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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story From Laptop to Legion - Turning One Computer Into Many srlinuxx 17/05/2012 - 2:52am
Blog entry Lost mime types under kde gfranken 17/05/2012 - 2:26am
Story NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680: Windows 7 vs. Ubuntu 12.04 Linux srlinuxx 16/05/2012 - 10:42pm
Story Ubuntu Zombies srlinuxx 16/05/2012 - 10:40pm
Story One in a million srlinuxx 16/05/2012 - 10:23pm
Story Top 5 Password Managers for Linux srlinuxx 16/05/2012 - 10:21pm
Story Linux at 21: A new Linux Foundation t-shirt contest srlinuxx 16/05/2012 - 5:31pm
Story Should Canonical Can Ubuntu? srlinuxx 16/05/2012 - 5:30pm
Story Whatever You Want, Miro Finds It, Gets It, Plays It srlinuxx 16/05/2012 - 5:28pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 16/05/2012 - 3:57am

Edubuntu update - it freakin’ rocks

Filed under
Ubuntu

ZDNet: So after my last Edubuntu debacle (With Feisty Fawn comes a new Edubuntu) I decided to wait until I could devote a bit of time to a proper install.

Set Gmail as Default Mail Client in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

how-to-geek: Every Geek uses Gmail… it’s pretty much required. And now you can set Gmail as the default client in Ubuntu without any extra software.

The Perfect Desktop - Mandriva 2007 Spring Free (Mandriva 2007.1)

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Mandriva 2007 Spring Free (Mandriva 2007.1) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.

GPL likely to regain Apache compatibility

Filed under
OSS

CNET: In a significant change of course, the Free Software Foundation is working to make the upcoming version 3 of the General Public License (GPL) compatible with an alternative, the Apache License.

McNealy Says Sun Evaluating OpenSolaris On GPL

Filed under
OS

LinuxWorld (IDG): Sun Microsystems is evaluating whether it should release OpenSolaris under the GNU GPL (general public license), company co-founder and chairman, Scott McNealy told reporters in Bangalore on a conference call Wednesday.

United We Stand, Divided They Linux

Filed under
Linux

sKatterBrainZ World: The recent merger news of OSDL and FSG (not to be confused with MSG), as reported by InformationWeek, doesn’t ring my bell. Why? Because almost every Linux nut I know (and I know quite a few) doesn’t care about consistency across distributions.

Ye Olde Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat Mag: So Dell decided to ship Ubuntu on the desktop. Doesn’t that bother you guys at all? Let Ubuntu take the lead in building the better horse. They’ve earned that lead, and good on them.

GlassFish shows open source at its best

Filed under
Interviews

ComputerWorld (IDG): GlassFish is the first project to spring from Sun Microsystem's decision to open source its Java programming code and Ken Drachnik, one of its chief evangelists, points to the project as a lesson in how open source spurs innovation.

Kubuntu Takes Over Georgia; Ubuntu Summit Video

Filed under
Ubuntu

kdedevelopers: Georgia is rolling out Kubuntu in all their schools. This is being done as part of a project to bring the internet to every school in Georgia. I don't have many details yet but it should become a Canonical case study soon enough.

Fix "Password required" Error When Using Unrar in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

the how-to-geek: If you’ve tried to use the built-in “Extract Here” functionality in Ubuntu’s File Roller to extract either a single or a multi-part zip or rar file and ended up with a “Password required” error, then you might just assume the files are password protected when in fact they are not.

DC Parris of LXer to Linux community member: shut up!

Filed under
Linux

Penguin Pete's: I saw this LXer thread (on Tux500) yesterday, and decided not to comment. Then I thought about it again last night, but decided not to blog it. Then I had a hard night sleeping, and this morning it popped up again. What was bothering me? Oh, yes, my conscience.

A Pig(Snort), A Moon (Lua) and one very happy developer (Bill)

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Security: About one month ago, Snort 3.0 Alpha was released for testing in the community. If you want to be on the cutting edge of intrusion detection, packet sniffing, and keeping your system safe, check out this introduction to preparing for the future of intrusion detection.

Enchanting Pictures with ImageMagick

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: Since digital still cameras hit mainstream, we’ve all become flooded with hundreds of photos. Luckily there are some free magicians available, who can answer our call for help and automate all processes causing them take minutes instead of days.

Also: Managing Photos on your Desktop Linux Installation

Gentoo's Graphical Installer is Unnecessary

Filed under
Gentoo

daniweb: Gentoo has long been a distribution aimed towards the power Linux user. With this year's first Gentoo release, 2007.0, comes an updated LiveCD featuring a completely rewritten GTK+ based installer. The bigger question is, why provide a GTK+ based installer in the first place?

Also: Ubuntu User on Installing Gentoo

KDE tip - taking screenshots

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: In GNOME, it’s really easy to take a screenshot of your system, you just hit Print Screen and a handy window pops up where you can save it. For some reason, this functionality doesn’t work with KDE out of the box, but that doesn’t mean you can’t take screenshots.

Microsoft is not the boss, we are

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

libervis.com: After celebrations over Dell announcing that it will soon be selling GNU/Linux Ubuntu desktops and laptops we are seeing a bit of an uproar after, just a week later, Microsoft announced it's partnership with Dell akin to the one it made with Novell last November.

A Day Without Open Source

Filed under
OSS

bmc blogs: I was at a conference when two techies walked into the open bar, one an open source supporter and one staunchly anti. They got into it a bit after a few drinks, and Mr. Anti commented loudly, “I wish open source would just go away! It causes more trouble than it's worth.”

Why Is Dell Buying SLES certificates from Microsoft, Not Novell?

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

Groklaw: According to sources, Dell will be selling SLES (SUSE Linux Enterprise Server) certificates, which it will obtain from Microsoft. As part of the Novell/Microsoft deal, Microsoft received 75,000 SLES licenses. From Microsoft? The Direct2Dell blog confirms that indeed Dell will buy the certificates from Microsoft, not from Novell. Why? Why not directly from Novell?

How secure are Linux, Window and Mac OS?

Filed under
Security

Masuran.org: How secure is your favorite operating system? In a time where OS fanatics battle each other on what OS is the best, security is often one of the turning points of discussion. In this article I will be comparing the vulnerabilities listed on Secunia and assessing how serious they are.

Also: What about Linux spyware?

Red Hat, red hat, RED HAT

Filed under
Linux

  • Summit 2007: The calm before the storm

  • Overheard at the Red Hat Summit
  • Xerox SA switches to Red Hat on Dell
  • Talking security with Red Hat's Mark Cox
  • Redhat securely mount remote Linux file system using SSHFS
  • Red Hat Summit 2007 opens strong
  • Red Hat Summit: "The Desktop Paradigm is Dead"
  • Red Hat CEO Dismisses Novell, Ubuntu Threats
  • Summit 2007: Day zero, blog two
  • Red Hat Summit: ...But They'll Sell a Desktop Anyway
  • Red Hat's New Global Desktop Is Ready to Run
  • Red Hat Rolls at Home And Abroad
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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?