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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Dear Computer Makers: I Want an Ubuntu Notebook! Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 7:59pm
Story Linus Torvalds and the cults of niceness and diversity Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:56am
Story GNU LibreJS 6.0.8 released Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:48am
Story Improving KDE's support for Korean (and other CJK languages) Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:18am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 9:49pm
Story Castilla-La Mancha nurtures open source sector Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 8:25pm
Story Android Lollipop vs. Android KitKat: New Features & Material Design Explored Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 8:11pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 5:11pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 5:10pm
Story Systemd-Import Expands Its Container Capabilities Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 4:35pm

Firestarter - A modern Linux Firewall

Filed under
Software

brajeshwar.com: Irrespective of the operating system, intrusion is one of the key concerns for computers connected to a network. Firewalls, as a matter of fact provide a resistance to this, if not a fool proof protection.

Four password lockers that can help you keep your Web logins secure

Filed under
Software

linux.com: It is good practice to use a different password for each Web site you need to log in to. Good passwords tend to be long and contain a wide selection of characters. That can make remembering all your passwords difficult. But you can make things easier on yourself by storing passwords for various Web sites in an encrypted file on your computer.

Compositing With Metacity - An Early Look

Filed under
Software

hehe2.net: When the compositing capabilities of Spiftacity merged into the Metacity trunk, it caused a fair bit of stir among GNOME users. Included in version 2.21.5 of GNOME, though hidden from casual users, the compositing showed a lot of promise but remained just something to play around with.

Why OpenOffice.org Failed – and What to Do About It

Filed under
OOo

Glyn Moody: Last week I noted that the release of OpenOffice.org 3.0 seems to mark an important milestone in its adoption, judging at least by the healthy – and continuing – rate of downloads. But in many ways, success teaches us nothing; what is far more revealing is failure.

Opera 9.61 released

Filed under
Software

opera.com: Hot on the heels of 9.60, we had to release Opera 9.61 to address problems in Opera Link. Alone, each issue we discovered was miniscule and shouldn't have caused any problems, but together, and coupled with some server issues, it turned out to be more serious than we thought.

In these trying economic times will Linux be the answer

Filed under
Linux

dthomasdigital.wordpress: I was told today that if I’m lucky my budget will only be cut by 10%. Being that I work for State government you would think that I would be more worried than I am. Then why do I think this is a great opportunity for me?

Why should Microsoft fans want (even help!) Linux to succeed

Imagine that your football team wins the championship the last years and it has completely crashed all competition. Would you be happy with the way your team played with no competition at all? It would surely play crappy, because it wouldn't need to try any harder.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Debian Project News - October 20th, 2008

  • gOS To Support Intel's Moblin Project
  • Gallery 2.3 (Skidoo) Released
  • Novell Betas Open Enterprise Server 2 SP1
  • Inquisitor stresses and benchmarks your hardware
  • Canonical Hiring KDE Desktop Developer
  • The dying embers of Microsoft's IP claims against open source
  • Back to Linux
  • Vinyl + Audacity = MP3
  • Test Drive Firefox 3.1 Beta 1
  • Where Would We Be Without Open Source?
  • Memory lane: Microsoft blames Red Hat for not making Linux popular enough
  • Perspectives extension improves HTTPS security
  • Re: Switch to Ubuntu Linux not Apple Mac OS
  • Novell's identity management gets some open-source competition
  • Indian political party turns to FOSS
  • Mandriva and Turbolinux to Join Moblin Project to Expand Atom-Based Products
  • Linux Foundation Reports on First End User Summit
  • UK gains LPI affiliate
  • Firefox new tab page to change

OpenOffice.org 3.0 scores strong first week

Filed under
OOo

computerworld.com: OpenOffice.org 3.0 was downloaded 3 million times in its first week, with about 80% of the downloads by Windows users, an official with the group said in a blog post on Monday.

Worldwide 2009 Mandriva Linux Installfest

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com: In order to bring Linux to new users and present the new features and technologies available in Mandriva Linux 2009, Mandriva is mobilizing its network of Linux User Groups (LUGs) to coordinate a worldwide Installfest on November 22nd, November 2008.

Community vs. Commercial GNU/Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: You can categorize most GNU/Linux distributions as either community or commercial. Community-based distributions like Debian, Fedora, or CentOS are maintained largely by volunteers and donations of services or money, while commercial distributions like Suse, Red Hat, or Xandros are backed by a company and compete directly against proprietary operating systems such as Windows and OS X.

Open Source Is Far From Free

Filed under
OSS

law.com: In his highly acclaimed best seller, The World is Flat, Thomas Friedman hails open-sourcing as one of 10 "flatteners" of the world. Nevertheless, many enterprises have included open-source code in their proprietary software without fully understanding the risks.

Ubuntu 8.10 “Intrepid Ibex” feels more like a service pack than a new release

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.zdnet.com: With only ten days to go until Ubuntu 8.10 is released I decided to take a look at the latest beta to see what the new release has to offer. Oddly enough, “Intrepid Ibex” feels more like a service pack to me than a new release.

How much have you saved by using GNU/Linux?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: At a time when economic problems dog the world, people's thoughts generally turn to saving. It is not surprising, therefore, to find many technology writers beginning to recognise that GNU/Linux and other open source software can reduce the amount that companies spend on IT.

Mandriva 2009 on the Asus EeeBox

Filed under
MDV

eeextra.com: Every major distribution generates a lot of hype at launch, and the new Mandriva 2009 did not depart from the rule. After completing the installation, I have used the new system for a few days and would like to share my first impressions.

Review: Pioneer Dreambook Light IL1

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

polishlinux.org: Cheap notebooks with preinstalled Linux distributions conquer Western markets. Polish hardware distributors did notice it and one of them launched a new subnotebook in the Polish market. They call it: Airis I-Design IL-1 Nanobook.

10 reasons for switching to a different Linux distribution

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Sooner or later, you’re going to get the urge to switch distributions — maybe for a change of pace or maybe out of more practical considerations. Here’s a look at some of the most common reasons users feel compelled to make that jump.

OpenOffice.org Base is No Microsoft Access Replacement

Filed under
OOo

eweek.com: The OpenOffice.org 3.0 desktop database application offers new features that make it better than previous versions, but it still lags behind what Microsoft Access offers. Among the key concerns is OpenOffice.org Base's limited filed support for Microsoft Access database files.

Fedora's Cobbler project to automate Linux deployments

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: While most members of the Fedora open source community have begun to develop new features for the next version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), over the past two years some have worked to simplify everyday systems administration tasks such as installing and provisioning servers over a network.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Quickly Convert Ogg Theora to Flash Video

  • Linux: Find and remove matching files
  • Take Screenshots in Xfce
  • Configure LVM in Mandriva Linux Free 2009
  • Resizing Logical Volume (LVM) on ext3
  • Emacs - Getting Paragraphs to Wrap Lines
  • Bash Script To Access Wikipedia
  • Linux setup default gateway with route command
  • Converting 2.35 Aspect Video to DVD
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10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more