Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Encrypted home partition in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever wondered what would have happened if all the important data has been stolen from your mobile PC? For example the information about the confidential project of your company you have been working on for the last 2 years… A horrifying vision, isn’t it? Well, if you don’t want to let it come true, please consider encrypting your home drive. Here is how to do this.

Free Desktop Publisher Scribus Is Worth a Look

Filed under
Software

Adobe Systems created a media tsunami earlier this month when it released its Creative Suite 3, a two-year project designed to roll all the company's formidable software packages for creative types into an integrated monolith. Needless to say, since the package costs more than US$1,000, it isn't something for tinkerers.

iKog: The tiny to-do manager that could

Filed under
Software

iKog is a text-based to-do manager that can help you to keep tabs on your tasks from the command line. Although it lacks all the bells and whistles of a full-blown GUI task manager, it's one of those tools that make a virtue of doing a limited range of tasks well.

Hands on Ubuntu…

Filed under
Ubuntu

With all the fuss going on about Ubuntu I thought why not give it a try!

Firefox claws more users from Microsoft

Filed under
Moz/FF

When the Firefox web browser was launched in 2004, the then head of Microsoft Australia Steve Vamos was quoted as saying he did not believe it would pose a real threat to Internet Explorer's market share.

He said the additional features Firefox offered, such as the ability to view multiple web pages within "tabs" in a single browser window, were not necessarily what consumers wanted.

One Laptop Per Child clarity

Filed under
OLPC
Interviews

The past week has been filled with speculation and rumour after it was announced that the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) would now cost US$175 instead of the originally quoted US$100. And to add fuel to the fire it was also reported widely in the press that the OLPC was now capable of running Windows.

Forrester: Open source is everywhere, and increasingly used for mission-critical applications

Filed under
OSS

Forrester just issued an insightful report on the increasing adoption of open source in the enterprise. The verdict? Open source is everywhere, and taking an ever-increasing piece of the enterprise pie:

Public sector embraces open source

Filed under
OSS

A snapshot survey organised by Kable and sponsored by Red Hat shows that just over a third of respondents are actually using open source, and close to another third are giving it consideration in their plans for the future.

How To Install VMware Server On Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to install the free VMware Server on an Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system.

The fine Ubuntu line between Commercial and Community

Filed under
Ubuntu

Right in the middle of a busy day for Ubuntu, basking in the success of the Dell-Canonical announcement that Dell will sell computers with Ubuntu pre-installed, came another development for the Ubuntu community: it seems some posts on the Ubuntu Planet mysteriously disappeared.

meld: graphical tool to diff and merge files

Filed under
Software

Every now and then we need to see the differences between two files. You forgot exactly what you changed in that Perl script, or you’d like to check what changes the intern made in Apache’s configuration, et cetera.

Linux Vendors Welcome Dell's Prebundling Move

Filed under
Linux

Leading Linux distributors Red Hat and Novell's SUSE have welcomed the news that Dell is going to prebundle Ubuntu Linux on certain consumer machines, saying the move is good for society, customers and the industry.

Ten Bleeding-Edge Open Source Companies

Filed under
OSS

If financial backing is any indicator, open-source companies are hot these days. In the past year, Linux Networx raised $37 million, Zend Technologies hauled in $20 million, and MontaVista scored $21 million. For those keeping an eye on exit strategies, last summer saw JBoss acquired by Red Hat for a cool $350 million.

Windows linked to... kidney stones?

Filed under
Microsoft

Jon Parshall, chief operating officer for CodeWeavers, a leading developer of Wine, which allows users to run Windows applications without Windows, recently suffered two weeks of mind-numbing agony and extraordinary urethral discomfort as a result of at least one or possibly more kidney stones. The cause: Windows.

Mounting file-systems by label rather than device name

Filed under
HowTos

When you're dealing with multiple drives, both fixed and removable, it can get hard to remember which is which. Remembering to mount /dev/sda1 in one place and /dev/sdc5 in another. The solution to this problem is to use labels instead of partition names when referring to them, and here we'll show how that can be done.

There are two things you need to do to start using labels:

School system taps Novell to control network indentity

Filed under
SUSE

The Fairfax County School District in Virginia, with more than 200 schools and 164,000 students, this week announced it will begin upgrading its legacy network provisioning and password management system with Novell's Identity Manager.

Fedora: Merge of Core and Extras takes place

Filed under
Linux

Jesse Keating announced on the Fedora Maintainers list that the merge of Fedora Core and Fedora Extras into one repository will take place this Wednesday.

Christchurch firm cleanses Niue govt of open source

Filed under
OSS

A Christchurch software developer has been charged with relieving the Niue government of its open source systems and replacing them with a Microsoft-based solution after the island encountered ongoing service and support issues.

Ubuntu on Dell desktops - Who loses?

Filed under
Ubuntu

In response to "overwhelming" customer demand, Dell will be selling some consumer models of its PCs with Ubuntu pre-installed. This is fantastic for Ubuntu, of course, but it's not necessarily bad for Novell and Red Hat.

Why?

First off, let's look at this in a larger context than SUSE vs. Red Hat vs. Ubuntu. As Steven Vaughan-Nichols writes in eWeek.

Community Interviews:

Filed under
Interviews

Rudd-0 interviews Brian Proffitt of Linux Today and The Jem Report interviews Ric Shreves of the Mambo Foundation.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

Today in Techrights