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Thursday, 24 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry A Fishy Tale harshasrisri 01/05/2011 - 2:11pm
Blog entry Ubuntu 11.10: Screenshot preview finid 11/07/2011 - 8:09am
Blog entry Mandriva Desktop 2011 teaser finid 1 05/07/2011 - 2:40am
Blog entry Mozilla forms partnership with Tylenol Texstar 02/07/2011 - 1:04am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS KDE 2011.6 post installation tips. Texstar 28/06/2011 - 5:57am
Blog entry Welcome to the Jungle srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 8:24pm
Blog entry Truths srlinuxx 23/06/2011 - 6:30pm
Blog entry weirdness: puppy & wd-40 srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:07am
Blog entry BIOS Flash update under linux. gfranken 02/06/2011 - 7:55pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 2011 - Preview Graphics Texstar 9 03/06/2011 - 2:13am

Fedora: Fedora Modularity, Radeon Open Compute (ROCm), MongoDB

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Why did Fedora Modularity fail in 2017? A brief reflection

    For the ISTE-430 Information Requirements Modelling course at the Rochester Institute of Technology, students are asked to analyze an example of a failed software project and write a short summary on why it failed. For the assignment, I evaluated the December 2017 announcement on Fedora Modularity. I thought it was an interesting example of a project that experienced initial difficulty but re-calibrated and succeeded in the end. And it is a project I am biased towards, as a Fedora user and sysadmin.

    I thought sharing it on my blog might be interesting for others. Don’t read into this too much – it was a quick analysis from a single primary source and a few secondary references.

  • Some Radeon ROCm Packages Pending Review For Fedora

    Earlier this month was word that Fedora developers were looking at packaging Radeon Open Compute (ROCm) to make it easier for their distribution users to enjoy this open-source Radeon GPU computing software from OpenCL to a TensorFlow port. Some of the early packages of ROCm are now under review for Fedora.

  • A Red Hat-backed open source project warns that a controversial new plan to take on Amazon and other tech titans is only causing 'Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt'

    Open source software companies like MongoDB are making drastic moves to protect their intellectual property from cloud giants like Amazon or Alibaba — but a clash between MongoDB and $31 billion software giant Red Hat highlights the potential pitfalls of that strategy.

    Fedora, a Red Hat-sponsored open source operating system, has dropped support for the very popular MongoDB database. Although Fedora is sponsored by Red Hat, and has project leaders who work at Red Hat, it's technically a separately-run open source project. Fedora cited concerns over the company's controversial new licensing agreement, and indeed, Fedora has tacked MongoDB's SSPL onto its "bad license" list.

    This comes months after Red Hat, which is on the cusp of being acquired by IBM, removed MongoDB support from its Red Hat Enterprise Linux OS in November.

Security: Bogdan Popa's Latest Microsoft FUD, Banks With Windows, Huawei Scare, and It's Possible to Install Malicious Things on Google

Filed under
Security
  • Linux Virus Removes Security Software to Mine Monero [Ed: Bogdan Popa, "Microsoft News Editor" (basically the Microsoft PR/propagandist of Softpedia), only ever writes about GNU/Linux to attack it. Here too he uses a misleading title, a provocative headline and picture. These are already-compromised machines. It's not a "Linux" issue per se. So yeah... Microsoft loves Linux... Linux FUD.]
  • Hackers Wield Commoditized Tools to Pop West African Banks

    Symantec says. Attackers also used an open source, remote administration tool for Windows called UltraVNC, then infected systems with Cobalt Strike malware, which can also provide backdoors onto PCs and download additional malware. "Communication with the C&C server was handled by dynamic DNS infrastructure, which helped shield the location of the attackers."

  • Huawei and Apple smartphones are both made in China, so what is the difference?

    Do Huawei phones really pose that much more of a security risk than iPhones in the face of China's potential espionage threat? A

  • Google Play malware used phones’ motion sensors to conceal itself

    Malicious apps hosted in the Google Play market are trying a clever trick to avoid detection—they monitor the motion-sensor input of an infected device before installing a powerful banking trojan to make sure it doesn’t load on emulators researchers use to detect attacks.

  • New Android Malware Uses Motion Sensors To Stay Hidden

    ecurity measures are not the only ones seeing improvements! Malicious apps are also figuring out new ways to enhance its working, and one such Android malware proves this.

Raspberry Pi with extra punch: New Orange Pi 3 packs powerful Allwinner H6 from $30

Filed under
Linux

Orange Pi maker Shenzhen Xunlong Software has launched the Allwinner H6-based development board Orange Pi 3, offering a new rival to the Raspberry Pi 3.

The Orange Pi 3 follows the company's previous Allwinner H6 boards, the Orange Pi Lite 2 and Orange Pi One Plus, but offers more features and more than 1GB or RAM.

The Orange Pi 3 is available with up to 2GB of RAM, the option of adding 8GB eMMC flash storage, as well as Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, two double USB 3.0 ports, Bluetooth 5.0, and a USB 2.0 port.

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Tizen: Update and Support Drop

Filed under
Linux
  • Samsung Gear S3 gets massive software update to Tizen 4.0. S Health and other Improvements

    Today, The Samsung Gear S3 smartwatch has received a MASSIVE software update to Tizen 4.0. This is a firmware upgrade that many users have been waiting for, with hopes of better battery life and features. This update also helps them keep up with the competition – In this case the Galaxy Watch. We have Installed the update and seen the features, now wait to see how battery life holds out.

  • Gear Sport also gets updated to Tizen 4.0, following Gear S3

    This morning Gear S3 rejoiced as their device received Tizen 4.0. Well, Gear Sport users can now join in with the festivities as their device has also received an update very similar to the one released for the S3.

  • Tizen Studio 3.1 released, drops support for 32 bit Windows and Ubuntu

    Tizen Studio, the all-in-one solution for Tizen app development has been updated to version 3.1. The latest version doesn’t bring much changes in the functionality or features, but it fixes a number of bugs from previous releases. Also, the latest release ends support for 32 bit host for Windows and Ubuntu. Tizen Studio 3.0, with some key improvements, was released late in October last year.

Games: Age of Fear, Sparticles, Deadly Days, Night of the Blood Moon, ATOM RPG, Sunless Skies, Overwatch

Filed under
Gaming
  • Age of Fear: The Free World, a free fantasy turn-based strategy game

    For those in need of their next turn-based strategy game, the Age of Fear series now has a free entry for you to test the waters.

  • Sparticles, a fast-paced platformer that reveals hidden terrain with particle explosions is now on Linux

    We have a lot of platformers, however Sparticles is one that looks incredibly unique visually due to the hidden terrain mechanic. It looks very colourful and really quite interesting.

  • Deadly Days, the strategic zombie survival rogue-lite has continued to evolve into a better game

    There's a number of Early Access game that I'm keeping a close eye on for having a huge amount of promise, Deadly Days is one such title that has come along very nicely recently.

    It's what the developers are calling a 'unique strategic zombie survival rogue-lite' and that's a pretty reasonable description. You loosely control a group of survivors during the apocalypse and it's your job to oversee their survival. You have 15 days to scavenge what you can, in the hopes of finding some medicine to prevent them turning.

  • Night of the Blood Moon, a cramped Nuclear Throne-like shooter is now in Early Access

    Night of the Blood Moon from sole developer Tyler McDermott is a cramped and quite interesting action game that feels like a twin-stick shooter inspired by the likes of Nuclear Throne. It was funded on Kickstarter back in August last year with 179 backers helping it become a reality.

  • ATOM RPG, the Fallout-like game now has a full tutorial starting area and more

    The developers behind the Fallout-inspired ATOM RPG certainly have been busy since releasing it in December.

    While the game is pretty damn good, I've no doubt about that, there is one part it could have done better which is the introduction. Previously, it put you into the game with a small fight scene and you were left to your own devices.

  • Sunless Skies is steaming ahead towards release, UI overhaul is out

    Sunless Skies from Failbetter Games is leaving Early Access on January 31st and it recently had a pretty big UI overhaul.

  • I’m in shock at just how well Overwatch runs with the latest DXVK and Lutris

    You might remember, that back in September last year I talked a little about Lutris and Overwatch [Official Site] together and how it was working well. Here’s an update on how it’s been going.

    Overwatch, developed by Blizzard, is an online team-based shooter that feels a lot like Team Fortress 2 from Valve. However, as much as I’ve tried to get into TF2 it just doesn’t stick. TF2 feels like it has no identity, it feels…bland.

    Overwatch on the other hand, is an incredibly exciting experience and I’m still very much a beginner. It has a pretty loud and proud identity, along with various animated shorts which help to suck you into the world. It’s something friends play practically religiously too, so it’s one of those times where I’ve felt a bit left out, well—no more!

    When I tried it previously back in September last year, the performance was pretty good. Fast-forward multiple months, a few new versions of DXVK have come along and the experience is mind-blowing. I don’t want to oversell it, but seriously it’s so smooth I completely forget that the work done to get it working on Linux wasn’t done by Blizzard directly.

Testing Ubuntu, Linux Mint Debian Edition, openSUSE Leap and more Linux distributions on my new laptop

Filed under
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

In my previous post, I described loading five different Linux distributions onto my new Acer Aspire 5. In this post, I will add four more. But first I would like to add a bit more information about the laptop itself; I have been using it for a week, and I am quite pleased and impressed with it.

First, it is quite fast, it boots Tumbleweed in less than 30 seconds, for example. Battery life is good, too; the specifications say approximately seven hours, and in continuous real-life use I've gotten

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OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Startup 101: Here’s How Open Sourcing Can Be Beneficial For You

    In this week's Startup 101, Upekkha founder Prasanna Krishnamoorthy tells how to make the right decision in open sourcing.

  • Is Bettering Threat Intelligence And Cyber Security the New Role For the Blockchain?

    Blockchains are typically epitomized by security and safety for storing data on its FL. They traditionally use depend on the trustless model to be completely trustworthy. On the principle of protection, it will make sense to begin applying the Blockchain initiative to a newly emerging movement in the cybersecurity space.

  • Crypto Pundit: Ethereum (ETH) Is “Doomed To Be Centralized”

    On January 14th, Preston Byrne, an attorney at Bryne & Storm that is enamored with blockchain technology, took to Twitter to mention his thoughts on Ethereum (ETH), likely in the context of the then-impending Constantinople hard fork, which was recently delayed due to security qualms. Byrne joked that the popular blockchain is more centralized than “the core of a neutron store falling into the event horizon of a black hole,” accentuating his true thoughts on Ethereum.

  • New Open Source Cryptocurrency Grin Has Deep-Pocketed Donors

    New cryptocurrency Grin launched its mainnet on January 15th. Grin is a volunteer-run project that says it’s only interested in getting the MimbleWimble technology — on which it is based — into public usage. But with major funding from multiple crypto investment firms and businesses, it’s unclear what safeguards Grin has in place to ensure the project remains independent.

  • Hell freezes over as Windows Core OS to include Open Source components [Ed: Microsoft propaganda site MSPoweruser is openwashing proprietary malware with NSA back doors, marketed to the public as "OS". It could be similarly argued that all versions of Windows "include Open Source components" because Microsoft had nicked TCP/IP code from BSD.]
  • How this woman went from a $20,000 a year Trader Joe's job to a well-paid programmer at a San Francisco startup

    But she was intrigued with the idea that she could have a fantastic career in tech by learning to code and wanted to try. She took a basic HTML course on Code Academy, a site that hosts free learn-to-code courses and it made sense.

    [...]

    You can even "fork" a project, she says: meaning make a copy of it that you can alter as you wish, sharing it with others.

GNU Parallel and FreeDink Releases

Filed under
Development
GNU
Gaming

Programming: POCL, Pelican and Python

Filed under
Development

Audiocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack (LHS), Linux Action News, Open Source Security Podcast and Let’s Encrypt

Filed under
Interviews
  • LHS Episode #266: #$%&! Net Neutrality

    Welcome to the first episode of Linux in the Ham Shack for 2019. In this episode, the hosts discuss topics including the 2018 RTTY Roundup using FT-8, Cubesats and wideband receivers in space, the ORI at Hamcation, Wekcan, Raspberry Pi-based VPN servers, the LHS Linux distributions, CW trainers and much more.

  • LHS Episode #267: The Weekender XXII

    Welcome to the 22nd edition of the LHS Weekender. In this episode, the hosts discuss upcoming amateur radio contests and special event stations, Open Source events in the next fortnight, Linux distributions of interest, news about science, technology and related endeavors as well is dive into food, drink and other hedonistic topics.

  • Linux Action News 89

    Another troubling week for MongoDB, ZFS On Linux lands a kernel workaround, and 600 days of postmarketOS.

    Plus our thoughts on the new Project Trident release, and Mozilla ending the Test Pilot program.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 130 - Chat with Snyk co-founder Danny Grander
  • The ACME Era | TechSNAP 395

    We welcome Jim to the show, and he and Wes dive deep into all things Let’s Encrypt.

Review: Sculpt OS 18.09

Filed under
OS
Reviews

The Sculpt OS website suggests that the operating system is ready for day to day use, at least in some environments: "Sculpt is used as day-to-day OS by the Genode developers." Though this makes me wonder in what capacity the operating system runs on the machines of those developers. When I tried out the Haiku beta last year, the operating system had some limitations, but I could see how it could be useful to some people in environments with compatible hardware. In theory, I could browse the web, perform some basic tasks and develop software on Haiku.

With Sculpt though, I was unable to get the operating system to do anything, from a user's point of view. The small OS could download packages and load some of them into memory, and it could display a graph of related components. Sculpt could connect to my network and mount additional storage. All of this is good and a fine demo of the Genode design. However, I (as a user) was unable to interact with any applications, find a command line, or browse the file system. All of this put a severe damper on my ability to use Sculpt to do anything useful.

Genode, and by extension Sculpt OS, has some interesting design goals when it comes to security and minimalism. However, I don't think Sculpt is practical for any end-user tasks at this time.

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This Week in Linux, Chrome OS, and Death of Windows 10 Mobile

Filed under
OS
Linux
Microsoft
  • Episode 51 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got some new announcements from Inkscape, Purism, Solus, Mozilla, and Steam. We’ll also check out some new Distro releases from Netrunner, Deeping, Android X86 and more. Then we’ll look at some new hardware offerings from Purism and Entroware. Later in the show will talk about some drama happening with a project’s licensing issues and then we’ll round out the episode with some Linux Gaming news including some sales from Humble Bundle. All that and much more!

  • Chrome OS 73 Dev Channel adds Google Drive, Play Files mount in Linux, USB device management and Crostini backup flag

    On Tuesday, Google released the first iteration of Chrome OS 73 for the Dev Channel and there are quite a few new items related to Project Crostini, for Linux app support. Some things in the lengthy changelog only set up new features coming soon while others add new functionality. Here’s a rundown on some of the Crostini additions to Chrome OS 73.

  • Tens to be disappointed as Windows 10 Mobile death date set: Doomed phone OS won't see 2020

    Microsoft has formally set the end date for support of its all-but-forgotten Windows 10 Mobile platform.

    The Redmond code factory said today that, come December 10, it's curtains for the ill-fated smartphone venture. The retirement will end a four-year run for a Microsoft phone effort that never really got off the ground and helped destroy Nokia in the process.

    "The end of support date applies to all Windows 10 Mobile products, including Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise," Microsoft declared.

Linux 5.0-rc3 Kernel Released With Plenty Of Fixes Plus Nouveau RTX 2080 Ti Support

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds has released the third weekly release candidate for the upcoming Linux 5.0 kernel release.

Being well past the winter holidays, Linux 5.0-rc3 saw a ton of commit activity this week with a lot of bug/regression fixing. Though one "feature" worth pointing out that was merged this week was Nouveau now supporting the NVIDIA TU102, a.k.a. the RTX 2080 Ti and TITAN RTX granted in its mode-setting-only limited form. That complements the other NVIDIA Turing GPU support added to the Nouveau DRM driver back during the Linux 5.0 merge window to round-out the current latest-generation GeForce RTX 2000 series graphics cards.

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Security: ThreadX, Kali Linux, Rocke and Data Loss

Filed under
Security
  • Vulnerabilities Found in Highly Popular Firmware for WiFi Chips

    WiFi chip firmware in a variety of devices used mainly for gaming, personal computing, and communication comes with multiple issues. At least some of them could be exploited to run arbitrary code remotely without requiring user interaction.

    The security flaws were discovered in ThreadX, a real-time operating system (RTOS) developed by Express Logic. The vendor claims on their website that ThreadX has over 6.2 billion deployments, being one of the most popular software powering Wi-Fi chips.

    The firmware is also powering the Avastar 88W8897 SoC (Wi-Fi + Bluetooth + NFC) from Marvell, present in Sony PlayStation 4 (and its Pro variant), Microsoft Surface (+Pro) tablet and laptop, Xbox One, Samsung Chromebook and smartphones (Galaxy J1), and Valve SteamLink.

  • Wolf Halton on what’s changed in tech and where we are headed

    The tech industry is changing at a massive rate especially after the storage options moved to the cloud. However, this has also given rise to questions on security, data management, change in the work structure within an organization, and much more. Wolf Halton, an expert in Kali Linux, tells us about the security element in the cloud. He also touches upon the skills and knowledge that should be inculcated in your software development cycle in order to adjust to the dynamic tech changes at present and in the future. Following this, he juxtaposes the current software development landscape with the ideal one.

  • Rocke coinminer disables cloud protection agents

    A group of hackers that specializes in infecting servers with cryptocurrency mining software has started disabling security software agents used in cloud environments to evade detection. Known as Rocke in the security industry, the group has been active since at least April 2018 and is known for exploiting critical vulnerabilities in web application frameworks and servers like Apache Struts, Oracle WebLogic and Adobe ColdFusion.

  • Malware used by “Rocke” group evolves to evade detection by cloud security products
  • Malware uninstalls cloud security products from Linux machines

    After removing the cloud security, the malware then proceeded to mine the monero cryptocurrency on its hosts.

  • I Nearly Lost All Of My Data!

    At this point I’m really worried. You see, I cancelled my off-site Amazon Glacier backups around 6 months ago. What are the chances of both a 4 disk RAID failing AND a USB drive at the same time? Not likely, I thought. Boy was I wrong

Solving the Year 2038 problem in the Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

Because of the way time is represented in Linux, a signed 32-bit number can't support times beyond January 19, 2038 after 3:14:07 UTC. This Year 2038 (Y2038 or Y2K38) problem is about the time data type representation. The solution is to use 64-bit timestamps.

I started working on the problem while working as an Outreachy intern for kernel developer Arnd Bergmann. Outreachy is a benevolent program that helps new programmers get into kernel development. The mentors for the kernel projects are usually experienced kernel developers like Arnd.

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Booting Linux faster

Filed under
Linux

Of all the computers I've ever owned or used, the one that booted the quickest was from the 1980s; by the time your hand moved from the power switch to the keyboard, the BASIC interpreter was ready for your commands. Modern computers take anywhere from 15 seconds for a laptop to minutes for a small home server to boot. Why is there such a difference in boot times?

A microcomputer from the 1980s that booted straight to a BASIC prompt had a very simple CPU that started fetching and executing instructions from a memory address immediately upon getting power. Since these systems had BASIC in ROM, there was no loading time—you got to the BASIC prompt really quickly. More complex systems of that same era, such as the IBM PC or Macintosh, took a significant time to boot (~30 seconds), although this was mostly due to having to read the operating system (OS) off a floppy disk. Only a handful of seconds were spent in firmware before being able to load an OS.

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Akira: The Linux Design Tool we’ve always wanted?

Filed under
News

Akira wants to create an awesome design tool for Linux that could compete with the likes of Figma, Sketch and Adobe XD. They need your help to achieve this goal.
Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Software: DICOM Viewers, gotop and Cockpit

  • Top 11 Free Linux DICOM Viewers for Doctors
    DICOM stands for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine and it is the international open image format for handling, storing, printing, and transmitting information in medical images. Medical images are used in the identification and examination of physical injuries and diseases via procedures like Xrays, CT scans, etc. This article lists the best free Linux applications used for processing images generated by DICOM devices.
  • gotop: Graphical System Monitor For The Command Line
    gotop is a terminal-based (TUI) system monitor for Linux and macOS. The software is inspired by gtop and vtop, but while these 2 utilities use Node.js, gotop is written in Go. The command line tool supports mouse clicking and scrolling, comes with vi-keys, and it displays the CPU, memory and network usage history using colored graphs, while also displaying their current values. gotop also shows the disk usage, temperatures and a top process list, which includes CPU and memory usage.
  • Cockpit 186
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 186.

Netrunner's Unique Blackbird Soars to New Heights

Blackbird, Netrunner's version 19.01 release, hit the download servers on Jan. 14, and this distro deserves to be considered bleeding-edge. Netrunner is a step ahead of other KDE distros, thanks to its solid integration of classic KDE desktop performance with Web-based applications and cloud services. That said, if you aren't fondness of the K Desktop, Netrunner may leave you wanting more desktop simplicity. For that you must look elsewhere. KDE is the only desktop available from the Germany-based Blue Systems development team. Blackbird is based on Debian's "Testing" branch. Its developer brings some aggressive updates to the distro that propel it ahead of other distros' regular development cycles. The main updates include KDE Plasma 5.14.3, KDE Frameworks 5.51, KDE Applications 18.08 and Qt 5.11.3 for its essential security updates. Linux Kernel 4.19, Firefox Quantum 64.0 and Thunderbird 60.3 push the envelope as well. One of the more noticeable new features in Blackbird is its new Netrunner Black theme. This theme is based on a dark-toned contrasting visual. It uses the Kvantum theme engine, plus the Alpha-Black Plasma theme, to produce a more 3D-looking design. Read more

Mozilla Masking 'Content', ffsend and New Accountant or Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Brussels Mozilla Mornings – Disinformation and online advertising: an unhealthy relationship?
    On the morning of 19 February, Mozilla will host the second of our Mozilla Mornings series – regular breakfast meetings where we bring together policy experts, policymakers and practitioners for insight and discussion on the latest EU digital policy developments. This session will be devoted to disinformation and online advertising. Our expert panel will seek to unpack the relation between the two and explore policy solutions to ensure a healthy online advertising ecosystem.
  • ffsend – Easily And Securely Share Files From Linux Command Line Using Firefox Send Client
    Linux users were preferred to go with scp or rsync for files or folders copy. However, so many new options are coming to Linux because it’s a opensource. Anyone can develop a secure software for Linux. We had written multiple articles in our site in the past about this topic. Even, today we are going to discuss the same kind of topic called ffsend.
  • Welcome Roxi Wen, our incoming Chief Financial Officer
    I am excited to announce that Roxi Wen is joining Mozilla Corporation as our Chief Financial Officer (CFO) next month. As a wholly-owned subsidiary of the non-profit Mozilla Foundation, the Mozilla Corporation, with over 1,000 full-time employees worldwide, creates products, advances public policy and explores new technology that give people more control over their lives online, and shapes the future of the global internet platform for the public good. As our CFO Roxi will become a key member of our senior executive team with responsibility for leading financial operations and strategy as we scale our mission impact with new and existing products, technology and business models to better serve our users and advance our agenda for a healthier internet.

Security: apt/apt-get, Blockchains and More