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About Tux Machines

Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Joys of Open Source Software srlinuxx 16/03/2011 - 1:14am
Story Ok, I’m committed now srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 11:01pm
Story Fedora 14 srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 10:58pm
Story Five Great Games for Linux srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 10:57pm
Story What does Community really mean? (Part 1) srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 8:53pm
Story Speedy 'Wonder Patch' Debuts in New Linux Kernel srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 8:51pm
Story Ubuntu Core going after embedded Linux srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 6:47pm
Story OpenSUSE 11.4 Review srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 6:44pm
Story Does Mozilla Have a Speed Problem? srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 6:42pm
Story 59 Open Source Tools That Can Replace Popular Security Software srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 6:39pm

Running Internet Explorer in Debian and ubuntu Linux

No clicks needed. No boring setup processes. No Wine complications. Just one easy script and you’ll get three IE versions to test your Sites. And it’s free and open source.This may be very helpful for software developers and web developers to test their applications.

Read Full article here

Myah OS 2.3rc1 Release

Filed under
Linux

Myah OS 2.3rc1 is now availble for download. I know it's only been a week or 2 since 2.2 came out but I have been working day and night making impovements. So now Myah OS has the latest KDE 3.5.4 with all the propper support.

Opposition to new Linux licence mounts

Filed under
OSS

Opposition to a new version of the licence for open source OS Linux is growing, with a number of prominent developers joining originator Linus Torvalds in criticising changes in wording.

A concise guide to installing and using FreeDOS ver 1.0 in GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

I have always looked at the DOS operating system with some nostalgia. FreeDOS is a project which aims to recreate the magic of DOS. Since I have been using Linux as my operating system, I decided to install and use FreeDOS inside Linux by means of an emulator.

Oracle sticks with open source Berkeley license

Filed under
Software

Claiming that, from an open source standpoint, things haven't changed with its recently acquired Berkeley open source embedded database, Oracle Corp is now releasing its next version under the same licenses.

Novell Offers Tech Support for Virtualized Red Hat Linux--Sort Of

Filed under
SUSE

In the commercial Linux distribution racket, the only way to make money is to charge for installation and technical support and other services, such as systems integration or custom modifications. This week, at the Virtualization Executive Forum in New York, Novell said that it would offer technical support on RHEL 4 when it ran within Xen.

Free Agent: The Latest Free Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Freespire is the new, cost-free alternative from Linspire. How well does it compete with the likes of Ubuntu's Dapper Drake?

Backup Your MySQL Database with phpMyAdmin

Filed under
HowTos

One of the most important tasks for a webmaster is to keep a current backup of your database or databases. If you are a small website or the database is low priority, you might just perform the backup manually. One easy way to manually backup your database is to use the backup feature of a database management application such as the open source, freeware program called phpMyAdmin.

Securing NFS - Tunneling NFS over SSH

Filed under
HowTos

The goal of this howto is building an NFS server that works on an SSH tunnel. This way all traffic between your hosts and the file server is encrypted and thus more secure. Normally you should enter a password every time you try to establish an SSH connection but since we could be mounting at bootup we will use ssh-keygen to create a keypair so we can login without entering a password. We will, however, limit that login session to executing just one command.

Open-source guru Eric Raymond joins Freespire board

In a move that some may have sensed was coming, Eric S. Raymond -- one of the co-founders of the open-source movement -- will become the newest member of the Freespire Leadership Board on Sept. 27.

Gaël Duval, Ulteo, & Screenshot

Filed under
MDV

LXF 85 is available at the newsstands since Sep. 21 (in Britain), and it was sent to subscribers about one week earlier. Something new is publicly known to the readers of LXF, and absolutely n-o-b-o-d-y said a word on it! The Ulteo coverage starts with two pages of babbling. Then...

Book Review: Moving to Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Reviews

This is the fourth book by Gagné I've reviewed over the past half-dozen years. Though I've found things to carp at in each of them, each one was a first-rate book. Here's another.

Ubuntu - the best Linux distribution?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu has a lot going for it. A rich benefactor cum space tourist, a huge and rapidly growing user base, a sleek look and an easy install. So why is it the best in Linux operating systems? Simply put, it’s not. That’s right, Ubuntu is not the best Linux distro.

Linux: 2.6.16.y, Defining Stable

Filed under
Linux

In August 2006 Adrian Bunk took over maintainership of the 2.6.16.y stable kernel. With the release of the 2.6.16.30-pre1 patch, concerns were expressed as to what makes a stable tree.

FSF Clarifies 'Inaccurate' Information About GPLv3

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation has moved to clarify what it says is inaccurate information being presented about the second discussion draft of the next version of the GNU General Public License.

Open-source developer's wife still missing, reward offered

Filed under
Reiser

Nina Reiser, the estranged wife of well-known open-source programmer Hans Reiser, is still missing and a $15,000 reward for information about her is now being offered by the Oakland, Calif. police department.

Review: Mesk Audio Player 0.2.1

Filed under
Reviews

There are numerous audio players designed especially for GNOME. Single GnomeFiles repository lists over 60 of them. However, the problem lays in quality rather than quantity. Recently I’ve been looking for an audio player that would resemble the famous Windows player called Foobar 2000. I have found a lot of clones, and just a few original applications. Mesk audio player was among the latter.

Your TV Guide under Linux!

Filed under
HowTos

What do most people have in common? They watch TV! In fact, if you're like most people you probably watch TV a lot. For this you need a pleasant and effective way to know in advance what's on TV, at what time and on which channel.

Mozilla Releases Firefox 2.0 RC1

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Corp. will unveil a release candidate of Firefox 2.0 later Tuesday, the next step toward finalizing the browser's first major upgrade in a year.

Unix To Surpass Linux?

Filed under
OS

Tom Yager dusted off his crystal ball this morning in order to answer the question "where will Linux thrive?" He also made a prediction regarding the effect of Apple's Unix on the future of Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

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  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.

Development News

  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings
    U.K.-based technology analyst firm RedMonk just released the latest version of its biannual rankings of programming languages, and once again JavaScript tops the list, followed by Java and PHP. Those are same three languages that topped RedMonk’s list in January. In fact, the entire top 10 remains the same as it was it was six months ago. Perhaps the biggest surprise in Redmonk’s list—compiling the “performance of programming languages relative to one another on GitHub and Stack Overflow”—is that there are so few surprises, at least in the top 10.
  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest
    It's no surprise that C and Java share the top two spots in the IEEE Spectrum's latest Interactive Top Programming Languages survey, but R at number five? That's a surprise. This month's raking from TIOBE put Java at number one and C at number two, while the IEEE reverses those two, and the IEEE doesn't rank assembly as a top-ten language like TIOBE does. It's worth noting however that the IEEE's sources are extremely diverse: the index comprises search results from Google, Twitter, GitHub, StackOverflow, Reddit, Hacker News, CareerBuilder, Dice, and the institute's own eXplore Digital Library. Even then, there are some oddities in the 48 programming environments assessed: several commenters to the index have already remarked that “Arduino” shouldn't be considered a language, because code for the teeny breadboard is written in C or C++.