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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 17/05/2011 - 3:56am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 17/05/2011 - 3:46am
Story Open-source software, Linux to save Santos $2.5m srlinuxx 17/05/2011 - 2:53am
Story 2 Anonymous Web Browsers That Are Completely Private & Secure srlinuxx 17/05/2011 - 2:51am
Story Mono Continues without Novell / Attachmate srlinuxx 17/05/2011 - 2:50am
Story elementary OS 0.1 Jupiter - Unremarkable srlinuxx 16/05/2011 - 11:55pm
Story How I found Enlightenment srlinuxx 16/05/2011 - 11:54pm
Story Mozilla Plans End to Firefox 3.5 srlinuxx 16/05/2011 - 9:44pm
Story 9 Slackware Based Live Distributions srlinuxx 16/05/2011 - 9:42pm
Story 6 Important Changes in Oneiric Ocelot srlinuxx 16/05/2011 - 9:39pm

Get top-quality scans from your scanner with Lprof

Filed under
HowTos

The key to getting first-rate image output on any operating system is setting up a good workflow. One piece of the workflow puzzle that used to be out of reach for Linux users is device profiling -- accurately measuring hardware devices like scanners and monitors to account for their differing capabilities. But a relatively young open source application called Lprof does a professional job at that task.

Blizzard banned all Linux users from WoW yesterday

Filed under
Web

"This account has been found to have employed third party software designed to automate many aspects of the World of Warcraft game play experience. Such software runs contrary to the essence of World of Warcraft and provides an advantage over other players."

Monitor your Linux computer with machine-generated music

Filed under
Linux

Use Perl and FluidSynth to create a real-time musical composition of your system status. Learn how to integrate various system monitoring data into a harmony-producing, MIDI-controlled audio synthesis. Explore audible information methods and configurations to help you monitor and manage your computing environment.

Linux Tricks - Keeping your Ubuntu/Debian machines clean

Filed under
HowTos

I tend to install a lot of stuff on my Ubuntu machines. Much of this I do for curiosity and then report it here. This means that not only do I get to check out lots of interesting stuff, but my machines also start getting cluttered with stale files, old versions and orphaned files.

Here are two quick ways to help clean up your system.

Bash Tricks: Numbering Lines

Filed under
HowTos

Now and then you want to number the lines of a file. You can roll your own script to do that:

Complete Story.

Christopher Blizzard: first olpc machine in cambridge

Filed under
Hardware

We received our first machine in the Cambridge today from the plant in Taiwan. This is one of the hand-assembled models running the browser in Sugar. There are some more pictures in the wiki! Even one where I look pretty grumpy.

Pix Here.

Step-by-Step IPP based Print Server using CUPS

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial describes how to install a Linux print server with CUPS. It also covers the installation and configuration of printer drivers on the print server as well as the printer setup on a Windows 2000 client.

Review: Sony's PS3 versus Nintendo's Wii

Filed under
Hardware

Nintendo Co. Ltd. and Sony Corp.'s next-generation game consoles are finally ready for play, and bring significant advances to the gaming world. We tested the $599 PS3 that features a 60GB drive and 802.11b/g wireless networking plus Memory Stick, SD Card, and CompactFlash media slots. The Wii (pronounced "we") costs $250 and builds in Wi-Fi (but not ethernet).

ATI 8.31.5 Display Drivers

Filed under
Software

There have been speculations and rumors going around since AMD formally announced they would be acquiring ATI Technologies. Of the questions that had appeared were whether AMD would continue with the ATI brand name for its graphics processors and Chipsets. With today's new 8.31.5 fglrx release, the release notes are beginning referring to them as AMD Proprietary Display Drivers. Is this a sign of the elimination of the ATI brand as we know it?

Mark Shuttleworth: Pervasive presence

Filed under
OSS

This is one post in a series, describing challenges we need to overcome to make free software ubiquitous on the desktop.

Cedega 5.2 review

Filed under
Reviews

It's been said many times in many forums, blog posts, mailing lists, and comment sections: GNU/Linux won't really go far as a desktop operating system unless it can play the same games that Microsoft Windows can. For years, TransGaming has tried to make the dream of running Windows games in GNU/Linux into reality, and to a small extent it has succeeded with its Cedega, so this review will take a look at the state of Cedega circa version 5.2.7.

Who Else Gains from a GPL'd Java?

Filed under
OSS

Sun's announcement that it would be releasing Java under the GNU GPL confounded many of its critics (including myself) who had feared that the company was incapable of making such a bold move. Quite rightly, it has garnered praise from across the hacker world. But Sun's relationship with free software has not always been so idyllic.

EU gives Microsoft a deadline for antitrust compliance

Filed under
Microsoft

The European Union's top antitrust official, Neelie Kroes, gave Microsoft an ultimatum Wednesday, saying that it had eight more days to comply with an EU antitrust order or face daily fines of up to €3 million.

OOoBasic crash course: Multi-format document backup

Filed under
HowTos

In previous OOoBasic crash course articles we've created a few simple macros. If you're ready for more advanced stuff, let's create a macro that allows you to save the currently opened document in several formats. This macro can come in handy for archiving purposes and for exchanging files with other users.

Linux ... Maybe It's Time You Thought About It

Filed under
Linux

There is an alternative to MS Windows as an operating System for your computer, and it's not a Macintosh. In the last few years, Linux has blossomed into a full fledged Desktop system and is comparable to Windows in every respect except the installed user base.

Book Review: Fedora Linux

Filed under
Reviews

This book will get you up to speed quickly on Fedora Linux, a securely-designed Linux distribution that includes a massive selection of free software packages. Fedora is hardened out-of-the-box, it’s easy to install, and extensively customizable - and this book shows you how to make Fedora work for you.

Euro firms cool on Vista and Linux

Filed under
OS

European businesses are only considering migrating to Linux when they decide to deploy new applications, but most currently have no intention of moving to Windows Vista either, according to a survey released this week.

Microsoft admits open source patent pledge misses the target

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp has admitted execution flaws with its promise not to sue open source software developers and invited the wider community to tell the software firm how it can get it right.

Has Microsoft conceded the desktop OS market to Linux?

Filed under
OS

Microsoft has long dominated the home desktop Operating System market while Unix and Unix-like systems have dominated the server and datacenter world. Have Microsoft's continuous product delays, removal of highly touted new features, addition of more intrusive DRM and the introduction of a highly restrictive EULA sealed Microsoft's fate?

For Funambol, open source software makes business sense

Filed under
Software

Funambol, an open source Java-based SyncML application, reached a milestone in September with the release of v3.0. The software provides calendar and address book linkage for groupware and mobile devices. Funambol started out more than three years ago as Sync4j, with a project on SourceForge.net. From humble beginnings, Funambol has today become a company that sells commercial support contracts, but still makes its software available under the GPL.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box