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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 17 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Open Access Schism: Recapitulating Open Source? Rianne Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 11:01am
Story Switch to Linux part 2 – install Linux Rianne Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 10:58am
Story Backtrack 5 R3 Hits One Million Downloads on Softpedia Roy Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 10:56am
Story GNOME 3.14 Beta 2 Has Been Released! Rianne Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 10:52am
Story Toshiba introduces a Chromebook you would crave to buy Roy Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 10:47am
Story Chromebooks will make the year of Linux possible: Linus Torvalds Roy Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 10:41am
Story Earning a living from open source software Roy Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 10:27am
Story Matthew Miller: The Remaking of Fedora 1, 2, 3 Roy Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 7:31am
Story Boycott Systemd, Messy Makulu, and Top Ten Rianne Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 7:28am
Story The Linux Setup - Stefano Zacchiroli, Former Debian Project Leader Rianne Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 7:25am

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to number each line in a text file on Linux

  • How to enable the universe and multiverse repositories in Ubuntu 8.04
  • How do I… Connect an Apple iPod to an Ubuntu Linux PC?
  • Install the linux mint menu in ubuntu hardy
  • How to change the hostname of a Linux system
  • zypper on opensuse
  • Run-levels: Create, use, modify, and master
  • Manage Ogg audio streams with OGMtools

Why do Open-Licensed drivers matter?

Filed under
OSS

zerias.blogspot: One of the more common questions to be found in open-licensed software today is why do open drivers matter? The theological and emotional factors of Open-Licensed software that drive many of the concerns today are simply lost on the average computer user. There need to be tangible benefits.

Tracking Kernel Oops

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "The http://www.kerneloops.org website collects kernel oops and warning reports from various mailing lists and bugzillas as well as with a client users can install to auto-submit oopses," began Arjan van de Ven, referring to a website first announced last December.

Three German KDE Deployments

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The IT Service Center Berlin has announced the development of a desktop system for the public services in Germany's capital. This is yet another public body making the switch to the Free Desktop system.

Alternative distros: Puppy Linux and antiX

Filed under
Linux

Josh Saddler: I'm in search of a lightweight distro for an ancient 1ghz, 128MB RAM laptop. One of these days, I'll find a distro that properly supports ACPI and VGA-out. I hope. Now, I'll sum up my impressions of Puppy Linux and antiX.

Flock 2.0 Based on Firefox 3 - Beta Coming Soon

Filed under
Moz/FF

cybernetnews.com: Mozilla is hard at work getting ready for the launch of Firefox 3, and another Release Candidate is scheduled to be available tomorrow. The Flock team is working equally as hard to make sure that they update their browser with all of the Firefox 3 goodness as soon as possible.

Urban Terror FPS is as realistic as today's headlines

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: Over the past two years, I've reviewed free software first-person shooters including Tremulous, Alien Arena, and Nexuiz -- all top-notch games. Now we can add Urban Terror to that list. While the first three sport other-worldly, sci-fi-style opponents, Urban Terror goes for realistic opponents -- as realistic as today's headlines.

Biedronka offers low cost Kubuntu based laptop

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Hardware
Moz/FF
OOo
GIMP

Biedronka, which is roughly the Polish equivaent to Wal-mart, is offering a laptop with Kubuntu pre-installed for only 999 PLN.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 - 1-Year End Of Life Notice

Filed under
Linux

redhat.com: In accordance with the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Errata Support Policy, the
7 year life-cycle of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 will end on May 31, 2009.

Review: A new all-in-one server

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computerworld.com: Almost exactly seven years ago, I reviewed four different "All-in-One" Internet appliances that included file, e-mail and Web servers and some other workgroup type utilities. Jumping into the fray is a new product from a fairly young company near Vancouver called Sutus. Sutus avoids security issues by using a hardened version of Gentoo Linux.

A Quick Look At Facebook's Open Source

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com/blog: The other week, when representatives from Facebook mentioned that they'd be open-sourcing significant portions of their platform, I hazarded a guess that they would be providing at most a set of APIs. Now that Facebook's actually released some code under the aegis of the Facebook Open Platform, I had a look-see.

Canonical Releases Ubuntu for Netbooks

Filed under
Ubuntu

practical-tech.com: The paint has barely dried on Ubuntu 8.04 when Canonical announced at the Computex trade show in Taiwan on June 3rd that it will be releasing a new version of Ubuntu 8.04 just for Intel Atom-based netbooks and UMPCs (Ultra Mobile PCs).

Upgrading to Slackware 12.1

Filed under
Slack

linux.com: Pat Volkerding and the Slackware team released the latest version of Slackware Linux, 12.1, on May 2. Even though it is a "point one" release, the list of new features reads like what other distributions would consider a major new version.

Linux Podcasts Roundup

Filed under
Linux

crunchbang.org: I have been working pretty hard lately, mainly coding some personal projects. I always used to listen to music whilst coding, these days I tend to listen to podcasts. Is that sad? Maybe, maybe not. Either way, I thought I would post a list of Linux and Ubuntu related podcasts which I listen to on a regular basis.

Linux: You Get What You Paid For (When You Bought Windows)

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: If you've been an Open Source advocate for any significant amount of time, you've no doubt heard someone say, with a sneer in their voice, "You get what you pay for". Let it be noted, I really hate that cliche.

openSUSE 11: Ubuntu Killer?

Filed under
SUSE

junauza.com: I have been an avid openSUSE user in the past as it worked perfectly on my main workstation. However, I switched to Xubuntu as I'm more obsessed with speed and simplicity nowadays more than anything else.

Ubuntu Server receives positive reviews

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.techtarget.com: Ubuntu isn’t just for desktops. Behind the scenes, corporate IT managers have put Ubuntu to work on servers. Don’t believe me? Well, I can name names. I can also tell you up front that Ubuntu Server gets high marks for its corporate support; easy backups, installs and upgrades; documentation, and more.

OpenSUSE 11 RC1: The Mercedes-Benz to Ubuntu’s Volkswagen

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.zdnet.com: 2008 will be a very good vintage for community end-user Linux distributions. I must admit, however, to having a particularly strong interest in OpenSUSE, Novell’s entry into the community Linux distro fray.

Five things I hate about Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.ittoolbox: You all know that I am an advocate of Linux. I have even been called a fan boy and a Linux shill. That's fine. People can call me what they want. However there are some things about Linux that add a few extra lines to the forehead. Here are the five things I most hate about Linux.

Open Source Software Shows Its Muscle

Filed under
OSS

law.com: Two recent events should give for-profit companies new reasons to re-evaluate the ways in which they use open source software as well as the extent to which they use it.

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