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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Adventures in IPv6 srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:35am
Story Re: Control is Highly Overrated and Overpriced srlinuxx 4 09/06/2011 - 2:27am
Story The relationship between CentOS and Redhat srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 10:35pm
Story EBooks are "attacking our freedom" srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 10:33pm
Story Discovering a New World srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 10:30pm
Story Has Linux Missed the IPv6 Day Train? srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 8:43pm
Story FreeNAS 8 review srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 7:42pm
Story Valve and Linux Troubles srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 7:40pm
Story GNOME, KDE and Unity: Virtual Desktops srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 7:37pm
Story The Fruits of DEX Begin to Emerge srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 7:35pm

Install Slackware 11.0 in a VMware ESX Server 2.5.x VM

Filed under
HowTos

Slackware is not officially supported on VMware, but it can be installed without too many problems. This guide will help you install Slackware in a safe VMware virtual environment, with its own unique quirks to take care off.

Unsinkable Vista?

Filed under
Microsoft

Vista doesn't need anti-viral software? That's what Jim Allchin, co-president of Microsoft's platforms and services division, said in a recent phone conference on Vista's release to manufacturing (RTM). Let's get real. The Titanic sank. Vista will be cracked.

AT&T uses open source to assure dominance

Filed under
OSS

How can anyone compete with AT&T if it has open source religion? Someone needs to figure that out, because they do. AT&T is an investor in OpenClovis.

Ubuntu vs FC5

Filed under
Linux

I think the fight is never going to end . The only topic the whole glugt seems to discuss for the past one month ( or even more than that ) is UBUNTU or FEDORA. Had a small chat with gc regarding the bootup time comparision of ubuntu and FC and some of the details i got from there is...

Red Hat Speaks: Microsoft And Oracle Are Following The Linux Leader

Filed under
Interviews

Red Hat executive VP of engineering Paul Cormier talks about Red Hat's response to the newly invigorated competition from Microsoft and Oracle in the Linux market. InformationWeek's Larry Greenemeier spoke with Red Hat executive Paul Cormier about Red Hat's response to the newly invigorated competition in the Linux market.

Only Novell to get Linux sales perk from Microsoft

Filed under
SUSE

A week after Microsoft Corp. struck a broad Linux pact with Novell Inc., Microsoft executives made claims that they are open to considering making similar deals with Linux vendor Red Hat and other open-source companies.

Ethics, employment and free software

Filed under
OSS

Like most people around the world, I have to work to earn a living. And again, like the vast majority of these people, often my work requires me to carry out tasks that I might otherwise find ethically problematic. As a supporter of free culture, I have often found it difficult to reconcile my own convictions on issues such as copyright and DRM with those of my employers.

How to copy linux to a different partition

Filed under
HowTos

We can be happily working away on our computer and we spent hours putting the final touches on the caricature of our political leader. When we try to save it we get an unable to save error. Puzzled we do a bit of investigating and find that our partition is full. After deleting a few temporary files and managing to save our masterpiece we decide that, as we haven't used windows for a long time and it is a much bigger partition, we will delete windows and move our now precious linux to the bigger partition. Then we scratch our head, sit back and think "How do I do that?". Here's how.

Outlook takes 136 years to sync email

Filed under
Humor

Microsoft has again found itself at the heart of a time-related SNAFU. While syncing outlook to our corporate email system I was rather shocked to see the "status" window informing be there was 1193046 hours remaining for the sync to complete. Thats, erm, 136 years (give or take a few days). Is this a record?

Denial of service attacks outlawed

Filed under
Security

A UK law has been passed that makes it an offence to launch denial of service attacks, which experts had previously called "a legal grey area."

Report from the Ubuntu Developer Summit

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu developers and other interested parties from all over the world have swarmed to Google's offices in Mountain View this week for the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) to plan out the next release of Ubuntu.

The Open-Source Impact

Filed under
OSS

Is open-source software making an impact in small and medium-sized enterprises? That depends on whom you ask. Open-source developers and service providers will sing the praises of software that is not only free but also frees you from many long-established commercial restraints.

Customizing Your Ubuntu Linux Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux expert Marcel Gagne shows how to customize your Ubuntu Linux system to make it truly yours — change your background, your colors, your fonts, and anything else you need to create a desktop as individual as you are.

Developing with Apache Derby – Hitting the Trifecta

This article reviews how to modify an SQL query to group related rows together to provide summary statistics database information and introduces the concept of a view, which can be used to simplify database application development by creating a virtual table that represents the results of an SQL query. Also learn about database indexes, which you can use to locate specific table rows. After you've mastered these advanced database concepts, you'll be well positioned to begin developing Java database applications with Apache Derby.

SFLC’s Bradley M. Kuhn on Novell-Microsoft

Filed under
SUSE

A careful examination of Microsoft’s Patent Pledge for Non-Compensated Developers reveals that it has little value. The patent covenant only applies to software that you develop at home and keep for yourself; the promises don’t extend to others when you distribute. You cannot pass the rights to your downstream recipients, even to the maintainers of larger projects on which your contribution is built.

Running ASP.NET Applications in Debian and Ubuntu using XSP and Mono

Filed under
HowTos

Mono is an open-source project providing the necessary software to develop and run .NET client and server applications on Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X, Windows, and Unix. Monodevelop is probably the best IDE for developing .NET applications on Linux. In order to install and use it for development, you will also need the Mono .NET runtime environment installed.

Ubuntu Edgy 6.10 Clean Install Impressions

Filed under
Ubuntu

After my success upgrading from Ubuntu 6.06 to Edgy 6.10 I decided to reformat my hard drive and try doing a clean install. The whole install process went very smoothly and was an improvement over the Ubuntu 6.06 install.

Blogging made easy with Drivel

Filed under
Software

Most bloggers use a browser to log in and post new entries. The Drivel Journal Editor is designed for those who consider using a browser too tedious when making new blog entries. Designed for GNOME, Drivel can work with Blogger, LiveJournal, MovableType, WordPress, and other popular journaling tools. Despite an elegant yet simple interface, Drivel packs in some very useful features, such as an integrated spellcheker, HTML syntax highlighting, and the ability to edit and update past entries.

Jono Bacon: UDS nearly done

Filed under
Ubuntu

Well, the UDS finishes up tomorrow, and lots has been going on. The spec about unifying resources with Launchpad was very productive, and there was some discussion of it being rolled out for planets and user maps.

Weakly Debian Nudes #4

Filed under
Humor

Nothing happened this week. Sorry.

But that never stopped me before, so...

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

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Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more