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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

$190 Puppy Linux Movie Player for the Minivan

Filed under
Hardware

What I wanted for the van was the equivalent of what we had already working at home, MythTV running on a $300 Linux box. For $190 I had a diskless, fanless, completely silent PC with a Via processor and 128 megs of RAM. To this I added a copy of Puppy Linux.

Ballmer: Linux Users Owe Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

In comments confirming the open-source community's suspicions, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Thursday declared his belief that the Linux operating system infringes on Microsoft's intellectual property.

A closer look at Oracle's support and indemnification offerings for Linux

Filed under
Linux

I had a few minutes to burn today, so I did what I'm sure you were doing: I read the Oracle Enterprise Linux Services Agreement. It's funny what you find when you start digging around in the legalese that governs the Big Announcement that Oracle made. It makes "Unbreakable Linux" look, well, a little flimsy.

Major vendors put open source into turmoil

Filed under
OSS

Major software vendors are shaking up the open-source market. Microsoft Corp.'s deal with Novell Inc. and Oracle Corp.'s move to support Red Hat Linux have sent IT investors scurrying to figure out what it all means.

Bring back deleted files with lsof

Filed under
HowTos

There you are, happily playing around with an audio file you've spent all afternoon tweaking, and you're thinking, "Wow, doesn't it sound great? Lemme just move it over here." At that point your subconscious chimes in, "Um, you meant mv, not rm, right?" Oops. I feel your pain -- this happens to everyone. But there's a straightforward method to recover your lost file, and since it works on every standard Linux system, everyone ought to know how to do it.

Getting Cute with the GPL

Filed under
OSS

Eben Moglen has now stated that GPLv3 will be redrafted to include clear language that will make the Novell-Microsoft agreement an obvious GPL violation, and more.

Restrict the use of su command

Filed under
HowTos

su is used to become another user during a login session. Invoked without a username, su defaults to becoming the super user. By default almost all distro allows to use su command. However you can restrict the use of su command for security reasons.

Also: Howto prevent non-root users from logging into the system

The Thing About Beagle

Filed under
Software

Beagle is a desktop search tool for Gnome. I thought I might give it a go, because sometimes I need to find things. Since I am using KDE I also installed Kerry, which is a KDE front end for Beagle.

Using Apache Derby databases, Part 2: Manage IT services beyond mere deployment

Filed under
News

In this article, find out how IBM autonomic computing technology, particularly the IBM Autonomic Integrated Development Environment (AIDE) toolkit, may be an effective solution. Learn how you can use this technology with Apache Derby

Review of Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy Eft

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Most Linux users have heard of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution and many know how stable the OS is on desktop computers. But for the growing Linux laptop user segment, how well does the latest version of Ubuntu recognize specialized laptop hardware and perform on their portable device? Today I'm taking a look at Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy Eft on Open Addict's DELL XPS M170 test laptop.

FSF praises Sun's commitment to OSS

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) announced yesterday that they welcomed the public commitment from Sun Microsystems to distribute its proprietary Java platform under the GNU General Public Licence (GPL).

Ensuring network interfaces remain named consistently

Filed under
HowTos

If you have more than one network card, there is no guarantee that eth0 when you first boot up remains eth0 in the next boot. It could swap with eth1. This can happen especially if the cards are the same chipset, I reckon. If you change kernels or switch to using something like hotplug or udev you can also find the same problem.

LinuxBIOS - A truly GPLed Free Software BIOS

Filed under
Software

A BIOS is an acronym for Basic Input Output System and is the starting point of the boot process in your computer. But one of the disadvantages of the proprietary BIOS which are embedded in most PCs is that there is a good amount of code which is used in it to support legacy operating systems such as DOS and the end result is a longer time taken to boot up and pass the control to the resident operating system.

PS3 Linux: Dual Boot Instructions & Blu-ray disc mounting supported!

Filed under
HowTos

A day after the PS3 Japan launch madness, all of us here at QJ had a chance to look back and see exactly what info we had missed. I had the responsibility of checking out the Linux side of things. And while the article which I wrote yesterday was pretty much spot on, there's a few more things which I could get out of the documents released.

Installing From Tarballs

Filed under
HowTos

We usually download linux programs through package handling tools such as yum and apt-get. Download programs through package handling tools is easy, but not all programs is available in your Linux distribution repository. Sometimes, we need to download the source code, compile and install manually.

Control is the real open source advantage

Filed under
OSS

In all the blah-de-blah over the moves by Oracle and Microsoft into open source a very important point is missing, namely the motivation of enterprises in moving toward open source. It's not the cost savings. It's not the community. It's not the name of the vendor.

Mapping the universe with open source software

Filed under
Software

Astronomers at New York City's Hayden Planetarium and Rose Center for Earth and Space think space exploration should be easily accessible to anyone. To make that possible, they offer an interactive atlas of the universe that anyone can download for free.

Microsoft's Interoperability Trust Problem

Filed under
Microsoft

Yesterday, Jason Matusow, Microsoft's director of corporate standards, blogged about trust. Surprise. Surprise. He found that some customers question Microsoft's sincerity around interoperability and licensing.

Recover from CHMOD -R 777

Filed under
HowTos

A linux administrator asked a question on how to recover from CHMODing the whole file system to 777. I had also screwed my system the same way two days earlier and no solution was insight (#chmod -R 777 / ) and my Boss was angry. A solution submitted blew me off. Very simple but it worked like magic!

Simple Package management with Synaptic Package Manager in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Synaptic is a graphical user interface (GUI) for managing software packages on Debian-based distributions. If you are using Debian or Ubuntu you will easily find Synaptic in the System Tools menu or in the Administration menu. Now we will see how to add repositories,install,remove and update software packages.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux at 25: How Linux changed the world

I walked into an apartment in Boston on a sunny day in June 1995. It was small and bohemian, with the normal detritus a pair of young men would scatter here and there. On the kitchen table was a 15-inch CRT display married to a fat, coverless PC case sitting on its side, network cables streaking back to a hub in the living room. The screen displayed a mess of data, the contents of some logfile, and sitting at the bottom was a Bash root prompt decorated in red and blue, the cursor blinking lazily. I was no stranger to Unix, having spent plenty of time on commercial Unix systems like OSF/1, HP-UX, SunOS, and the newly christened Sun Solaris. But this was different. Read more

Linux Kernel News and Microsoft Breaks PowerShell

  • Coherent Accelerators, FPGAs, and PLD Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    It has been more than a decade since CPU core clock frequencies stopped doubling every 18 months, which has shifted the search for performance from the "hardware free lunch" to concurrency and, more recently, hardware accelerators. Beyond accelerating computational offload, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and programmable logic devices (PLDs) have long been used in the embedded space to provide ways to offload I/O or to implement timing-sensitive algorithms as close as possible to the pin.
  • Linux's brilliant career, in pictures
    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.
  • Quarter Century of Innovation – aka Happy Birthday Linux!
    Happy birthday Linux. You’ve defined how we should be using and adoption technology. You’ve disrupted and continue to disrupt, industries all over the place. You’ve helped define what it means to share ideas openly and freely. You’ve shown what happens when we collaborate and work together. Free and Open Source is a win-win for all and Linux is the Gold Standard of that.
  • Microsoft Open Source Czar Takes Spotlight at LinuxCon [Ed: Microsoft paid for this]
  • Windows Update borks PowerShell – Microsoft won't fix it for a week
    You'd be forgiven for thinking Microsoft is actively trying to stop people using Windows 10 Anniversary Edition. A patch this week broke one of the key features of the OS: PowerShell.

Android Leftovers

  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 unveiled in China, priced at $135
    Xiaomi took the wraps off their latest smartphone offering, the Redmi Note 4, earlier today, and as is expected from the budget-friendly Redmi series, the device offers a premium look, specifications, and features, and more importantly, an ultra-affordable price tag. The Redmi Note 4 retains the premium full metal unibody construction that was introduced with its predecessor, but now comes with a brushed metal finish and chamfered edges that looks and feels even better. The design language is quite similar as well, with the Redmi Note 4 also coming with a fingerprint scanner on the back. Under the hood, the Redmi Note 4 comes with a 5.5-inch Full HD display that is covered with a 2.5D curved glass panel. The phone is powered by a MediaTek Helio X20 processor, that is backed by the Mali-T880MP4 GPU and 2 GB or 3 GB of RAM. 16 GB or 64 GB are the on-board storage options available, which also dictates how much RAM you get, and you also get expandable storage via microSD card to cover all your needs. Keeping everything running is a huge 4,100 mAh battery.
  • New study finds iPhones fail far more often than Android phones
    Apple customers are generally a shockingly loyal bunch. The company’s high repeat customer rate can be attributed to a combination of factors that concern iPhones themselves as well as Apple’s industry-leading customer service. Dealing with Apple’s customer care department has always been a pleasure compared to dealing with rival companies, and iPhones themselves have historically been very reliable, offering a consistently smooth user experience that people love.
  • Relax, Spire can now connect to Android phones
    Spire, the wearable that promises to help you with healthy breathing and mindfulness, was previously only available for iOS devices. But that should change with an update rolling out now.
  • Android 7.0 Nougat: Small changes that make a big difference in UX
    The seventh iteration of Android (Nougat) has finally been released by the mighty Google. If you happen to be the owner of a Nexus device, you might see this update very soon. Everyone else...you know the drill. So after an extended period of waiting for the update to trickle through your carrier and onto your device, what can you expect to happen to your Android device once its center has become a creamier shade of Nougat?
  • Two Nokia Android smartphones show up in benchmark
    Nokia is definitely coming out with a few Android smartphones later this year, but today's Nokia has little in common with the company that ruled the mobile phone industry for years. For starters, the devices that will be released this year, or the next, will be made by a third-party company. Nokia won't be manufacturing phones anymore and most likely it won't manage the way they are sold through retailers and authorized resellers.
  • Proxima bae, Instagram scams, Android goes full crypto: ICYMI
  • PayPal adds proper Nexus Imprint fingerprint login support on Android
  • Google Duo has been downloaded 5 million times on Android since its release

Comparison of the Samsung Z1 vs Z2 vs Z3 Tizen smartphones

Compare Samsung Z1, Z2, and Z3 Tizen Smartphones Lets do a quick history lesson: The first Tizen Smartphone was the Samsung Z1, then came the Z3, and yesterday was the turn of the 4G touting Z2 to take centre stage. On the whole the Z2 is very similar to the Z1 and can be thought of a Z1 2016 edition with the inclusion of 4G cellular connectivity and updated software with user requested features. Read more