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Saturday, 19 Aug 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

A look at UHU-Linux 2.1 RC2

Filed under
Linux

beranger: More than one year ago, I reviewed UHU-Linux 2.0, and I very much liked it. Now, when UHU-Linux 2.1 is about to be released (I don't understand Hungarian, so I can't read their forums, but I suspect they want to release before Christmas), I tested UHU-Linux 2.1 RC2 (released on 12/16), downloaded from here: uhu-linux-2.1-rc2-dvd.iso.

Dragon Player 2.0 Alpha 1 released

Filed under
KDE

monroe.nu: So I've decided to rename Codeine/Video Player to Dragon Player. Its named in honor of KDE's mascot Konqui of course. I've also gone ahead and made a release, Dragon Player 2.0 Alpha 1.

Also: First panorama in Krita

Can We Avoid the Great Schism?

Filed under
OSS

Gyn Moody: Choice is an important element of free software, so it's perhaps no surprise that even at the level of the desktop environment there is more than one offering. But the main alternatives – KDE and GNOME – represent more than just a way of placing icons on a screen. Nowhere is that more evident than in their respective views on Microsoft's OOXML document standard, which are very far apart – perhaps dangerously so.

For Your Business: GNOME or KDE?

Filed under
Software

matt hartley: I am writing this piece in hopes of sharing what each desktop offering has to provide and which of these options makes the most sense for your business.

Firefox 3 Beta 2 now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

developer.mozilla.org: Firefox 3 Beta 2 is now available for download. This is the tenth developer milestone focused on testing the core functionality provided by many new features and changes to the platform scheduled for Firefox 3.

Dell Adds Ubuntu 7.10 and Built-In DVD playback

Filed under
Ubuntu

direct2dell.com: Today, we're adding Ubuntu 7.10 (a.k.a Gutsy Gibbon) to the Dell Consumer Linux line-up for customers in the United States. It will also be available on the Inspiron 530 in England, France, and Germany later this week.

GNOME, OOXML, and Half-Truths Colliding in the Night

Filed under
OSS

Bruce Byfield: The average user probably hasn't even heard of Open Document Format (ODF) or Microsoft Office Open XML (OOXML). With both formats candidates for being the ISO standard that becomes the norm for interoperability between office suites, emotions were already running high. However, this issue has been sidetracked by a debate about whether the GNOME Foundation has betrayed or assisted the community by being involved with the development of OOXML at all.

Cooking with Linux - Still Searching for the Ultimate Linux Distro?

Filed under
Linux

Marcel Gagné: What distribution are you loading up today, François? Are you having trouble finding something you like? You like them all but you just can't choose, eh? Well, mon ami.

Open Source Challenge part 10: The verdict.

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: Ten parts ago we embarked on this journey to see just how well Linux, and specifically Ubuntu, would handle being the sole operating system on my system and if it would handle everything I needed to do from work to play, day to day.

Traffic Officer Says He Saw No Blood on Reiser's Car Seat

Filed under
Reiser

wired: A police officer testified in the Hans Reiser murder trial Tuesday he pulled over the defendant for a traffic violation nine days after the Linux programmer's wife went missing and noticed no signs the vehicle was used to dispose of a body.

Perl 5.10 for Perl's 20th birthday

Filed under
Software

oreillynet.com: Perl 1 was released to the public by Larry Wall 20 years ago today. To celebrate, Perl5Porters have released Perl5.10, the latest stable version of Perl 5. Happy Birthday Perl!

National Boards to Vote NO for OOXML at ISO

Filed under
OSS

fanaticattack.com: There will be a BRM (Ballot resolution meeting) in Geneva on 25-29 February 2008 to answer the comments by National Standard Boards on OOXML and to resolve issues.

Linux Networking Cookbook: Tasty Linux recipes

Filed under
Reviews

linux-watch: Even before I picked up Unix, I worked on networks. While networking has gotten simpler, it's almost all TCP/IP now instead of Arcnet, Token-Ring and a half dozen dusty wiring and protocol schemes. The services that use networking have gotten ever more powerful and more complicated. That's why a book like Carla Schroder's Linux Networking Cookbook is so valuable.

Ubuntu 7.10: A warm and fuzzy Linux or a slightly less geeky upgrade for early adopters?

Filed under
Ubuntu

laptopmag.com: If you’ve been curious about Linux but fearful of installing the open-source OS on a laptop, then Ubuntu 7.10 will eliminate all excuses. This graphical and very friendly version of the OS is free, looks and plays very much like Mac/Windows, and runs a surprisingly vast array of programs from the open-source community.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Creating Snort Rules with EnGarde

  • Split and Merge PDF Documents with pdfsam
  • HowTo: KDocker/AllTray - System Tray Docking (Fedora)
  • Mobile phone management under Linux
  • How to turn your spreadsheet into a database for mail merges in OpenOffice
  • How To Install KDE 4 RC 2 in Ubuntu
  • using a guardian to ensure your lamp site is always up
  • Installing Video Driver and Compiz for ATi Radeon Xpress 1100 on Ubuntu 7.10 and Fedora 8

Why Ubuntu succeeds: Shuttleworth isn't an uber-geek

Filed under
Ubuntu

Matt Asay: I really liked this InformationWeek article with Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu. I liked it in part because I think Mark is an exceptional person. But I also liked it for its insight into why Ubuntu has done so well.

Desktop Linux most popular topic of 2007

Filed under
Linux

Dana Blankenhorn: Desktop Linux became the most popular topic in open source during 2007, as evidenced by the our August post asking if Ubuntu had clinched the desktop Linux market.

Also: For 2008 expect more Linux applications

UT3 Linux server now available

Filed under
Gaming

linuxhardware.org: The Linux server is now available for download. It is built from the 1.1 patch, and is network compatible with all retail UT3 clients.

Thankfully Windows Comes Pre-Installed

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxjournal.com: Let's imagine for a moment that the world was slightly different and Windows did not come pre-installed on most computers. You get your shiny new computer and since you don't know nuttin about this Linux stuff you go and buy a copy of Windows XP (to upgrade to an older more familiar experience).

Advanced Web Statistics -- Distrowatch

abhay-techzone.blogspot: For the month of December 2007, the web statistics of Distrowatch show an interesting pattern.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Fedora + Plasma + Unity, Design Interns, and New ISO Build

  • Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks?
    Hybrid things aren't usually the best option around. Like hybrid cars, for example. Technically, when you marry concepts, you change the energy state, and while this could make sense in that you blend the best of several worlds, when this is done in a forced manner over a short period of time rather than eons of evolution, you end with the worst bits as the product of your mutation. I read about the United theme for Plasma a few months ago, and given that I've spent a fair deal of time fiddling with themes and icons and fonts and making different desktop environments look prettier than their defaults, I was intrigued. So I decided to see whether the notion of having Plasma look like Unity is a sane option. Let us.  Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks? [...] What is thy point, Vanessa, the astute among you may ask? Well, I have nothing against United or its creators, but I did come to the conclusion that too much tweaking is worse than no tweaking, if this statement makes sense. I like the notion of trying to overcome the inherent problems in each desktop through the use of themes and extensions. After all, I've been doing that profusely for the past few months. But it gets undone when you cross the desktop environment space. Making Gnome better yes. Making Plasma better, absolutely. Unity as an overlay for Plasma, well tricky. There's too much disparity for you to be able to hide the underlying workflow mechanisms and UI philosophies. Then, every little inconsistency glares. You notice things you do not expect, and you get angry because there are certain things you do expect. Some transformations work quite well because they build on the foundations, e.g. various Gnome panels or Macbuntu. But Plasma has its own special charm and flow and making it into a weird version of Unity, which itself is a weird version of Gnome misses the bigger picture. And so, if you're asking me, Plasma and Unity are two separate worlds, best enjoyed in isolation. United is an interesting notion, but it also signifies the upper limit for my own wild ideas and tweaking. Yes, you can make it work, then again, it means taking away from the beauty and style of what these two desktops do, and that's not the purpose of my pimping guides. So we shall stop here, and explore other colors and shapes. Have fun, little penguins.
  • Fedora Design Interns 2017
    Here’s an update on internships. Older post linked to here. Quick recap: there’s been 2 long-term interns for Fedora design team since February, and one short-term guy, who came for 2 weeks at the beginning of June. Guys have been doing an amazing job, I can’t stress enough how happy I am to have them around.
  • F26-20170815 Updated ISOs released

today's howtos

Security: Hardware Back Doors, Microsoft Windows, Kronos

  • Hiding malware in boobytrapped replacement screens would undetectably compromise your mobile device
     

    On the one hand, if you let an untrusted stranger install hardware in your electronic device, you're opening yourself up to all kinds of potential mischief; on the other hand, an estimated one in five smartphones has a cracked screen and the easiest, most efficient and cheapest way to get that fixed is to go to your corner repair-shop.  

  • How hackers {sic} are targeting the shipping industry [iophk: "Microsoft TCO"]
     

    Whenever one of the firm's fuel suppliers would send an email asking for payment, the virus simply changed the text of the message before it was read, adding a different bank account number.  

  • Locky ransomware is back from the dead with two new strains [iophk: "Windows TCO"]
     

    What hasn't changed, though, is the method of distribution.Rather than rifling through the trove of spilt US National Security Agency exploits, as the groups behind WannaCry and NotPetya did, Locky is distributed via phishing emails containing malicious Microsoft Office files or zipped attachments containing a malicious script.

  • Connected cars could have an airbag problem
     

    "It's not the car manufacturers' fault, and it's not a problem introduced by them. The security issue that we leveraged in our research lies in the standard that specifies how the car device network (i.e., CAN) works," added Trend.

    [...] To eliminate the risk entirely, an updated CAN standard should be proposed, adopted, and implemented. This whole process would likely require another generation of vehicles."

  • Code chunk in Kronos malware used long before MalwareTech published it
    A chunk of code found in the Kronos bank-fraud malware originated more than six years before security researcher Marcus Hutchins is accused of developing the underlying code, a fellow security researcher said Friday. The conclusion, reached in an analysis of Kronos published by security firm Malwarebytes, by no means proves or disproves federal prosecutors' allegations that Hutchins wrote Kronos code and played a role in the sale of the malware. It does, however, clarify speculation over a Tweet from January 2015, in which MalwareTech—the online handle Hutchins used—complained that a complex piece of code he had published a month earlier had been added to an unnamed malware sample without his permission.
  • Secret chips in replacement parts can completely hijack your phone’s security
    People with cracked touch screens or similar smartphone maladies have a new headache to consider: the possibility the replacement parts installed by repair shops contain secret hardware that completely hijacks the security of the device. The concern arises from research that shows how replacement screens—one put into a Huawei Nexus 6P and the other into an LG G Pad 7.0—can be used to surreptitiously log keyboard input and patterns, install malicious apps, and take pictures and e-mail them to the attacker. The booby-trapped screens also exploited operating system vulnerabilities that bypassed key security protections built into the phones. The malicious parts cost less than $10 and could easily be mass-produced. Most chilling of all, to most people, the booby-trapped parts could be indistinguishable from legitimate ones, a trait that could leave many service technicians unaware of the maliciousness. There would be no sign of tampering unless someone with a background in hardware disassembled the repaired phone and inspected it.

Ubuntu: Themes and Icons, MAAS, Podcast and More

  • Some interesting Ubuntu themes and icons
    Well, I guess there isn't much to say. If you like the stock looks, ignore this article. If you find the defaults not colorful or fun enough, or you just plain like tweaking, then you might want to consider some of the stuff I've outlined here. My taste is subjective, of course, but then, I aim for simple, clean designs and pleasing art work. Overall, you have a plenty of good options here. More icons than themes. Vimix or Arc seem like neat choices for the latter, and among the sea of icons, Moka, Numix and Uniform seem to do a great job. And of course, Macbuntu. I wish there were more monochrome or accented icons, but that's something I still haven't found. Anyhow, I hope you like this silly little piece. If you have suggestions, please send them, just remember my aesthetics criteria - simplicity of installation, clean lines, no gradients, no bugs. That would be all for today, fellas.
  • 7 of the Best Icon Themes for Ubuntu
    On a hunt to find the best icon themes for Ubuntu? Well, you’ve come to the right post place! In this post we will show you some of the best icon themes for Ubuntu, ranging from modern, flat icon sets, to a circular icon pack carrying a colourful twist. Oh, and as this article is constantly updated you don’t need to fret about any of the links or information being out of date. Feel free to bookmark this list for future reference, or share it on social media.
  • MAAS Development Summary – August 18th, 2017
  • S10E24 – Fierce Hurried Start
  • conjure-up dev summary: aws native integration, vsphere <3, and ADDONS