M.2/NVMe slots.

    IEI announced a new panel-PC series based on Intel’s 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors that feature Intel’s OpenVINO toolkit for AI development. Designed for applications including machine vision, facial recognition, and product defect detection, the PPC-F-Q370 series includes 15-, 15.6-, 17-, 18.5-, 21.5-, and 23.8-inch 10-point multitouch PCAP touchscreens with anti-glare and IP66 front-panel protection. No OS support was listed, but Linux and Windows are likely to be supported.

  • Little Backup Box: Small but Useful Improvement

    I want my Raspberry Pi-based Little Backup Box to be simple and reliable. So I prefer not to tweak and enhance it too much. I do make occasional exceptions to that rule, though. Case in point, a Little Backup Box fork by David Mathias that has a few interesting features, including a progress indicator.

IBM, Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • IBM selling Lotus Notes/Domino business to HCL for $1.8B
  • IBM Sells Off Notes & Other Software You Barely Remember, for $1.8B - Light Reading
  • Red Hat fiddles with OpenShift Dedicated and lures customers with price cuts

    The team at Red Hat has continued its toiling in the Big Blue shadow of IBM, and has churned out some tweaks to its OpenShift Dedicated platform and also sliced a few prices for the Kubernetes service.

  • Simplifies Kubernetes on AWS, Cuts Prices

    Red Hat is simplifying deployments of its OpenShift managed Kubernetes service on Amazon Web Services, as well as cutting prices and rolling out other upgrades.

    OpenShift is Red Hat Inc. (NYSE: RHT)'s platform for managing and running containerized Kubernetes applications; it runs on the customer premises or on any of 300 cloud and service provider partners, including AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, IBM and Alibaba.

  • Kubernetes: Your Next Application Server

    In the Java ecosystem, we have historically been enamored with the concept of the “application server,” the runtime engine that not only gave us portable APIs such as JMS, JAX-RS, JSF, and EJB but also gave us critical runtime infrastructure for things such as farm deployments, configuration, load-balancing, failover, distributed management, and monitoring.

  • Lufthansa Technik builds digital foundation with Red Hat

    Lufthansa Technik, the world’s largest independent provider of airline maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) services, sought to create a digital platform for the aviation industry, AVIATAR. To support its development and operation, the company created a hybrid cloud infrastructure based on enterprise open source software from Red Hat. The AVIATAR team can now use agile DevOps approaches, automation, internal and third-party integration, and self-service capabilities to quickly iterate based on data and feedback. As a result, Lufthansa Technik provides an innovative digital platform that helps the world’s airlines optimise their operations.

  • Red Hat, Google: Open Source Collaboration
  • PHP version 5.6.39, 7.0.33, 7.1.24 and 7.2.12

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.13 are available in remi repository for Fedora 28-29 and in remi-php72 repository for Fedora 26-27 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPM of PHP version 7.1.25 are available in remi repository for Fedora 26-27 and in remi-php71 repository for Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPM of PHP version 7.0.33 are available in remi-php70 repository for Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPM of PHP version 5.6.39 are available in remi-php56 repository for Enterprise Linux.

    emblem-important-2-24.png

  • PHPUnit 7.5
  • FPgM report: 2018-49
  • Fedora rawhide – fixed bugs 2018/11

Security: Updates, ESET Post Turned to FUD, New Microsoft-Connected FUD, and SUSE CaaS Platform Patched

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Old and new OpenSSH backdoors threaten Linux servers [Ed: ESET is spreading/reusing/repurposing FUD against OpenSSH of the OpenBSD project. SSH itself is secure, but because some malicious actors make poisoned binaries with back doors we're supposed to fear; supply chains matter.]

    Nearly five years ago, ESET researchers helped to disrupt a 25 thousand-strong botnet of Linux machines that were saddled with an OpenSSH-based backdoor and credential stealer named Ebury. The attackers wielding it first performed a check if other SSH backdoors are present at the targeted system before deploying the malware.

    This spurred the researchers to search for and analyze these type of (server-side OpenSSH) backdoors.

    “Malicious OpenSSH binaries are quite common and have features that help us detect them among legitimate OpenSSH binaries. While, as soon as we got them, we used the samples collected to improve our detection, we only began sorting and analyzing them in 2018. Surprisingly, we discovered many new backdoor families that had never been documented before,” they noted in a recently released report detailing nine previously documented and 12 new OpenSSH malware families.

  • Feral Interactive Bringing DiRT 4 to Linux in 2019, Chrome 71 Blocks Ads on Abusive Sites, New Linux Malware Families Discovered, The Linux Foundation Launches the Automated Compliance Tooling Project, and GNU Guix and GuixSD 0.16.0 Released

    Cyber-security company ESET has discovered 21 "new" Linux malware families, and all of them "operate in the same manner, as trojanized versions of the OpenSSH client". ZDNet reports that "They are developed as second-stage tools to be deployed in more complex 'botnet' schemes. Attackers would compromise a Linux system, usually a server, and then replace the legitimate OpenSSH installation with one of the trojanized versions. ESET said that '18 out of the 21 families featured a credential-stealing feature, making it possible to steal passwords and/or keys' and '17 out of the 21 families featured a backdoor mode, allowing the attacker a stealthy and persistent way to connect back to the compromised machine.'"

  • Visibility is the key to prioritizing open source vulnerability remediations [Ed: TechRadar entertains anti-FOSS firm whose sole contribution is FUD because it tries to sell some 'solution'. The author writes about his own firm that also collaborates with Microsoft on this FUD.]
  • SUSE CaaS Platform Updated to Address Kubernetes Vulnerability

    For an open source project of its size (both in terms of code and of prevalence of adoption), Kubernetes has been surprisingly free of security vulnerabilities. Its perfect record has come to an end, though, with the project’s disclosure on December 3, 2018 of a security vulnerability in all previous versions of Kubernetes, and therefore, of SUSE CaaS Platform.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • The Case for Data-Driven Open Source Development

    Every year the number of Open Source companies and developer communities continues to grow. Open Source is becoming the de facto standard for software development as companies realize the cost, agility and innovation benefits. In addition to embracing Linux, Microsoft recently open sourced its entire patent portfolio to all member of the Open Invention Network. Companies are not only hiring engineers based on their Open Source Software (OSS) knowledge but also allocating 100 percent of their time to external projects. As a result, these projects quality and feature sets improve significantly which further accelerates their adoption in the enterprise. Very successful Open Source projects such as Kubernetes have helped define best practices for contributions (both technical and non-technical), communication (both online and offline), openness (Summits, Special Interest Groups, etc.) and governance (maintainer-ship, Technical Advisory Board, etc.). No need to reinvent the wheel, there are well-established frameworks for companies to work with.

    There is, however, one major problem that needs to be addressed: the lack of standardized metrics, datasets, methodologies and tools for extracting insights from Open Source projects is real.

  • In support of Coraline Ada Ehmke

    Last night, the linux.org DNS was hijacked and redirected to a page that doxed her. Coraline is doing extremely valuable work with the Contributor Covenant code of conduct, which many free software projects have adopted already.

  • Focusing on the simple things

    Which I guess shows that I could've spent the time thinking about an interesting concept on more pragmatic things, like testing the surveil script on another machine.

    Finally, I'm looking for a way to do testing; and I'm wondering of a good way to test that the command-line interface functions as expected as well.

  • Introducing PySide2 (Qt for Python) Snap Runtime

    Lately at Crossbar.io, we have been PySide2 for an internal project. Last week it reached a milestone and I am now in the process of code cleanup and refactoring as we had to rush quite a few things for that deadline. We also create a snap package for the project, our previous approach was to ship the whole PySide2 runtime (170mb+) with the Snap, it worked but was a slow process, because each new snap build involved downloading PySide2 from PyPI and installing some deb dependencies.

  • Quick Tip: SQLAlchemy for MySQL and Pandas

    For years I’ve used the mysql-python library for connecting to mysql databases. It’s worked well for me over the years but there are times when you need speed and/or better connection management that what you get with mysql-python. That’s where SQLAlchemy comes in.

    Before diving into this, if you are doing things that aren’t dependent on speed (e.g., it doesn’t matter if it takes 1 second to connect to the database and grab your data and close the database) then you can easily ignore this tip. That said, if you have multiple connections, that connect time can add up.

    For example, I recently had an issue where it was taking 4.5+ seconds to connect to a database, run analysis and spit out the results. That’s not terrible if its something for you only but if its a production system and speed is a requirement, that might be too long (and it IS too long).

  • Mopidy-MPRIS 2.0 released

    I’ve released Mopidy-MPRIS 2.0, the first major update to Mopidy-MPRIS in about 3.5 years.

    Mopidy-MPRIS is a Mopidy extension that makes Mopidy controllable from other programs on the same machine through D-Bus. This makes it possible to control Mopidy from various widgets in GNOME/KDE/etc, as well as with keyboard media keys.

  • I'm moving to the Red Hat OpenJDK team

    I'm very excited to announce that I've moved roles within Red Hat: I am now part of the OpenJDK team!

  • DataExplore – free Python based data plotting and analysis software

    DataExplore is an open source desktop application for data analysis and plotting intended for use in both research and education. It’s targeted at non-programmers who want to perform fairly advanced table manipulation methods. It also offers fast, dynamic plot creation from selected data suitable for publication. A variety of table analysis tools are provided.

    The software seeks to bridge the gap between graphical interface and command driven or programmatic approaches to data analysis. If you find it daunting to use RStudio, DataExplore might be a perfect fit.

    The software is written in Python and is based on the PyData suite of Python libraries. It works with Python 2.7 and <=3.4. It relies on pandas and matplotlib.

    The program allows quick visualization of data, table manipulation tools and supports large data tables. One advantage is the ability to load and work with relatively large tables as compared to spreadsheets. The focus is on data manipulation rather than data entry though cell editing and row/column changes are supported.

  • Automatic continuous development and delivery of a hybrid mobile app

    This makes Node.js an appealing option. Node.js is a JavaScript runtime built on the Chrome V8 JavaScript engine. It can make the API development backend very fast and easy, and it integrates fully with web technologies. You can develop a Cordova plugin, using your Node.js backend, internally in your hybrid app, as I did with the nodejs-cordova-plugin. This plugin, following the Cordova guidelines, integrates a mobile-compatible version of the Node.js platform to provide a full-stack mobile app.

  • Test and Code: 56: Being a Guest on a Podcast - Michael Kennedy
  • Episode #189: War Stories of the Developer Evangelists
  • EuroPython 2019: Venue and location selected
  • Create the about scene for pygame project
  • Seaborn Library for Data Visualization in Python: Part 2
  • Supercell opening new coding school (without teachers or classes)

    Instead, the project has been modelled on pioneering French school École 42. The three-year study program relies on peer-to-peer learning, with students organised into teams and tasked with various projects to demonstrate their skills.

    [...]

    However, the initial applications are only open to those aged between 18 and 30. Given the industry's ongoing battle against ageism, GamesIndustry.biz has reached out to Supercell to see if this will be expanded in future.

  • Supercell clashes games skill shortage with free new coding school

    Applications for the program opened this month, with the first 100 successful applicants due to start in September 2019. The course takes a total of three years to complete and is inspired by Paris-based nonprofit school Ecole 42.

Graphics: NVIDIA, Allwinner and Intel

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 415.22 Linux Driver Adds Mainline Support For Vulkan Transform Feedback

    NVIDIA has released an updated stable 415 series Linux driver today. While normally their stable driver updates aren't too exciting compared to the beta development releases, this update is notable for adding VK_EXT_transform_feedback.

  • NVIDIA driver 415.22 is out for Linux, finally adding Transform Feedback support

    Finally, after waiting for a few months NVIDIA has released a new mainline driver which includes Transform Feedback support. Previously, you had to use their special Vulkan beta driver to get it.

    The "VK_EXT_transform_feedback" extension is one that was made especially for helping support translation layers from other 3D APIs. In our case, it helps DXVK plus Wine (and so Valve's Steam Play) with certain Windows games when run on Linux.

  • Cedrus Video Decode Driver Moving Along With Allwinner H5/A64 Support

    With the Linux 4.20 kernel the Cedrus VPU decoder driver was mainlined that was developed this year over at Bootlin for providing open-source accelerated video support for Allwinner SoCs. That driver continues to be ramped up to increase its usefulness.

  • Intel GVT Might Introduce Coffeelake Support In Linux 4.22

    While Coffeelake processors have been available for a year now, Intel initially didn't intend to support their open-source Graphics Virtualization Technology (GVT) with these chips but now are in the process of bringing up such support.

    This feature request has been tracking the Coffeelake GVT-g support request the past year. Initially they didn't intend to support Coffeelake nor Cannonlake but were focusing resources on Icelake and maintaining the existing Skylake/Kabylake support for this tech that allows KVM/Xen virtual machines to access the Intel HD/UHD Graphics hardware.

Games: Beyond Blue, The Stanley Parable: Ultra Deluxe, DiRT 4, Blackout and EmptyEpsilon

Filed under
Gaming
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