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Friday, 18 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Integrate Summernote Editor in Django application

    In this tutorial, we will learn how to integrate Summernote WYSIWYG Editor in Django Application.

  • wxPython by Example: Adding Icons to the Title Bar (Video)

    In this video tutorial, you will learn how to add icons to your wxPython application’s title bar. This is a nice feature to add to your application to give your program some branding.

  • Teach Python with Jupyter Notebooks

    Some things about the Ruby community have always impressed me. Two examples are the commitment to testing and the emphasis on making it easy to get started. The best example of both is Ruby Koans, where you learn Ruby by fixing tests.

    With the amazing tools we have for Python, we should be able to do something even better. We can. Using Jupyter Notebook, PyHamcrest, and just a little bit of duct tape-like code, we can make a tutorial that includes teaching, code that works, and code that needs fixing.

    First, some duct tape. Usually, you do your tests using some nice command-line test runner, like pytest or virtue. Usually, you do not even run it directly. You use a tool like tox or nox to run it. However, for Jupyter, you need to write a little harness that can run the tests directly in the cells.

  • Nathan Piccini Data Science Dojo Blog: Building a Chatbot with Google DialogFlow

    DialogFlow is a natural language understanding platform (based on Google’s AI) that makes it easy to design and integrate a conversational user interface into your mobile app, web application, device, bot, interactive voice response system, and so on. Using DialogFlow, you can provide new and engaging ways for users to interact with your product.

Android Leftovers

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Android

Kate and the Tab Bar - Release 20.12

Filed under
KDE

Kate did a long time not have tabbing. My initial design was a MDI editor with a list/treeview for the file selection.

We had splitting very soon and some when in-between we had tabs around the split areas (like in good old Konqueror). But we had no tabs for documents. The tabbing for the split views was removed again later, as close to nobody understood or even found it.

Here is some good old Kate, (alias Kant) screenshot from the good old KDE 2.2 times.

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Best Free and Open Source Media Centers

Filed under
OSS

The majority of Linux distributions come supplied with a wide range of software that lets individuals use their PC to watch movies and television programs, listen to a music collection, and view photos. However, if you are looking for a more harmonious approach, turning your Linux box into a state of the art media center with an integrated easy-to-use interface, media center software will be just the ticket.

In the media center department, Linux has a fairly narrow range to choose from. Fortunately, the software featured in this article ticks all the boxes. We have also chosen to include some distributions which are dedicated media centers, as they significantly simplify the installation process particularly on esoteric hardware. At the heart of each of these distributions is Kodi.

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Open Usage Commons: Google’s Initiative to Manage Trademark for Open Source Projects Runs into Controversy

Filed under
Google
OSS

Back in July, Google announced a new organization named Open Usage Commons. The aim of the organization is to help “projects protect their project identity through programs such as trademark management and usage guidelines”.

Google believes that “creating a neutral, independent ownership for these trademarks gives contributors and consumers peace of mind regarding their use of project names in a fair and transparent way”.

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Pinephone Multiboot Image Boots 13 Different Linux Distributions

Filed under
OS
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

You’ve certainly heard about dual-boot systems with Windows and Linux, and possibly about triple-boot systems with an extra OS like Chromium OS or Android, but pine64’s forum user Mengo has gone much further with a multiboot image for Pinephone able to boot 13 different Linux distributions!

You’d think the image would occupy a lot of space on the device, but since all 13 distributions share the same Linux 5.9 kernel, all 13 operating systems fit on the internal eMMC flash or a MicroSD card with 8GB or greater capacity.

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Devices and Open Hardware

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • ACEINNA Launches OpenIMU ROS Driver for Development of Robotic Navigation Systems

    The Robotic Operating System (ROS) is a set of software libraries and tools that help developers create robotics applications. It can be described as a software development kit (SDK). As stated on ROS.org : "The ROS user community builds on top of a common infrastructure to provide an integration point that offers access to hardware drivers, generic robot capabilities, development tools, useful external libraries, and more." This allows users to get their robotics projects up and running a lot faster than starting from scratch.

  • Binary Images Optimized for Your Embedded Device

    Embedded systems developers have usually had two choices when setting off to create exciting new devices based on Linux and built using the latest embedded SOCs. Use a binary distribution typically optimized for laptops, desktops and servers and hope it either fits or painstakingly customize it. Use an embedded Linux product which makes customization easy but has a rather large learning curve and doesn't have an easy way to even determine if the learning curve is worth the journey.

    Wind River Linux now provides access to binary images of our industry leading embedded Linux OS, allowing you to get the best of both worlds. Binary images, which are optimized for embedded devices, are available to be used for deploying on your embedded device and keeping it up to date. Or these same images can be used to try out on your embedded device to evaluate the capabilities of Wind River Linux while you ease into the workflow required to use our source based embedded Linux product.

  • Raspberry Pi lookalike showcases i.MX8M Mini

    Avnet’s $72.50 “MaaxBoard Mini” SBC offers Linux and Android images to run on an i.MX8M Mini with 2GB DDR4, GbE, 4x USB 2.0, MIPI DSI- and -CSI, WiFi/BT, and 40-pin GPIO.

    A year ago, Avnet’s Embest unit launched a $60 MaaXBoard SBC featuring NXP’s i.MX8M. We missed the company’s July announcement of the promised, i.MX8M Mini based MaaxBoard Mini, but since the board did not receive wide coverage, we figure better late than never.

  • IP69K-Rated Stainless Steel Panel PCs Run Windows 10 or Ubuntu 16.04

    There are already several industrial dust and waterproof panel PCs on the market, but with its Intel Apollo Lake powered Titan-AL Series, ADLINK goes a step further with IP69K-rated stainless steel panel PCs that provide resistance against corrosion from all sort of chemicals.

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  • Magpie MIDI is an adaptive harmonica-style computer interface

    For those with certain physical restrictions, interfacing with a computer can be a difficult task. As a possible solution, Shu Takahashi and Pato Montalvo have come up with the Magpie MIDI hands-free interface. The adaptive tool, inspired in part by a harmonica, has 13 air holes that enable its user to “sip” and “puff” all 26 letters of the alphabet.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Distribution kernel for Gentoo

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo

The Gentoo Distribution Kernel project is excited to announce that our new Linux Kernel packages are ready for a wide audience!

The project aims to create a better Linux Kernel maintenance experience by providing both ebuilds that can be used to configure, compile, and install kernel entirely through the package manager as well as prebuilt binary kernels.

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Librem 5 on Privacy

Filed under
Gadgets

  • Tourists on Tech’s Toll Roads

    I had assumed the toll would be $1 or so–everything else up to that point had been relatively affordable in Cancun–but was shocked when I slowed down and discovered the toll was $10! This was about three times what the Golden Gate Bridge charged back then! I felt taken advantage of, yet once we got to the toll booth, there was no easy way to turn around or avoid it, so we just paid the fee and I blamed myself for being a dumb tourist who should have researched things better.

    We spent the day in Chichen Itza and on the way back I vowed I would not be taken advantage of again. This time we would take the indirect, free route through the jungle. I was so glad I made that choice as I passed through one village after another and saw local people living their lives. While it wasn’t as fast or smooth a road as the toll road, I felt like less of a tourist on a curated tour of someone else’s property and more like I was seeing what “real” Cancun was like.

  • GPS Tuning the Librem 5 Hardware

    Society is getting pretty used to the idea that the data and applications on phones are completely controlled by large corporations.

    Purism is working hard to change that with the Librem 5.

    Because of the market capitalization and duopoly control of the phone OS vendors, the hardware tool vendors use are trapped into one of those two OSes (Android or iOS).

    [...]

    The available GPS antenna tuning procedure is a GPS simulator, but the simulator requires feedback from the phone OS to help tune the antenna. If you are on Android the simulator vendor provides an apk that converts the NMEA to a format that the tools can use to do the tuning.

    So now we have a tool to do the tuning but no way to use it.

Wiki.js: A Modern Open-source Wiki Engine for the Enterprise\

Filed under
OSS

Whenever there is a mention of a Wiki, the first thing that always come to thoughts is: Wikipedia.org. So first let's draw a like between Wiki and Wikipedia.

A Wiki is a software that built to ease collaborative writing and editing processes for teams. They are designed with a specific goal to provide productive writing environment for writers and editors, as well as a set of management tools for moderators and managers.

Wikis have been around since the dawn of the modern internet as we knew it, and the most popular Wiki system is MediaWiki which Wikipedia uses.

Over the years we used many wiki engines in work, starting from MediaWiki, DokuWiki, PmWiki, Wikkawiki, and TiddlyWiki. All of them are still popular wiki engines with loyal communities.

[...]

Wiki.js is a fully customizable and modular wiki engine written entirely in JavaScript. It comes with a rich set of features, and works smoothly on different systems and environments.

It's also a blazing fast web application, with an eye-candy design, furthermore, It supports many database interfaces with primary support for PostgreSQL (Note that the other database engines may be dropped in the next major release).

With a developer-friendly tool set, developer can integrate Wiki.js with any existing system as they can build modules, and create custom themes for it.

Wiki.js is a perfect solution for scientists, researchers, business managers, writers, historians, software developers and technical writers. It's also a polished solution for the enterprise. Here in this article we will explain why.

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Switch to Linux with these top distros

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Regular contributor Jon Honeyball has fallen for the charms of Linux Mint – and we can understand why – but Mint is far from the only flavour on offer. Each distro has a different style and skillset, with variants to suit every taste.

In this instance, we’re more interested in usability than we are in raw numbers, as this is about the computing experience as much as it’s about what you can do with each OS.

Moreover, we’ve cut each candidate greater slack than we’d usually be prepared to do. We had issues with each distro – without exception – when installing them on our current-specification laptop, spanning wobbly Wi-Fi, touchpads that stopped working, mute speakers and, in some cases, distributions that wouldn’t install at all.

This is by no means an unusual occurrence in the world of Linux, which often works on a system of trial and error. Linux has a reputation as being the sole province of hardcore tech-heads, and while that's not quite true any more, it certainly not for the faint of heart, and we'd advise anyone who's worried about using a command-line interface to turn back now.

The winner, then, isn’t so much the quantifiably “best” open-source operating system on test, but rather the one we’d be most likely to stick with if it was time to wave goodbye to Windows altogether.

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Fragments – A Modern BitTorrent Client for Gnome Desktop

Filed under
Software
GNOME

Fragments is an open-source GTK+ 3 BitTorrent client with a modern and easy to use user interface.

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today's OSS leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Tracy Miranda Joins CD Foundation as New Executive Director

    In Miranda's previous role at CloudBees, she served as the Director of Open Source Community. She has used her impressive technical, community building, writing and speaking skills to improve the Jenkins, JenkinsX, and CI/CD developer community. The CDF welcomes her extensive experience and excitement as we work to establish best practices and industry specifications for the world's fastest growing projects.

    Join the CD Foundation for a two-day virtual event, CDCon Oct 7-8, focused on improving the world's capacity to deliver software with security and speed. Become part of the conversation that drives continuous delivery by meeting peers, sharing ideas, and talking to industry leaders on all things software delivery and DevOps.

  • How Free Software Powers Cloud Services

    For a long time, there was a hard-and-fast division between two legal classes of software. Free or open source software could be copied, changed, and redistributed. Proprietary or closed software was closely controlled by the vendor, and its use was encumbered with restrictions. There are other categories of software that lie somewhere between these two extremes (such as software that can be viewed but not changed and redistributed). In this article, however, we stick to the categories of free and proprietary and explore the relationship between cloud services and free software.

  • WordPress Sites Attacked in Their Millions

    Wordfence, which itself produces a plugin for the platform, revealed news of the zero-day bug at the start of September. It affects File Manager which, as the name suggests, is a plugin that helps users to manage files on their WordPress sites.

    The plugin is installed on around 700,000 WordPress sites, and although Wordfence estimates that only around 37%, or 262,0000, are still running a vulnerable version, this hasn’t stopped attackers from trying their luck against a much larger number of users.

  • LibreOffice and Google Summer of Code 2020: The results

    This year, LibreOffice was once again a mentoring organization in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) a global programme focused on bringing more student developers into free and open source software development. We ran six projects – and all were finished successfully. Students and mentors enjoyed the time, and here we present some of the achievements, which should make their way into LibreOffice 7.1 in early February 2021!

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Markdown

    Markdown is a plain text formatting syntax created by John Gruber in 2004. It’s designed to be easy-to-read and easy-to-write.

    Readability is at the very heart of Markdown. It offers the advantages of plain text, provides a convenient format for writing for the web, but it’s not intended to be a replacement for HTML. Markdown is a writing format, not a publishing format. You control the display of the document; formatting words as bold or italic, adding images, and creating lists are just a few of the things we can do with Markdown. Mostly, Markdown is just regular text with a few non-alphabetic characters included, such as # or *.

  • Tarsnap – cleaning up old backups

    This is a great example of Tarsnap deduplication and compression. I have 5 years of backups taking up only 96G and the latest backup is 113G.

  • login_ldap added to -current

    The code is based login_ldap port, but uses our own aldap implementation instead of openldap.

  • How young people can run their computer programs in space with Astro Pi
  • Git Essentials

    While Git tools and add-ons abound, these seven utilities can help any user make the most of Git.

    Git, the version control system originally written by Linus Torvalds, is one of the most widely used Linux commands. Like other popular commands, such as apt or vim, an entire ecosystem of tools has grown up around it. In fact, Debian’s stable repository alone lists over 60 secondary tools whose names start with “git” and around 70 with unique names.

  • 2020.37 Fundamentally Raku

    Want to quickly learn about the fundamentals of Raku with a book? Raku Fundamentals by Moritz Lenz has just arrived on the physical bookshelves as well as on the virtual ones. Formerly known as “Perl 6 Fundamentals”, the second edition has been completely updated and has a chapter on Cro web services added. Be sure to leave a review when you have become the owner of a copy!

  • Zydeco::Lite

    Today I released Zydeco::Lite, a re-implementation of Zydeco but just using standard Perl syntax. So for example, class { ... } becomes class(sub { ...});.

    This has the advantage of much faster compile time, similar run time speed, fewer dependencies, and compatibility with older versions of Perl before the keyword API was introduced. Of course, in some circumstances these aren't important concerns, so the nicer syntax of the full Zydeco will be preferred.

  • Deploying serverless Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift, Part 1

    Red Hat OpenShift Serverless recently became GA, and with it came new options for application deployment. This article introduces one of those new options, Knative Serving. I provide an overview of OpenShift Serverless and Knative Serving, then show you how to deploy a Node.js application as a Knative Serving service.

  • OpenJDK 15 Reaches GA With Garbage Collector Promotions, Tossing Out Solaris + SPARC

    OpenJDK 15 is out today as the latest general availability release for this open-source Java implementation.

This PinePhone Multi-Distro Image Lets You Run 13 Distros on the Linux Phone

Filed under
Linux

Created by developed Ondřej Jirman, the 13 in 1 multi-distro demo image includes 13 different Linux distributions made specifically for the PinePhone Linux phone. Why demo image? Simply because it lets you try all these distros without having to install them on the device.

The PinePhone multi-distro demo image currently includes the following distributions: Arch Linux ARM, KDE Neon, Lune OS, Maemo Leste, Mobian, postmarketOS with fbkeyboard, postmarketOS with GNOME, postmarketOS with Phosh, postmarketOS with Plasma Mobile, postmarketOS with sxmo, PureOS, Sailfish OS, and Ubuntu Touch.

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KDE Akademy 2020 Recap

Filed under
KDE

By and large the technical infrastructure, both of the event and my own, held up. Over the course of the event a number of ideas for improving remote event experience came up though, such as those for Plasma collected in task T13570.

Some of the important social interactions during a physical events are missing at a virtual event, the creation of the hallway BBB rooms helped a lot with this though. It’s still not the same as having dinner with a small group for example, but it nevertheless enabled discussions on random topics, fun and hacking for hours after the official schedule had ended for the day.

Another very positive aspect is that the virtual setup not only enabled many people to participate that otherwise might not have been able to attend at all, but also let people say hello again that weren’t that active in recent years.

As said before we should find a way to retain remote participation in post-pandemic physical events for this reason.

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Also: Presenting Kontrast

Graphics Leftovers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Graphics Driver Patches Revived For Per-Client Engine Activity

    One of the interesting Intel Linux graphics driver patches to be sent out last year were for per-client engine reporting to allow on a per-application/process basis to see how the GPU's render/blitter/video engines were being utilized.

    That work for per-client "engine busyness" reporting went through a few rounds of review but as of Linux 5.9 there still isn't the support within Intel's i915 kernel driver.

  • Vulkan Present Timing Extension With Aim To Avoid Stuttering

    The Vulkan System Integration working group has decided to publish their work-in-progress extension on VK_EXT_present_timing as their effort to expose the presentation engine's display details and better allow scheduling a present to happen at a specific time.

    VK_EXT_present_timing is a big effort about helping to reduce stuttering and use-cases like better handling of variable refresh rate setups and other scenarios in wanting to ensure the presentation of a frame/image happens on schedule to avoid anomalies.

  • Intel Graphics Compiler 1.0.4944 Brings Many Minor Optimizations

    The Intel Graphics Compiler (IGC) that is used by their Linux OpenCL/Level-Zero compute stack as well as now being used by their Windows graphics driver and potentially their Linux OpenGL/Vulkan drivers in the future is out with a new release.

    IGC releases tend to come frequent with a large team working on this open-source graphics compiler code while the 1.0.4944 milestone is a bit of a larger release.

  • X.Org Developer's Conference 2020

    After DebConf, Linux Plumbers and Akademy, the lineup of great virtual conferences continues this week with the 2020 edition of X.Org Developer's Conference (XDC), the leading event for developers working on all things Open graphics, including the Linux kernel, Mesa, DRM, Wayland and X11.

    Taking place entirely online for the first time, XDC 2020 brings a packed schedule of talks, workshops and lightning talks spread out over three days. Collaborans will giving two presentations & a lightning talk during the week, for which you can find full details below. The entire conference will be live-streamed on YouTube (Day 1, Day 2 & Day 3), however if you would like to take part in any of the discussions, there's still time to register (free of charge)!

  • AMD Radeon Navi 2 / VCN 3.0 Supports AV1 Video Decoding

    It turns out the Radeon RX 6000 series will have AV1 hardware video decode capabilities.

    In addition to Intel Xe / Tigerlake and the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 series supporting AV1 hardware decoding, it's now firmed up that the next-gen Navi 2 GPUs will also have AV1 decode.

    As previously reported, the AMD next-gen GPUs feature VCN 3.0 for Video Core Next. The previous VCN 3.0 Linux/open-source patches didn't reveal AV1 capabilities but new patches out today confirm AV1 support with VCN3.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Arm Officially Supports Panfrost Open-Source Mali GPU Driver Development

Most GPU drivers found in Arm processors are known to be closed-source making it difficult and time-consuming to fix some of the bugs since everybody needs to rely on the silicon vendor to fix those for them, and they may even decide a particular bug is not important to them, so you’d be out of luck. So the developer community has long tried to reverse-engineer GPU drivers with projects like Freedreno (Qualcomm Adreno), Etnaviv (Vivante), as well as Lima and Panfrost for Arm Mali GPUs. Several years ago, Arm management was not interested at all collaborating with open-source GPU driver development for Mali GPUs, but as noted by Phoronix, Alyssa Rosenzweig, a graphics software engineer employed by Collabora, explained Panfrost development was now done in partnership with Arm during a talk at the annual X.Org Developers’ Conference (XDC 2020). Read more

Open Up: Open Source Hardware — A Chat with Carl

From a broader lens, to produce “open source hardware” means that we have developed and shared the recipe to create a high-end commercial product that can be learned from, adapted, and used by anyone else. In the same way we’ve stood on the shoulders of the Linux and open source software giants who came before us, we now get to be pioneers in developing open source hardware for those who come next. If you want to learn more how a computer is designed or how something is made, our schematics are the instructions for how to do it. It describes every step of the process, from each piece of the machine and its dimensions, to the type of aluminum used and how to bend it. It’s similar to open source software in that you can learn from the product, adapt it to your needs, and distribute it. The difference is that it requires outside equipment to produce your own version. Open hardware has become more accessible with 3-D printing, but as we found when we were making acrylic prototypes of Thelio, you reach a point where it’s time to work with metal, which presents its own challenges. You have to cut it, bend it, and paint it, all of which requires specific equipment. Read more

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