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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Debian & APT - Why I love it

Filed under
Software

itpro.co.uk/blogs: I pretty much use Debian in favour of other linuxes because it is free, and updates are also free. Why do I personally use Debian on my home servers - the main answer is APT.

Five fun ways to use a Linux webcam

Filed under
Hardware

linux.com: So you just set up a Linux-compatible webcam. You've tested it with Kopete, and you can send images on MSN and Yahoo! Now what? Here are some fun things you can try.

Also: Get the most out of your mouse with btnx

The world ends on January 19, 2038: thanks Unix!

Filed under
Linux

linuxlove.org: While no significant computer failures occurred when the clocks rolled over into 2000, this might not be the case with the Y2K38 bug. Even if this problem only affects Unix-like operating systems, if true, will be enough to cause massive disruption to the computer world and real world alike, as we know them.

How to Create a Desktop Linux Monopoly

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement.earthweb: What if I told you that it would actually be possible to see a Linux monopoly with the right components in place taking form within a short five-year period? That would be impossible due to licensing and availability, right? Nonsense.

Eight Distros a Week: Fluxbuntu 7.10

Filed under
Linux

larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress: Take the massively popular and versatile Ubuntu distro and minimize the impact on system resources so newer machines are raised to a higher level of performance while older machines can utilize it. What would you call it? Fluxbuntu.

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Opensuse 11: Alpha 2 with KDE 4

  • Spice up your Linux desktop with AWN
  • UPDATE: OpenSUSE 10.3 And KDE 4 Repositories
  • Accessing Linux Volumes From Windows

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Patch Running Linux Kernel

  • Open OpenOffice Text Files That Are Larger Than 65,536
  • Unite Windows and Linux With a Single Mouse Click
  • Slash Proc - File System Utilities
  • Debian Lenny and compiz fusion
  • Making your internet faster (ubuntu)
  • Ubuntu: How to View Hidden Files and Folders
  • How to make Windows Vista boot first using GRUB in Ubuntu
  • Tips on removing the annoying Ubuntu cdrom needed action in apt-get

Interview with Nokia's Olli Toivanen

Filed under
Interviews

weblog.infoworld.com: I managed to score an email interview with Olli Toivainen, Nokia's director of product management and one of the key guys behind the N Series of Linux-based Internet Tablets.

What to Use in Linux: Open Or Closed Software?

Filed under
OSS

osweekly.com: This is a question that has struck a lot of new Linux users. Should they use closed source software when the open source alternatives are lacking? Today, I will talk about some of the applications I use and the advantages that each of them present.

Open source on campus: The Stanford Open Source Lab

Filed under
OSS

redhatmagazine.com: Over the last few months, open source has gained momentum at Stanford University in the form of the Stanford Open Source Lab. Inspired by groups like the Free Software Foundation, Oregon State University’s Open Source Lab, Drupal, Openflows Community Technology Lab, and MIT’s Open Course Ware, a few people at Stanford decided to band together and dedicate their time and energies to the development of free/open/libre learning and knowledge resources.

A Look Back at 10 Years of OSI

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

onlamp.com: During February 1998, Eric Raymond and Bruce Perens founded OSI, the Open Source Initiative, with the goal of promoting Open Source culture, especially in the business world. After 10 years of activity, the foundation has reached many unbelieveable goals, and it has a great future ahead. To celebrate the moment, Federico Biancuzzi interviewed the two founders, Bruce Perens and Eric Raymond.

PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniMe - Dual Review

Filed under
PCLOS

candyfoss.com: One of the things Carl and I toyed with when discussing CandyFOSS is doing dual-reviews — where we both review the distribution at the same time. Today we’re taking a look at PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniMe, the latest and greatest from the PCLinuxOS guys, just minimalised so you only get what you need and you add what you want on top of it.

This new job really makes me think... Windows vs Linux

Filed under
OS

androodle.blogspot: I use linux at school and at my job at MSUM and it works wonderfully, but I think it's still lacking the desktop features it really requires to be a fully functional OS for the consumer market.

Why I use GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux

silentcoder.co.za: With this post I wish to answer the apparent belief that GNU/linux doesn’t “work”. I want to highlight the practical advantages it offers to me as an end-user (I may be a developer, but I also use my computer - and so does everybody else) - advantages which I have come to consider crucial.

First look: Haiku poetically resurrects BeOS

Filed under
OS

arstechnica.com: At the Southern California Linux Expo this past weekend, Google engineer and open-source software developer Bruno de Albuquerque gave a presentation about Haiku, a project devoted to creating an open-source clone of BeOS.

Fedora 8: Live CD Reviewed

Filed under
Linux

osweekly.com: Earlier this week, I took a close look at the latest release of Fedora. Overall, Fedora 8 is a really solid distro. But there were specific areas that a lot of other reviews completely missed. In this piece, we will examine these more intimately to get a better understanding of Red Hat's new release.

Laptops For Less: 25 Notebooks Under $600

Filed under
Hardware

informationweek.com: With portables supposedly outselling desktop PCs last year, obviously someone considers them an intriguing proposition. To be honest, once you realize that you can take it with you -- good or bad as that might be to your personal life -- it's easy to understand the attraction. Our handy guide to the best and latest low-cost notebook computers.

The little laptop that could -- do just about anything the big boys can

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

canada.com: I've never been terribly cutting edge when it comes to my own personal electronics. But the little laptop computer I bought recently turned heads at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas last month.

Linux Got Game: Alien Arena 2007 Review

Filed under
Gaming

junauza.blogspot: Alien Arena 2007 is a free/open-source first-person shooter game based on source code released by id Software. The game combines a 1950s-era sci-fi atmosphere with gameplay similar to the Quake, Doom, and Unreal Tournament series. Alien Arena is primarily an online multiplayer action game, although single player campaigns are also available against bots.

SAM Linux Desktop shows promise

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: SAM Linux Desktop, an Xfce-fronted distribution based on PCLinuxOS, aims to be a complete and modern desktop operating system. Though it has problems that need to be worked out before it will match the competition, it offers an easy install, a 3-D desktop environment, and a flurry of programs to suit your needs.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.