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Saturday, 23 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story CA confirms plans for open source patent pledge srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:06pm
Story Intel PR Department Hard at Work srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:08pm
Story ChoicePoint was victim of ID theft in '02 srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:25pm
Story amoroK LiveCD srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 6:01pm
Story Gentoo Linux 2005.0 Security Rebuild srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 11:25pm
Story Hacker taps into business school files" srlinuxx 04/03/2005 - 2:11pm
Story Judge hits amazon.com with fine srlinuxx 04/03/2005 - 2:46pm
Story One in four 'touched' by ID fraud srlinuxx 2 04/03/2005 - 5:03pm
Story Big Brother is Watching your Toyota Sienna srlinuxx 1 05/03/2005 - 4:17am
Story Limp Bizkit lead claims hackers stole his sex video srlinuxx 2 05/03/2005 - 4:43am

5 of the Best Linux Distros for Developers and Programmers

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

One of the reasons Linux is great is because of how flexible it is. For example, it can run on everything from servers to your old laptop to a Raspberry Pi. For this reason, it’s also a fantastic platform for developers.

Whether you’re a seasoned developer or just using Linux to learn to program, you still have to choose a distribution. You could just choose Ubuntu and run with it, but there are plenty of “other options available to you.”

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How To Automatically Change GNOME Background In Intervals Using BASH

Filed under
Linux

Have you ever wanted to have that automatic background switching feature on your GNOME Linux distro? I missed that feature after I switched from Cinnamon to GNOME Sad Searched for apps in the software center and alas there is none that I could find. However, today I’m happy to let you know that there is a workaround to this missing feature through the use of BASH scripting language.

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Arm-based IoT gateway runs on Moxa Industrial Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Moxa announced a -40 to 85°C tolerant “UC-8200” IoT gateway that runs Moxa Industrial Linux on a dual-core, -A7 SoC and offers dual GbE, RS-232/422/485, and mini-PCIe links, plus a CAN port, WiFi/BT, and optional 4G LTE.

Moxa, which announced its Cortex-A8-based UC 2100 series of Industrial IoT gateways last April, partially unveiled a new IIoT gateway called the UC-8200. The system features an unnamed dual-core, Cortex-A7 SoC that “has been optimised for use in energy monitoring systems but is widely applicable to a variety of industrial solutions,” according to the PR-like Control Engineering story that announced the product along with a shorter Industrial Ethernet Book post.

Eventually, a product page should appear with missing details such as RAM and storage. Yet, even the product page for the similar UC-8100 series fails to describe the Cortex-A8 SoC. Other specs are complete, however, such as the earlier model’s 256MB to 512MB DDR3 and 8GB eMMC. (Update: LinuxGizmos reader Arnd Bergmann spotted the earlier UC-8100’s SoC family in the firmware image’s device tree. It’s a TI Sitara AM33x, perhaps one of the AM335x family, which runs on BeagelBone boards.)

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Also: Arm Neoverse N1 & E1 Platforms Announced For Cloud To Edge Computing

OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 Beta

Filed under
SUSE
  • Leap 15.1 entering Beta phase

    Leap 15.1 entered the Beta phase with build 416.2 that reached the
    mirrors yesterday. Everyone is encouraged to download¹ the current
    builds and help testing. There are also live images to e.g. check
    hardware compatibility without installation.

    The Beta phase will last until mid April. Planned release is before
    the conference in May.

    Issues found need to be filed in Bugzilla². There is also a test
    plan³ to help coordinate the efforts. Feel free to fill in what you
    tested so we get an overview of what was covered already.

    Note that Leap 15.1 did not automatically sync with package versions
    in Factory. That is intentional as 15.1 is meant to be a minor
    update. Please submit any necessary bigger version updates the next
    two weeks to still have time for thorough testing. Please contact
    the release team⁴ in case of questions.

    Users of 42.3 please be aware that 42.3 reaches end of life a few
    weeks after the release of 15.1. In general an update to 15.1
    directly is possible. It's recommended to participate in beta
    testing to make sure your specific workload or use case still works
    after an upgrade.

    cu
    Ludwig

  • OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 Reaches Beta Milestone

Games: Engadget's FUD, Valve and Google Plans, More (and Improved) Gaming on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Linux gaming is on a life-support system called Steam [Ed: Misleading. Frames Steam as the one and only platform for games; that's like saying FOSS is just GitHub (a common error).]

    In September 2013, Valve founder Gabe Newell gave a rare, 20-minute presentation at LinuxCon.

  • The number of Linux gamers on Steam continues to grow, according to Valve

    Recently, Engadget wrote an article about Linux gaming and apart from a bit of a silly title and information regular GOL readers will be aware of, they did have some interesting info from Valve.

    I don't put too much thought into the title they decided to give it, "Linux gaming is on a life-support system called Steam", since when you think about it that's actually quite close to the truth. Valve are the biggest pushers of Linux gaming and one of the only major forces doing so.

    While I've long said that the amount of Linux gamers using Steam will be increasing all the time, the actual market share of Linux on Steam hasn't really gone anywhere. At times, it has certainly looked like the amount of Linux gamers has decreased if you take the percentage at face value.

  • Valve is getting back to focusing on gaming, with non-gaming videos being retired

    Why is it not surprising? Well, it makes sense for multiple reasons. Did you ever buy and watch any movies (or other non-gaming videos) on Steam? I didn't, it's far easier to use a different service like Netflix, Google Play or practically any other where you could watch your content across pretty much any device and browser.

    On top of that, Valve's bread and butter is gaming and since they now have more competition actually focusing on that is obvious at this point.

  • Google Could Reveal Its Mystery ‘Online Gaming’ Project In March

    Google has scheduled an event next month at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco.

    This is reportedly where it could unveil its gaming project that has been under development for quite some time.

  • The huge Rocket League update is now out with cross-platform friends support and Season 10 has started

    Rocket League, the game that sucks away most of my gaming time has a fantastic update now out that allows you to party up with friends across different platforms.

    There's a whole new part of the interface to deal with this, the Friends List which is split into different sections covering friends from your current platform, RocketID to show friends on other platforms, a recent players list to reach out to people you've had a good game with and an alerts section to see notifications.

  • Gallium Nine With NIR Is Now Running Most D3D9 Games "Flawlessly"

    Towards the beginning of the month we reported on the Gallium Nine state tracker working on NIR support as an alternative to its original focus on the common TGSI intermediate representation to Gallium3D. That NIR-ified version of Gallium Nine is now working and beginning to run most Direct3D 9 games fine.

    Plumbing NIR support into Gallium Nine is being done for newer Gallium3D drivers that focus on NIR support rather than the aging TGSI. In particular, NIR support is needed for the new Intel Iris Gallium3D driver (though still yet to be mainlined), possibilities like running Gallium Nine atop Zink to in turn map to Vulkan drivers, and working for other NIR drivers like VC4/V3D or Freedreno.

It Soon May Be Easier Building Debian Packages On Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Debian
  • It Soon May Be Easier Building Debian Packages On Fedora

    While Fedora is deeply rooted around RPMs, the necessary components for building Debian binary packages may soon end up in the Fedora repository -- they're currently undergoing the package review process. Developer Dridi Boukelmoune was fed up with the current situation and took to improving the Debian packaging options for Fedora to make it easier spinning Debian packages there without resorting to VMs or other avenues. This can be useful in cases of commercial/internal software and other practices where you may be needing to build both RPMs and Debs and desire to do so from a single stack.

  • Ditch RPM in favor of DPKG

    I know how important RPM is to the Fedora Project, but it breaks everything downstream and we'd be better off using DPKG as we should have from day one. I'm calling this initiative fedpkg: Fedora Embraces DPKG. A bit of background here: I build both RPMs and DEBs for $DAYJOB and until recently my workflow was quite painful because I needed extra steps between git checkout and git push that involves a VM, because what we ship as apt is in reality apt-rpm. It finally got enough on my nerves to locally build the things I needed and after a month I have already amortized my efforts with the time I save not having to deal with needless extra hoops. In order to successfully build debs on Fedora I needed 4 packages that I'm now submitting for review: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=gnu-config https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=strip-nondeterminism https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=sbuild https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=apt I need more than reviews here. Three of those packages are heavy on Perl code, and I'm not a Perl Monk. I tried to CC perl-sig as per the guidelines [1] (also tried with the mailing list address) but bugzilla replied kindly: CC: perl-sig did not match anything Apt is a mix of C, Perl and C++ code, so I would be reassured if I could have a C++ co-maintainer too. I'm only a C developer so if something goes wrong outside of the C realm that would be helpful. Two of those packages should be runtime dependencies of debhelper. The current apt package should be renamed to apt-rpm, I will look up the procedure for that to happen. I understand that when someone sees they should run "apt-get install foo" somewhere on the web it's helpful for non-savvy users that this JustWorks(tm) [2], but apt-rpm is dead upstream and it shouldn't be advertised as apt. I hope I CC'd everyone that should get this heads up, and hope to find help for the reviews and co-maintainership. The packaging does nothing fancy, there are quirks here and there but overall it was rather easy to put together. And of course I would be happy to help with reviews too in exchange. And thanks again to the mock developers, its design is so much better than either sbuild or pdebuild that I barely have pain points left when it comes to RPM packaging. Thanks, Dridi

The battle between real open source vs. faux open source heats up

Filed under
OSS

On February 19, Redis Labs, the home of Redis, the popular open-source in-memory data structure store, announced it has raised $60 million in new financing. Redis Labs CEO Ofer Bengal told Ars Technica that one reason for this was its new "open-source" Common Clause license. "The community now understands that the original concept of open source has to be fixed because it isn't suitable anymore to the modern era where cloud companies use their monopoly power to adopt any successful open-source project without contributing anything to it," Bengal said.

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Community release: PCLinuxOS LXQt 2019.02 ISO

Filed under
PCLOS

First of all, it is the fourth release with LXQt 0.14. As experimental are some locales as default installed. To set the languages use pcc>system>Manage localization for your system.
Log out/in to display your favorite language. It’s use the Kernel 4.20.10, and UEFI Support. Applications include falcon, qmplay2, phototonic, pavucontrol-qt, grub-customizer, qpdfview, featherpad, brasero, file-roller and much more inside…

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Essential System Tools: QDirStat – Excellent Qt-based directory statistics

Filed under
KDE

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at QDirStat, a graphical application to show what’s devouring your disk space and help you tidy up the disorder. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article.

QDirStat is a continuation of the KDirStat utility. QDirStat is based on the latest Qt 5, and doesn’t need any KDE libraries or infrastructure.

If you come from a Windows background you’ve probably tried WinDirStat, a Windows port of KDirStat, the predecessor of QDirStat.

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KDE is adding Matrix to its instant messaging infrastructure

Filed under
KDE

KDE has been looking for a better way of chatting and live-sharing information for several years now. IRC has been a good solution for a long time, but it has centralized servers KDE cannot control. It is also insecure and lacks features users have come to expect from more modern IM services. Other alternatives, such as Telegram, Slack and Discord, although feature-rich, are centralized and built around closed-source technologies and offer even less control than IRC. This flies in the face of KDE's principles that require we use and support technologies based on Free software.

However, our search for a better solution has finally come to an end: as of today we are officially using Matrix for collaboration within KDE! Matrix is an open protocol and network for decentralised communication, backed by an open standard and open source reference implementations for servers, clients, client SDKs, bridges, bots and more. It provides all the features you’d expect from a modern chat system: infinite scrollback, file transfer, typing notifications, read receipts, presence, search, push notifications, stickers, VoIP calling and conferencing, etc. It even provides end-to-end encryption (based on Signal’s double ratchet algorithm) for when you want some privacy.

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Also: KDE To Support Matrix Decentralized Instant Messaging

Canonical Is Planning Some Awesome New Content For The Snap Store

Filed under
Ubuntu

There I was, thoughtfully drafting an article titled "3 Things Canonical Can Do To Improve The Snap Ecosystem," when I jumped on the phone with Evan Dandrea, an Engineering Manager who just so happens to be responsible for the Snapcraft ecosystem at Canonical. As it turns out, that headline will need a slight edit. One less number. That's because I've just learned Canonical has some ambitious plans for the future of the Snap Store.

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Extensive Benchmarks Looking At AMD Znver1 GCC 9 Performance, EPYC Compiler Tuning

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the GCC 9 compiler due to be officially released as stable in the next month or two, we've been running benchmarks of this near-final state to the GNU Compiler Collection on a diverse range of processors. In recent weeks that has included extensive compiler benchmarks on a dozen x86_64 systems, POWER9 compiler testing on the Talos II, and also the AArch64 compiler performance on recent releases of GCC and LLVM Clang. In this latest installment of our GCC 9 compiler benchmarking is an extensive look at the AMD EPYC Znver1 performance on various releases of the GCC compiler as well as looking at various optimization levels under this new compiler on the Znver1 processor.

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Plasma 5.15.1 arrives in Cosmic backports PPA

Filed under
KDE
Security

We are pleased to announce that the 1st bugfix release of Plasma 5.15, 5.15.1, is now available in our backports PPA for Cosmic 18.10.

The release announcement detailing the new features and improvements in Plasma 5.15 can be found here, while the full 5.15.1 bugfix changelog can be found here.

Released along with this new version of Plasma is an update to KDE Frameworks 5.54. (5.55 is currently in testing in Disco 19.04 and may follow in the next few weeks.)

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Stable kernels 4.20.11, 4.19.24, 4.14.102, 4.9.159 , 4.4.175 and 3.18.135

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.20.11

    I'm announcing the release of the 4.20.11 kernel.

    All users of the 4.20 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 4.20.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.20.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

  • Linux 4.19.24
  • Linux 4.14.102
  • Linux 4.9.159
  • Linux 4.4.175
  • Linux 3.18.135

Improve Your Productivity With Ambient Noise in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

ANoise aka Ambient Noise is an utility which plays various noises such as Rains, Fountains, thunderstorms, fire, sea, night etc. This constant and repeating sound helps general users, students to be more productive and concentrate on their work.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Programming: OpenJDK, Python, PyGame and Pandas

Filed under
Development
  • OpenJDK

    OpenJDK is a free, open-source version of the Java Development Kit for the Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE). OpenJDK, which stands for Open Java Development Kit, originated from an effort initiated by Sun Microsystems in 2006 and is now sponsored and led by Oracle. The project is licensed under the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL) version 2 with a linking exception. Without the linking exception, components that linked to the Java class library would be subject to the terms of the GPL license.

    Since the release of Java SE version 7, OpenJDK has been the official reference implementation. A few notable components that fall under the OpenJDK project include the Java class library, the Java compiler, the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) and the Java virtual machine (JVM). Unlike other JDK release projects, which focused on releasing one feature at a time before terminating, OpenJDK is a long-term, ongoing project. OpenJDK follows a strict, time-based model that is split into development branches and will release new features every six months.

  • Pandas Tutorial in Python

    According to the Pandas homepage: pandas is an open source, BSD-licensed library providing high-performance, easy-to-use data structures and data analysis tools for the Python programming language.

    One of the coolest things about Pandas is that it makes reading data from common data formats like CSV, SQL etc. very easy which makes it equally usable in production grade applications or just some demo applications.

  • New Course: Learn Data Cleaning with Python and Pandas
  • Adjust the boy sprite animation

    Hello, and welcome back, we are almost done coding the player animation mechanism after we have finished the player boundary detection mechanism in the last article but before we can go to the next stage we need to tidy up the player animation mechanism first by introducing the standstill image of the boy when the boy is not moving and that image will either face left or right or up or down based on the direction of the boy at the time he stops moving. In order to achieve this we only need to edit two files.

    The first file we need to edit is the main file where we will include the keyup event so we can set the x different or y different to zero when the boy who is moving in either x or y-direction suddenly stop moving.

Decentralized Slack Alternative Riot Releases its First Stable Version

Filed under
OSS

As you can see, here you can change the homeserver. The idea of riot as was shared before is to have de-centralized chat services, without foregoing the simplicity that centralized services offer. For those who want to run their own homeservers, you need the new matrix-syanpse 0.99.1.1 reference homeserver.

You can find an unofficial list of matrix homeservers listed here although it’s far from complete.

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More in Tux Machines

qoob – excellent foobar-like music player for Linux

Are you debilitated by the countless music players that use web technologies with a massive RAM footprint? Maybe you want a lean yet slick audio player with a good range of features? You might be interested in qoob. It’s a music player written in the versatile and hugely popular Python programming language. The software uses Qt 5, a cross-platform application framework and widget toolkit for creating classic and embedded graphical user interfaces. qoob is similar to foobar2000, a freeware audio player respected for its highly modular design, breadth of features, and extensive user flexibility in configuration. Unlike foobar, qoob is available for Linux and it’s released under an open source license. Read more

Programming: GStreamer, Rust, Python and More

  • GStreamer 1.15.1 unstable development release
    The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first development release in the unstable 1.15 release series. The unstable 1.15 release series adds new features on top of the current stable 1.16 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework. The unstable 1.15 release series is for testing and development purposes in the lead-up to the stable 1.16 series which is scheduled for release in a few weeks time. Any newly-added API can still change until that point, although it is rare for that to happen. Full release notes will be provided in the near future, highlighting all the new features, bugfixes, performance optimizations and other important changes.
  • GStreamer: GStreamer Rust bindings 0.13.0 release
    A new version of the GStreamer Rust bindings, 0.13.0, was released. This new release is the first to include direct support for implementing GStreamer elements and other types in Rust. Previously this was provided via a different crate. In addition to this, the new release features many API improvements, cleanups, newly added bindings and bugfixes.
  • Niko Matsakis: Rust lang team working groups
    Now that the Rust 2018 edition has shipped, the language design team has been thinking a lot about what to do in 2019 and over the next few years. I think we’ve got a lot of exciting stuff on the horizon, and I wanted to write about it.
  • RVowpalWabbit 0.0.13: Keeping CRAN happy
    Another small RVowpalWabbit package update brings us version 0.0.13. And just like Rblpapi yesterday, we have a new RVowpalWabbit update to cope with staged installs which will be a new feature of R 3.6.0. No other changes were made No new code or features were added.
  • Test automation framework thoughts and examples with Python, pytest and Jenkins
    In this article I'll share some personal thoughts about Test Automation Frameworks; you can take inspiration from them if you are going to evaluate different test automation platforms or assess your current test automation solution (or solutions). Despite it is a generic article about test automation, you'll find many examples explaining how to address some common needs using the Python based test framework named pytest and the Jenkins automation server: use the information contained here just as a comparison and feel free to comment sharing alternative methods or ideas coming from different worlds. It contains references to some well (or less) known pytest plugins or testing libraries too.
  • Basics of Object-Oriented Programming
    In programming, an object is simply a 'thing'. I know, I know...how can you define something as a 'thing'. Well, let's think about it - What do 'things' have? Attributes, right? Let's take a Song for example. A song has attributes! It has a Title, an Artist, a Genre, etc. How about a Dog - A dog has four legs, a color, a name, an owner, and a breed. Though there are millions Dogs with countless names, owners, etc, the one thing that ties them all together are the very fact that every single one can be described as a Dog. Although this may seem like a not-very informative explanation, these types of examples are what ultimately made me understand Object-oriented programing. The set of activities that an object can perform is an Object's behavior. A dog can bark, wag it's tail, sit, and even shake if it's owner trains them. In the same way, a programmer can create an object and teach it tricks in order to achieve certain goals. In Ruby(my first programming language), EVERYTHING is an object. This means that every piece of code you encounter can perform certain tricks at your command, some are built into Ruby while others can be created at your disposal. Let's look at a common element in programming, a simple string. As you can see, after the string is defined, I'm able to call different 'methods' or functions on the string I created. Ruby has several built in methods on common objects(ie strings, integers, arrays, and hashes.
  • Hello pytest-play!
    pytest-play is a rec&play (rec not yet available) pytest plugin that let you execute a set of actions and assertions using commands serialized in JSON format. It tries to make test automation more affordable for non programmers or non Python programmers for browser, functional, API, integration or system testing thanks to its pluggable architecture and third party plugins that let you interact with the most common databases and systems.
  • Nikola v8.0.2 is out!
    Nikola is a static site and blog generator, written in Python. It can use Mako and Jinja2 templates, and input in many popular markup formats, such as reStructuredText and Markdown — and can even turn Jupyter Notebooks into blog posts! It also supports image galleries, and is multilingual. Nikola is flexible, and page builds are extremely fast, courtesy of doit (which is rebuilding only what has been changed).
  • Mu!
    In the past several days, I innaugurated a private Fediverse instance, "Mu", running Pleroma for now. Although Mastodon is the dominant implementation, Pleroma is far easier to install, and uses less memory on small, private instances. By doing this, I'm bucking the trend of people hating to run their own infrastructure. Well, I do run my own e-mail service, so, what the heck, might as well join the Fediverse. So far, it was pretty fun, but Pleroma has problem spots. For example, Pleroma has a concept of "local accounts" and "remote accounts": local ones are normal, into which users log in at the instance, and remote ones mirror accounts on other instances. This way, if users Alice@Mu and Bob@Mu follow user zaitcev@SLC, Mu creates a "remote" account UnIqUeStRiNg@Mu, which tracks zaitcev@SLC, so Alice and Bob subscribe to it locally. This permits to send zaitcev's updates over the network only once. Makes sense, right? Well... I have a "stuck" remote account now at Mu, let's call it Xprime@Mu and posit that it follows X@SPC. Updates posted by X@SPC are reflected in Xprime@Mu, but if Alice@Mu tries to follow X@SPC, she does not see updates that Xprime@Mu receives (the updates are not reflected in Alice's friends/main timeline) [1]. I asked at #pleroma about it, but all they could suggest was to try and resubscribe. I think I need to unsubscribe and purge Xprime@Mu somehow. Then, when Alice resubscribes, Pleroma will re-create a remote, say Xbis@Mu, and things hopefully ought to work. Well, maybe. I need to examine the source to be sure.
  • Django ORM optimization story on selecting the least possible
    This an optimization story that should not surprise anyone using the Django ORM. But I thought I'd share because I have numbers now! The origin of this came from a real requirement. For a given parent model, I'd like to extract the value of the name column of all its child models, and the turn all these name strings into 1 MD5 checksum string.
  • Reasons Mitogen sucks
    I have a particular dislike for nonspecific negativity, where nothing can be done to address its source because the reasons underlying it are never explicitly described. In the context of Mitogen, there has been a consistent stream of this sort originating from an important camp in public spaces, and despite efforts to bring specifics out into the open, still it continues to persist. For that reason I'd like to try a new strategy: justify the negativity and give it a face by providing all the fuel it needs to burn. Therefore in this post, in the interests of encouraging honesty, I will critique my own work.
  • The North Star of PyCascades, core Python developer Mariatta Wijaya, receives the 2018 Q3 Community Service Award
    At Montreal PyCon 2015, Guido Van Rossum delivered the closing keynote during which Guido issued a public ask, “I want at least two female Python core developers in the next year ... and I will try to train them myself if that's what it takes. So come talk to me." Consequently, Mariatta did just that, she reached out to Guido after PyCon 2016 to learn more about starting in Python core development. Mariatta recalls, “I hadn’t contributed to open source [yet] and I wanted to know how to start”. Guido recommended some ways for Mariatta to start including reviewing the dev guide, looking at open issues and joining and introducing herself on the Python dev mailing list .
  • Episode #118: Better Python executable management with pipx

NVIDIA: GTX 1660 and Linux

  • NVIDIA have released the 418.43 driver, includes support for the just released GeForce GTX 1660
    Two bits of NVIDIA news for you today, not only have they released a new stable driver, they've also put out their latest GPU with the GTX 1660. First up, the new stable driver 418.43 is out which you can find here. It follows on from the 418.30 beta driver, released last month. The big new feature of the driver is initial support for G-SYNC Compatible monitors! So those of you with a FreeSync monitor should be able to use it (if you weren't already using the beta driver). This new driver also adds in support for the just released GeForce GTX 1660 Ti, the GeForce RTX 2070 with Max-Q Design and the GeForce RTX 2080 with Max-Q Design. There's also NVIDIA optical flow support, NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.0, support for stereo presentation in Vulkan and more.
  • NVIDIA 418.43 Stable Linux Driver Released, Includes GTX 1660 Ti Support
    As expected given today's GeForce GTX 1660 Ti launch, NVIDIA has released a new Linux graphics driver supporting the 1660 Ti as well as the RTX 2070 with Max-Q Design and RTX 2080 with Max-Q Design, among other changes. This is actually the first stable release in the NVIDIA 418 series for Linux users and succeeds last month's NVIDIA 418.30 Linux driver beta. Most of the changes in today's NVIDIA 418.43 driver release were previously found in the 418.30 version, just now made official with this stable driver debut plus adding in the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics card support.
  • NVIDIA 390.116 Legacy & 410.104 Long-Lived Linux Drivers Released
    In addition to NVIDIA christening the 418 driver series as stable today with the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti release, they also issued updates for their 390 legacy driver series as well as the 410 long-lived driver release series. The NVIDIA 390.116 driver is out for those still using NVIDIA Fermi graphics cards on Linux. This update is the first in a while and has a number of fixes to the Linux driver, on the FreeBSD side there is now 12.0 support, support for the Linux 5.0 kernel, X.Org Server 1.20 fixes, and other random fixes collected in the past few months. For those using this NVIDIA legacy driver can find out more information via this DevTalk thread.
  • GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Launch Today - Supported By The NVIDIA Linux Driver, No Nouveau Yet
    After weeks of leaks, the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti is expected to be formally announced in just a few hours. This is a ~$300 Turing graphics card but without any ray-tracing support as so far has been common to all Turing graphics cards. The GTX 1600 series family is expected to expand as well in the weeks ahead.

Betty – A Friendly Interface For Your Linux Command Line

All Linux experts might already know this statement “Command line mode is more powerful than GUI” but newbies are scared about CLI. Don’t think that working on Linux CLI is difficult as everything is opensource nowadays and you can get it in online whatever you want. If you have any doubt just google it and you will get many suggestion, select the suitable one and move forward. If you are looking for some virtual assistant tool instead of google. Yes, there is a tool is available for this and the tool name is Betty which helps you to get the information right from your terminal. Do you want to try? if so, go through the entire article for details. Read more