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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Hollywood and Congress Target Mozilla srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 5:01am
Story Learning from GNOME srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 1:12am
Story Unix and Linux: a bit of history srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 1:10am
Story Almost openSUSE 12.1 srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 1:08am
Poll Fav Distro (nov '11) srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:40pm
Story KDE vs. Trinity: Is One Really Better? srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:22pm
Story Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2011 is here srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:20pm
Story Ubuntu 11.11 is the new Mac OS X ? srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:11pm
Blog entry Sonic the Hedgehog went OpenSource? fieldyweb 15/11/2011 - 9:43pm
Story Linux Foundation Announces Four New Members srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 7:51pm

Preloaded Linux on Dell: Fact or Fiction?

Filed under
Linux

Having Linux preloaded on PCs from major vendors is a dream many in the Linux community have had for a long time. They have made significant Linux efforts for the enterprise and are involved in the Linux community in varying degrees. So why hasn't Linux appeared pre-loaded on PCs yet? It's simple: demand and dollars.

Is a Linux desktop avalanche coming?

Filed under
Linux

Slowly, ever so slowly, the Linux desktop has been picking up momentum. It keeps getting better and better, but Microsoft's monopoly has kept many PC users from realizing that there really is a viable alternative to Windows. However, that's about to change.

One-click email backup of OpenOffice.org documents

Filed under
HowTos

Gmail offers a few clever features that make it more than just an email service. You can use your Gmail account as a document viewer, a file storage, and even as a full-blown Getting Things Done solution. You can also turn Gmail into a nifty backup solution for your OpenOffice.org documents using a simple OOoBasic macro and Gmail's own tools.

The first political victory for open source

Filed under
OSS

The WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization) Development Agenda is usually a great way to put folks to sleep, but this week it represents what may be the first political victory for open source.

Linux almost desktop ready

Filed under
Linux

AFTER MORE THAN two years I have decided to put Linux to the test again to see if it is ready to become a home desktop yet. Here is what I tried and the results. Included PCLOS, Freespire, Mepis, and Ubuntu.

Some common beginner Linux installation issues

Filed under
Linux

In this cursory overview, Mark Rais, provides some of the common reasons why people brand new to Linux have installation failures. The brief article covers issues with Fedora, Gentoo, Mepis, PCLinuxOS, and Ubuntu.

Installing Puppet on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Puppet is a configuration automation tool that allows you to centralize management of the various *nix flavors running on your network. This is a step by step tutorial on how to install the server component of Puppet (puppetmaster) on one machine, and the Puppet client (puppetd) on another. We then perform a simple test to make sure Puppet is working properly.

Why Dell and other major hardware vendors won't do desktop Linux preinstallation

Filed under
Linux

The big problem with Linux preinstallation is that one size rarely fits all. Although modern community-driven distributions like Ubuntu and Fedora are designed for a broad audience, serious Linux users are very particular about how their systems are configured.

Linux: 2.6.21-rc2, Lots of Changes

Filed under
Linux

Announcing 2.6.21-rc2, Linus Torvalds noted, "I'm not very proud of this, because quite frankly, -rc2 has way more changes than I really like." The current Linux kernel development model is that the bulk of changes in a new kernel should happen during the -rc1 phase, with the rest of the -rc kernels being primarily bug fixes."

Mac vs. Linux: Which is More Secure?

Filed under
OS

In last month’s column, I said “I’m more secure on a Mac than I was on Windows XP.” Some of you asked how Linux fares in that comparison. To that, I’ll say I’m marginally more secure on Linux than on a Mac.

What Tech Companies Should Know About Linux Users

Filed under
Linux

It happened again this week. This time it was Dell, who asked the public what they'd like to see Dell offering. The overwhelming number-one response was "Linux machines". Then the inevitable foot-dragging began.

Securing Linux by breaking it with Damn Vulnerable Linux

Filed under
Linux

Damn Vulnerable Linux (DVL) is everything a good Linux distribution isn't. Its developers have spent hours stuffing it with broken, ill-configured, outdated, and exploitable software that makes it vulnerable to attacks. DVL isn't built to run on your desktop -- it's a learning tool for security students

Run Windows Apps on Linux using 2X ApplicationServer

Filed under
HowTos

I recently read an article describing how to run Windows apps on Linux using 2X ApplicationServer with Windows running as a virtual machine (VM) on the local system. It's a really cool sounding idea and overcomes some of the compatibility problems of Wine, but always having a Windows VM active consumes a lot of resources and may not always be the best solution.

Killing misbehaving programs and processes

Filed under
HowTos

I’d love to say it doesn’t happen on Linux, but very rarely it does. I can say it happens less often than on Windows, though. What am I talking about? Programs and processes misbehaving - locking up, stopping working and generally causing a problem.

Most popular websites 6 out of 7 powered by GNU/Linux - concludes survey

Filed under
Linux

Pingdom - an uptime monitoring company conducted a survey recently where it researched the technologies that power 7 most popular websites. All these websites except Alexaholic, exclusively use Linux as their choice of OS. Alexaholic is hosted on Windows.

Fedora Linux Leaves Its Users Behind?

Filed under
Linux

Those of you who are outside of the Linux circle of influences must have heard about Eric Raymond's rejection of Fedora. But if you ask me, the really interesting thing has been the public reaction to his comments in, well, the reader comments area of the article.

Also: The Terrible State of WiFi in Linux

beryl: usability, part 6

Filed under
HowTos

This is a quick howto on a not-so-well-known feature of beryl - drag and drop using the scale plugin.

Also: Tweak beryl for speed

So, How Does it Feel to have been Had?

Filed under
Linux

Mike Dell fires his CEO, takes control of Dell again and starts "A New Era of Innovation." He has his people put up a website asking US what we want in a Dell Computer. In no particular order, the tens of thousands of responses were:

Also: Linux and Dell - getting there?
And: Dell backs down from Linux promise

How to dual boot Linux and Windows XP (Linux installed first)

Filed under
HowTos

We're going to use the Gnome Partition Editor (Gparted) from the Ubuntu LiveCD to shrink the Ubuntu partition on the hard disk and create enough space for an installation of XP. We'll then install XP, and, because XP overwrites the master boot record, we'll restore the GRUB boot loader so that either XP or Linux can be selected at boot time.

UK government ignores open-source potential

Filed under
OSS

John Pugh MP argues that a bias against open-source within Whitehall has lead to schools and universities becoming too focused on proprietary technology.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora 25 Review: A Stable Release, But Slightly Slow to Boot (on rotational disks)

If you have a rotational disk, then Fedora 25 will be a little slow to boot and there is nothing you or I can do to fix it. But if you have an SSD, then you shall have no issues here. Other than that, I’m quite pleased with this release actually. Sure the responsiveness sucked the first time on, but as mentioned, it can be fixed, permanently. And the stability is also excellent. While I’m not a huge fan of the GNOMEShell (I think it’s stupid!), the ‘Classic’ session is also available, nonetheless. If you fancy giving it a go, then get it from here, but first make sure to read the release notes. Read more

KDE Leftovers

Parental Controls for Linux Unleashed

For years, one of the overlooked areas for the Linux desktop was access to “effective” parental controls. Back in 2003, I remember the now defunct Linspire (then known as Lindows) offered a proprietary option called SurfSafe. Surprisingly, at least back then, the product worked very well in providing accurate content filtering capabilities; something that was not,in fact, available and easy-to-use at that time. Years later, an open-source alternative was released to the greater Linux community known as GNOME Nanny. Fantastic in terms of usage control, its web content web filter was laughably terrible. As expected, crowd-sourcing a filtering list isn’t a great solution. And like SurfSafe, the project is now defunct. Read more

Chapeau 24 Cancellara - Same same but different

Fedora plus Moka icons plus some extra software, mainly coming from proprietary sources. I guess that's the best way to describe Chapeau. But then, what separates one distro from another if not a collection of decorations, as software is essentially the same, apart from a very small number of standalone distributions trying to develop their own identity with their own desktop environments and app stack, re: elementary or Solus + Budgie? Except they struggle, too. Chapeau 24 is a nice effort to make Fedora friendlier, but then it does not achieve the needed result without pain. The biggest issues included a botched smartphone support. Samba woes and the horrible bootloader bug. Other than that, it behaved more or less the same way as the parent distro. Then again, why bother if you can pimp up Fedora without any loss of functionality? I do like Chapeau Cancellara, but I cannot ignore the fact Fedora does the same with fewer problems. All in all, it's a welcome effort, but it needs more polish. It does not quite capture the heart the way Fuduntu did. And with some issues looming high above the distro, the grade can only be about 6/10. Most importantly, the bootloader setup must be flawless, and there's not excuse for small app errors that we've seen. We know it can do more. Anyhow, if you're not keen on any self-service round Fedora, this could be a good test bed for your games. A moderately worthy if somewhat risky and flawed experience. Read more