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Thursday, 23 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Changes in Ubuntu releases srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 5:28pm
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 5:12pm
Story Trisquel 6.0 Review: High performing and elegant srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 1:35am
Story Python Settles Trademark Dispute srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 1:18am
Story Simple QML vs EFL comparison srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 1:15am
Story Computers almost self-aware, scientist says srlinuxx 19/03/2013 - 10:21pm
Story 10 things to do after installing openSUSE 12.3 srlinuxx 19/03/2013 - 10:19pm
Story Everyday Linux User Review of SLAX srlinuxx 19/03/2013 - 10:16pm
Story Ubuntu, openSUSE and the Definition of Easy srlinuxx 19/03/2013 - 8:06pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 19/03/2013 - 5:30pm

Software Freedom Law Center to Host Legal Summit

Filed under
OSS

linux-watch: A few years ago, the idea that savvy developers and IT professionals would need to know anything about intellectual property law would have been dismissed as a bad joke. Then along came SCO.

GNOME Online Desktop: Achieving what was done over a decade ago?

Filed under
Software

pinderkent.blogsavy: Those who follow GNOME have probably read about the GNOME Online Desktop. After reading about this concept, I find myself very confused at what it is they’re actually trying to accomplish.

Do we still need LUGs?

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: In the world of Linux, many things have changed in the last decade. The operating system itself has grown up, and is no longer an "upstart." But one mainstay of the Linux community, the Linux user group (LUG), appears to be on the decline in some areas. Attendance is down, LUG presidents say, and some groups have stopped meeting. Does this mean we don't need LUGs anymore?

Linspire preps impending software updates

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: It's a bit later than Linspire had planned, but the company's CEO Kevin Carmony told DesktopLinux that the new commercial version of its Linux distribution, Linspire 6.0, along with the free version, Freespire 2.0, and its revised CNR (click-and-run) software update system, should be out before August.

Opera 9.22 Available with Improved BitTorrent Support

Filed under
Software

CyberNetNews: The Opera team has been working intensely on version 9.5, and we’ll hopefully be seeing weekly builds of those coming shortly. In the meantime they have whipped up Opera 9.22 which has significant improvements to the BitTorrent downloader.

NVIDIA GeForce 8: Linux vs. Windows

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: When it comes to binary display drivers under Linux, NVIDIA is generally known as the company that's able to offer drivers that are on par with their Windows driver. In this article, we have additional information on these austere performance problems along with benchmarks showing the frame-rate differences between Windows XP and Linux.

An interview with Matthew Szulik: The culture of Red Hat, the power of open source

Filed under
Interviews

Matt Asay: I spent an hour with Matthew Szulik this morning, wanting to get his input on the Open Source CEO Series. Matthew isn't the sort of person to seek the limelight for himself, so it was actually hard to convince him to answer questions.

Automatix can break your Linux Ubuntu Install

Filed under
Ubuntu

pimp your linux: Automatix is a program that installs a myriad programs on Linux distributions. It’s quite useful for people that are fed up with the limited options in the regular Ubuntu package manager. However, as helpful as the program may seem, there exists a problematic side to Automatix.

Newbie flunks Firefox update

Filed under
Moz/FF

desktoplinux: OK, Desktop Linux heads, I'm a confessed newbie trying to switch to Linux from XP. My simplyMEPIS install from an ISO went well, but now, on day two, my attempts to install the just-released Firefox update have failed.

Are There Really Too Many Linux Distros?

Filed under
Linux

informationweek blogs: How are Linux distributions like digital cameras? It sounds like a joke on the order of, "What’s the difference between a compulsive gambler and a revolving door?" (Answer: The revolving door knows when to stop.) But the more I’ve thought about it, the more I’ve realized that Linux distros are as varied as digital cameras, and for some of the same reasons.

Gartner, Open Source, and Microsoft

Filed under
OSS

intelligententerprise.com: I received Gartner e-mail this week marketing their up-coming open-source summit. The message contains gems that illuminate Gartner's perspective on open source and the larger IT world.

Removing KDE icons in gnome / remove gnome icons in KDE

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntu tutorials: This tutorial is for those people that like to run gnome and KDE side by side. This will allow you to only show the native apps in the menus within each desktop environment instead of showing everything.

Linux... Up Against the Wall

Filed under
Linux

Brian Proffitt: Across from me is the man who invented that monitor and the content delivery system that runs it, Eric Kanagy, CEO of RedPost, Inc. I have traveled all of 40 minutes to Goshen, Indiana to meet Eric and find out what's the big deal about an electronic bulletin board that runs Linux.

Amarok and Digikam ports for KDE 4

Filed under
KDE

liquidat: KDE 4 is coming closer, and the 3rd party programs are busy porting. Amarok now unveiled that they will reuse some Plasma techniques to create appealing effects while Digikam reported a first version running on KDE 4.

Sabayon Linux 1.0 Business Edition Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: Sabayon Linux has released a "business edition" of its popular LiveDVD distribution known for its use of desktop accelerated effects and being based upon Gentoo. Sabayon Linux 1.0 Business Edition ships without the eye candy and games and is for when art meets business.

Linux: KVM Adds Support For SMP Guests

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: A recently merged KVM patchset included support for guest SMP, various performance improvements, and suspend/resume fixes. KVM stands for Kernel-based Virtual Machine, "a full virtualization solution for Linux on x86 hardware containing virtualization extensions".

Open-source Democracy Player relaunches as Miro

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: The Participatory Culture Foundation (PCF) has renamed and relaunched its open-source television platform in hopes of offering an "open, mass medium of online television." What was once known as Democracy Player is now Miro.

Avogadro Gets Some Sweet POVRay Goodness

Filed under
KDE

blog.cryos.net: It has been a while since I last posted about progress with Avogadro. I have been doing a lot of under the hood improvements which has been really frustrating at times and hard to blog about. At last I have some real output and have just committed the code to the repository.

KDE hacker authors Qt book

Filed under
Misc

linuxdevices: Core KDE developer Daniel Molkentin has written a book about Trolltech's cross-platform application development toolkit. Published by NoStarch Press, and entitled, "The Book of Qt 4."

Review: Puppy Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Raiden's Realm: Puppy Linux is a light weight Linux distribution built from scratch and born in mid 2002. It’s creator, Barry Kauler, originally created Puppy Linux as a fun project to do in his spare time. But recent tension in the community have spawned some heated controversy of late.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017