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Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Ralink Help For Ubuntu Feisty

Filed under
HowTos

lockergnome: If you are reading this, chances are you are running a RT2500 based chipset wireless card that worked perfectly with Ubuntu Edgy and then stopped working after your upgrade to Feisty. I have a solution for you that will hopefully offer you a way to get around Ubuntu’s latest wireless “fix”.

Hate an application? Shoot it.

Filed under
Software

fosswire: Have you ever gotten really mad at an application and just wanted to blast a huge hole in it? With blast that is exactly what you can do. Use your system’s preferred package manager to install the blast package.

A Sample Function inline with Bashprompt

Filed under
HowTos

systhread.net: The bash prompt has built in commands that use escape charachter syntax. By default a lot of packages ship bash with a default that shows the hostname and relative path. The escape sequences for all users is usually kept in /etc/bashrc or a similar system location.

Dell: Interest in Linux Outside the United States

Filed under
Linux

direct2dell: On IdeaStorm, Linux and open source-related ideas are commonly some of the most popular ones. Currently the Sell Linux PCs Worldwide idea by ergo and Dell Ubuntu for Europe by yesmathew are near the top of the front page of IdeaStorm. In other words, they are recently popular ideas.

Linux configure point to point tunneling PPTP VPN client for Microsoft PPTP vpn server

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software
Security
BSD
Ubuntu
HowTos

With this tip you will be able to work from home using VPN and that too from Linux / FreeBSD system for the proprietary Microsoft Point-to-Point vpn server.

Enterprise Open Source Is Not Just the Code

Filed under
OSS

linux.sys-con.com: After infiltrating corporate operating systems and middleware products, open source software has in recent years moved into enterprise applications with great success.

Also: Open source 'not relevant', claim CIOs

Give Firefox a Safari-Style Address Bar

Filed under
Moz/FF

One of the coolest features about Safari is the address bar. It doubles as a loading bar, and the shaded color behind it progresses across the address bar as the page loads. Well, now you can duplicate that functionality with the Fission extension for Firefox.

Also: A Firefox extension to animate PNGs

Why Dell should offer more than just Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

seopher.com: In the US Dell has famously started offering Ubuntu on selected machines as a direct alternative to XP or Vista. Fortunately these machines cost less than their Windows counterparts and that's good, but Dell really should consider moving beyond offering Ubuntu; and here's why.

Ars at WWDC: Interview with Lars Knoll, creator of KHTML

Filed under
Interviews

arstechnica: Ars Technica sat down today to talk with KHTML developer and Trolltech employee, Lars Knoll. We talked about his involvement in the project that ultimately became the HTML rendering engine for Apple's Safari web browser.

iTunes in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

pimp you linux: Will apple release iTunes for Linux? Not anytime soon. So what solutions does the open source community have? Wine.

Spice up Windows - replace it! [with Linux]; part 5

Filed under
HowTos

A Blog Of Gentoo: In my few previous posts I've stated that I'd like to help people to spice their system and move from Windows to Linux. But we all know that it cannot be done in an instant. This time I will explain the 5th step: Playing around.

Kilted Debian lovers to overrun Edinburgh

Filed under
Linux

the Register: Here's a poser for you: could there be anything more frightening than a bunch of open source geeks (proud ones, at that) milling around the mean streets of Edinburgh? Well, yes. How about if you put some of them in special Debian kilts?

Linux: Dual-Licensing the Kernel

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "I was impressed in the sense that it was a hell of a lot better than the disaster that were the earlier drafts," Linus Torvalds explained in reply to a comment suggesting that he was impressed with the final draft of the GPLv3. He went on to add, "I still think GPLv2 is simply the better license." The discussion began with a suggestion that the Linux kernel be dual-licensed GPLv2 and GPLv3.

Also: The Linux Kernel on a Dual Basis?

Dell Ubuntu Machines Start Hitting the Streets, Answering Q's

Filed under
Ubuntu

eWeek: Dell's customer feedback-driven initiative for preloading Linux on some of the machines it sells is moving forward with a full head of steam. It's too early to judge the success or failure of Dell's mainstream Linux foray.

GIMP 2.3.18 Development Release

Filed under
GIMP

GIMP 2.3.18 is a snapshot of current development towards GIMP 2.4. This release not only fixes the bug that made 2.3.17 crash every so often, it also improves the quality of the zoomed out image view and provides better performance when working with large images.

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.0 (i386)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.0 system (i386). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.

10 Open Source Apps for Enterprise Users

Filed under
Software

intranetjournal.com: In articles past, we have examined both the up-and-coming open source projects to watch, and which open source applications you simply cannot live without. But where does this leave the enterprise user? Often times, the need of the enterprise user differs from that of the home-office/small-office worker. In this article, I'll explore viable open source solutions available for today's enterprise environment.

If you want lemonade. Buy lemons.

Filed under
Linux

ittoolbox blogs: Every operating system has its own fans. Some are hard core, some are enthusiastic and others are practical. However all too often there are flame wars and arguments over which is better. This does nothing but inflame the stalwart proponents of the enemy camp so to speak.

Donorweb Draws On Red Hat to Promote Blood Donation in Singapore

Filed under
Linux

smbedge.com: Red Hat announced end-May 2007 that Donorweb has selected Red Hat Enterprise Linux to run its mission-critical applications and SMS messaging gateway critical to recruiting and retaining regular blood donors in Singapore and also important in meeting the national blood requirements.

US Patent Office to Try 'Open Source' Approach

Filed under
Misc

betanews.com: As urgent appeals for lawmakers to finally address multiple defects in US patent law appear to finally be taken seriously, the US Patent and Trademark Office is considering riding this wave of upheaval and making a tremendous change of its own: Last week, it announced its official support of a Web site whose purpose will be to encourage citizens to assess the validity of patent applications for themselves, and issue challenges where necessary.

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More in Tux Machines

New GNU/Linux Releases: TheSSS, Arkas OS, Black Lab, and Parrot

  • The Smallest Server Suite Gets Special Edition with PHP 7.0.15, Apache 2.4.25
    4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia about the availability of a special edition of the TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) Live Linux operating system. Carrying the same version number as the original TheSSS release, namely 21.0, and dubbed TheSSS7, the new flavor ships with more recent PHP packages from the 7.0.x series. Specifically, TheSSS7 includes PHP 7.0.15, while TheSSS comes with PHP 5.6.30.
  • Descent OS Is Dead, Arkas OS Takes Its Place and It's Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    Some of you out there might remember the Descent OS distro created by Brian Manderville and based on the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, and today we have some bad news for them as the development is now officially closed. Descent OS first appeared in February 2012 as a lightweight Ubuntu derivative built around the GNOME 2 desktop environment. Back then, it was known as Descent|OS, and was quite actively developed with new features and components borrowed from the latest Ubuntu releases.
  • Black Lab Linux 8.1 Out Now with LibreOffice 5.3, It's Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    Softpedia was informed today by the Black Lab Software project about the general availability of the first point release to the Black Lab Linux 8.0 operating system series. Serving as a base release to the company's enterprise offerings and equipped with all the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel from the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, Black Lab Linux 8.1 comes with up-to-date components and the latest security patches ported from Ubuntu's repositories as of February 15, 2017. "Today we are pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Linux 8.1. Our first incremental release to the 8.0 series. In this release we have brought all security updates up to Feb 15, 2017, as well as application updates," said Roberto J. Dohnert, CEO of Black Lab Software.
  • Parrot 3.5 – Call For Betatesters
    We did our best to prepare these preview images including all the updates and the new features introduced since the last release, but now we need your help to understand how to make it even better, and of course we need your help to understand if there is something that doesn’t work as expected or something that absolutely needs to be included in the final release.

Linux and Graphics

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Now Available for Linux Lite Users, Here's How to Install It
    Minutes after the release of Linux kernel 4.10 last evening, Jerry Bezencon from the Linux Lite project announced that users of the Ubuntu-based distribution can now install it on their machines. Linux 4.10 is now the most advanced kernel branch for all Linux-based operating systems, and brings many exciting new features like virtual GPU support, better writeback management, eBPF hooks for cgroups, as well as Intel Cache Allocation Technology support for the L2/L3 caches of Intel processors.
  • Wacom's Intuos Pro To Be Supported By The Linux 4.11 Kernel
    Jiri Kosina submitted the HID updates today for the Linux 4.11 kernel cycle.
  • Mesa 13.0.5 Released for Linux Gamers with over 70 Improvements, Bug Fixes
    We reported the other day that Mesa 13.0.5 3D Graphics Library will be released this week, and it looks like Collabora's Emil Velikov announced it earlier this morning for all Linux gamers. Mesa 13.0.5 is a maintenance update to the Mesa 13.0 stable series of the open source graphics stack used by default in numerous, if not all GNU/Linux distributions, providing gamers with powerful drivers for their AMD Radeon, Nvidia, and Intel GPUs. It comes approximately three weeks after the Mesa 13.0.4 update.
  • mesa 13.0.5

Interview: Thomas Weissel Installing Plasma in Austrian Schools

With Plasma 5 having reached maturity for widespread use we are starting to see rollouts of it in large environments. Dot News interviewed the admin behind one such rollout in Austrian schools. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Top Lightweight Linux Distributions To Try In 2017
    Today I am going to discuss the top lightweight Linux distros you can try this year on your computer. Although you got yourself a prettyLinuxle linux already but there is always something new to try in Linux. Remember I recommend to try this distros in virtualbox firstly or with the live boot before messing with your system. All distro that I will mention here will be new and somewhat differ from regular distros.
  • [ANNOUNCE] linux-4.10-ck1 / MuQSS CPU scheduler 0.152
  • MSAA Compression Support For Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver
    Intel developer Jason Ekstrand posted a patch over the weekend for enabling MSAA compression support within the ANV Vulkan driver.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 31
    As we announced in the previous report, our 31th Scrum sprint was slightly shorter than the usual ones. But you would never say so looking to this blog post. We have a lot of things to talk you about!
  • Comparing Mobile Subscriber Data Across Different Sources - How accurate is the TomiAhonen Almanac every year?
    You’ll see that last spring I felt the world had 7.6 Billion total mobile subscriptions when machine-to-machine (M2M) connections are included. I felt the world had 7.2 Billion total subscriptions when excluding M2M and just counting those in use by humans. And the most relevant number (bottom line) is the ‘unique’ mobile users, which I felt was an even 5.0 Billion humans in 2015. The chart also has the total handsets-in-use statistic which I felt was 5.6 Billion at the end of 2015. Note that I was literally the first person to report on the distinction of the unique user count vs total subscriptions and I have been urging, nearly begging for the big industry giants to also measure that number. They are slowly joining in that count. Similarly to M2M, we also are now starting to see others report M2M counts. I have yet to see a major mobile statistical provider give a global count of devices in use. That will hopefully come also, soon. But lets examine these three numbers that we now do have other sources, a year later, to see did I know what I was doing.