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Monday, 18 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Wine (Wine is not an emulator) 1.7.36 Gives Users Control over Speakers Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:20pm
Story Manjaro 0.8.12 KDE Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:16pm
Story 9-Way Linux Laptop Performance Comparison From Intel Nehalem To Broadwell Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:04pm
Story Korora 21 available Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 8:55pm
Story LQ Poll Results Expected and Unexpected Roy Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 7:59pm
Story Can Android One prove successful? Roy Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:47am
Story Mesa 10.4.4 Released Roy Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:06am
Story Can Open-Source Voting Tech Fix The U.S. Elections System? Roy Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 8:57am
Story Exclusive: Pivotal CEO says open source Hadoop tech is coming Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 8:52am
Story 4MLinux 11.1 Delivers Maintenance, Miniserver, Multimedia and Mystery Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 8:48am

What's up with the GNOME Linux Desktop?

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: It takes money and it takes new ideas to build a better desktop, both of which are being raised by the open source GNOME Foundation. GNOME is one of the most popular Linux desktop GUIs and is included in nearly every Linux distribution.

Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2009 Review

Filed under
MDV

linuxbsdos.com: Mandriva Linux Powerpack is one of three editions of the Linux desktop published by Mandriva. Mandriva Linux Powerpack is the commercial edition, and costs 49 EUR, or 62 USD. In this tutorial, we take a somewhat detailed review of Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2009.

Also: Distro Test: Mandriva Linux 2009 Kde 4 edition

The Last Gasp for Linux on the Desktop?

Filed under
Linux

ibeentoubuntu.com: I've been using Linux on the desktop for almost eleven years now. I enjoy it. I understand it. I'm not likely to ever leave it. I also know that I'm in a niche market. There were predictions that each year would be the "Year of Linux" and we all know where that led.

Four winning ways to monitor machines through Web interfaces

Filed under
Software

linux.com: System administrators need to keep an eye on their servers to make sure things are running smoothly. If they find a problem, they need to see when it started, so investigations can focus on what happened at that time. Here's a look at several tools that let you monitor one or more servers from a Web interface.

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Smoothly Transfer From Windows to Linux

  • Intrepid Ibex Release Party almost got arrested
  • What bloggers think of Ubuntu 8.10
  • Updating to Intrepid: Notes
  • Avoiding regressions more important than on-time release

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up an Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Debian Project News - November 3rd

  • Ubuntu’s Linux contributions
  • Top 10 improvements Ubuntu should work on
  • FSF Releases New Version of GNU Free Documentation License
  • Can Drupal beat Wordpress?
  • Mepis Fix for Mounting NTFS Partitions
  • Community relations key to open source success
  • Mandriva - Day 1, Day 2
  • Two additional ways to tail a log file
  • Fedora Classroom begins November 8
  • Filling the Open Source Usability Testing Gap
  • Acer Aspire One, and Power Saving in Ubuntu
  • Stormy Peters about Marketing GNOME
  • OpenOffice 3.0 Beefs Up Collaboration, Extensions
  • RPM Fusion For Fedora Officially Launches
  • 3 out of 10 Asus PCs run desktop Linux
  • Linux Outlaws 62 - Ballmer Island
  • There is a BBC in my Amarok

Why I switched to the OLPC—and why I dropped it

Filed under
OLPC
OSS

Richard M. Stallman: The One Laptop Per Child project, launched by MIT professor Nicholas Negroponte in 2003, was supposed to lead millions of children around the world to information technology and freedom. The plans aimed for low cost, enabling many children to use the machines, and free software, so they would have freedom while using them. I thought it was a good idea. But...

Motorola and Google become GNOME sponsors

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The GNOME Foundation announced today that Google and Motorola have joined the organization's advisory board and will sponsor ongoing development of the open source desktop environment.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Speed Up Linux Hard Drives by Disabling Atime

  • Installing Ubuntu 8.10 To A USB Flash Drive
  • Blender 2.46 Tutorial - Boning
  • Graphical Remote Control Desktops for Linux, part 2
  • Enable Apple iSight Camera : Ubuntu 8.10
  • TimeVault simplifies data backup for Ubuntu users
  • Simplify GRUB tweaks with Startup Manager
  • Using the zoom to view 2+ pages in the editable view, in OOo

Linux Vs. Windows 7: The Coming Showdown

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

informationweek.com/blog: It's inevitable. I don't have the Windows 7 bits on hand, myself, but I know that one of the first things I plan to do once I get them -- it's a "when", not an "if" -- is to throw it onto the same hardware as my various Linux installations and see how things behave.

The Linux Four and the heat they pack

Filed under
Linux

bushweed.blogspot: t seems that Linux distribution releases are getting closer together, or maybe i'm just noticing it now. Remembering, my compatriot, Mr Shuttleworth's call for coordinated releases, it might be an obvious question to see the differences in packages and their versions.

Linux: The Joe Sixpack Strategy

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: On the surface, it would appear that a slowing economy might pave the way for increased Linux and Open Source software adoption by the unwashed masses.

Is Ubuntu killing other distributions?

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: First, it was the Debian people who were jealous of the success of Ubuntu. They, at least, had some reason to be annoyed. Now it appears there are others, from other distributions, who are envious too, and try to guise their envy under a veil of concern for GNU/Linux as a whole.

Ubuntu 8.10 - All Hail new Network Manager

Filed under
Ubuntu

theregister.co.uk: Canonical, the developers behind Ubuntu Linux have release Intrepid Ibex, the successor to last spring's Hardy Heron release. Ibex isn't a long-term support release - which might put off some large organizations - but for Ubuntu desktop fans, version 8.10 makes a worthwhile upgrade.

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 4 Now Available

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The openSUSE Project is happy to announce the availability of openSUSE 11.1 beta 4. This release includes a number of important bugfixes since the last beta, as well as a few new bugs that need to be squashed before the final release.

Review : KDE 4.1

Filed under
KDE

linuxondesktop.blogspot: KDE was one of the first desktop environment I used , when I started using Linux Back In 1998 , KDE was just out of beta and KDE Team had just released 1.0 version of the Desktop Environment. There was nothing exceptionally different in KDE that gnome did not offer, TILL NOW !!!

Wayland: A New X Server For Linux

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: It's no secret that much of the code-base that makes up the modern-day X.Org Server is old and in some places bloated. The X.Org Server continues to evolve and has received a number of major additions in recent times, but wouldn't a clean and lighter server that is designed around today's needs be ideal?

30 Cool Linux Login Screens

Filed under
Software

hehe2.net: One of the most powerful attributes that are running for Linux as opposed to other OS’es is it flexibility and customizibility. Its one of the first things mentioned when a Linux geek is asked about Linux. And we love to show it. I trekked Gnome Look and KDE Look and chose for you these 30 great login screen themes.

Why Your Next Computer Might Be A Linux PC

Filed under
Linux

readwriteweb.com: It's the perfect storm. Computer manufacturers have figured out how to produce lightweight, low-end machines that cost very little just as the economy takes a big tumble. Meanwhile, software applications that once needed robust hardware to run are now moving to the cloud. The result? An explosion of netbooks.

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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Using Open Source Software in a SecDevOps Environment
    On 21 June 2018 the Open Source Software3 Institute is hosting a discussion that should be of high interest to enterprise technologists in the DC/Northern Virginia, Maryland area. From their invite: Come hear from our panelists about how the worlds of Open Source Software and the Secure Development / Operations (SecDevOps) intersect and strengthen one another. SecDevOps seeks to embed security in the development process as deeply as DevOps has done with operations, and Open Source Software is a major factor in Security, Development, and Operations. Tickets are free, but you need to register soon because seating is limited.
  • TenFourFox FPR8b1 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 beta 1 is now available (downloads, release notes, hashes). There is much less in this release than I wanted because of a family member in the hospital and several technical roadblocks. Of note, I've officially abandoned CSS grid again after an extensive testing period due to the fact that we would need substantial work to get a functional implementation, and a partially functional implementation is worse than none at all (in the latter case, we simply gracefully degrade into block-level divs). I also was not able to finish the HTML input date picker implementation, though I've managed to still get a fair amount completed of it, and I'll keep working on that for FPR9. The good news is, once the date picker is done, the time picker will use nearly exactly the same internal plumbing and can just be patterned off it in the same way. Unlike Firefox's implementation, as I've previously mentioned our version uses native OS X controls instead of XUL, which also makes it faster. That said, it is a ghastly hack on the Cocoa widget side and required some tricky programming on 10.4 which will be the subject of a later blog post.
  • GNU dbm 1.15
    GDBM tries to detect inconsistencies in input database files as early as possible. When an inconcistency is detected, a helpful diagnostics is returned and the database is marked as needing recovery. From this moment on, any GDBM function trying to access the database will immediately return error code (instead of eventually segfaulting as previous versions did). In order to reconstruct the database and return it to healthy state, the gdbm_recover function should be used.

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.