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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A second go at Ubuntu 12.10 srlinuxx 12/11/2012 - 6:12pm
Story A world without Linux: Where would Apache, Microsoft -- even Apple be today? srlinuxx 12/11/2012 - 6:10pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 482 srlinuxx 12/11/2012 - 5:03pm
Story Debian Project News - November 12th srlinuxx 12/11/2012 - 5:02pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 12/11/2012 - 5:01pm
Story Ubuntu 12.10 review - Why so regressive? srlinuxx 11/11/2012 - 7:14pm
Story ZaReason UltraLap 430 pairs penguin power with Ultrabook form factor srlinuxx 11/11/2012 - 4:59pm
Story few leftovers: srlinuxx 10/11/2012 - 7:27pm
Story openSUSE 12.3 Reaches Another Milestone srlinuxx 10/11/2012 - 7:23pm
Story Participate in "Wheezy" BSP marathon srlinuxx 10/11/2012 - 7:19pm

Report from MTLC's 2nd Annual Open Source Summit in Boston

Filed under
OSS

Groklaw: A Groklaw member who attended last week's Second Annual Open Source Summit in Boston has written up a report for us. He describes what each panel or talk was about, so you will know which you want to listen to.

Gwenview progress

Filed under
Software

kdedevelopers.org: In case you missed it, Gwenview has moved to kdegraphics. The KDE4 port of Gwenview is more a rewrite than a port, at least from the user perspective. It's already usable in its current state.

Upgrading ALSA drivers, libraries and utilities on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

jonas.io: I have notebook with a Intel HDA soundchip, it was not fully supported by the alsa 1.0.13 drivers that came with openSuSE 10.2 and no updated RPM’s was available. so I manually had to upgrade them to 1.0.14.

Jupiter is born

Filed under
Linux

A week ago we announced our intention to pull together what we (in those ancient days), termed as “LASnix” (aka “Linux Action Show *nix”). We’ve also decided on an official name for the project, that being “Jupiter.”

Mandriva 2007 Spring on a Sony Vaio S4XP

Filed under
MDV

tuxvaio: As with the installation of SuSE 10.1, installing Mandriva 2007 was frightfully simple. All devices worked with the sole exception of the wireless functionality of the Centrino. This can be fixed by a software download or a inexpensive Linux compatible PC card wireless adapter.

GParted Live CD

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Partitioning your hard drives is rarely a fun business and oftentimes can be a real pain to do. Thankfully, it’s a lot easier than it used to be to slice up and mess around with your drive.

Weekly tip: killing processes

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine: One of the things I hate about Windows is that there is no good way to kill frozen processes. Theoretically, you type Ctrl-Alt-Delete, wait for Task Manager to pop up, and kill the process. GNU/Linux users don't have this problem. Here's how to end processes using the terminal, a few GUIs, and even a first person shooter.

PCLinuxOS & What Sets it Apart: Part I

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PCLOS

Yet Another Linux Blog: I originally intended this post to be a review of 2007 Final for PCLinuxOS. However, after finishing it up, I realized that posting a review wouldn’t have the desired effect of truly showing off PCLinuxOS to everyone. It would just be a “business as usual” type of post. So, I decided to do a analysis on what I feel sets PCLinuxOS apart from many Linux distributions.

Ubuntu’s User Interface: No Learning Required

Filed under
Ubuntu

allaboutubuntu: A few hours after setting up my new Dell Ubuntu PC, my wife jumped onto the system. You know her kind: She is an Apple Mac OS fan who uses Windows — but doesn’t really like Windows. So, how did she do with Linux?

Initial Review of Ubuntu 7.04 on Dell Laptop

Filed under
Ubuntu

ITtoolbox Blogs: Recently I found that Dell has partnered with Canonical to offer the latest version of Ubuntu (7.04) with the sale of new Dell computers. (See Dell Sells Computers with Ubuntu & 100th Entry!) This piqued my interest because of the hoops I had to jump through to get my Dell Intel Pro Wireless (IPW) 2200bg card to work with Fedora Core 4. My theory is that Ubuntu 7.04 should be incredibly easy to install and configure on my Dell laptop. So I put my theory to the test.

Creating the GNOME 2.18 Live Media: An interview with Ken VanDine

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Interviews

The Gnome Journal: Paul Cutler interviews Ken VanDine, founder of Foresight Linux, on building images for the recent GNOME 2.18 Live Media release. Ken discusses his goals in helping create new GNOME Live Media, the tools he used in putting the different images together, and his plans for future GNOME Live Media releases.

NVIDIA Graphics: Linux v. Solaris

Filed under
Software

Phoronix: At Phoronix we are constantly exploring the different display drivers under Linux, and while we have reviewed Sun's Check Tool and test motherboards with Solaris in addition to covering a few other areas, we have yet to perform a graphics driver comparison between Linux and Solaris. That is until today.

Linux: Kernel Documentation and Translations

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Following a recent patch that translated Documentation/HOWTO into Japanese [story], a new patch offered a translation of the same document into Chinese. Li Yang noted, "Language could be the main obstacle. Hopefully this document will help."

Sharing Internet Connection in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu Geek: Setting up a computer to share its internet connection should be easy.After all, you’ve successfully networked your computers together and even shared files with all your home computers, so why not the Internet?

PCLinuxOS 2007 Synaptic Sections – Radically screwed up

Filed under
PCLOS

Ye Olde Blogge: Everybody knows PCLinuxOS is radically simple, right? And it is. It's one of the best Live CDs around because it has all the non-free codecs and plugins installed by default, it's easy to install on the harddisk, and it doesn't require much configuration afterwards – unless you are one of those people that like to configure, tweak and personalize their OS to the point of turning it into a new distro.

Setting Up Postfix As A Backup MX

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

In this tutorial I will show how you can set up a Postfix mailserver as a backup mail exchanger for a domain so that it accepts mails for this domain in case the primary mail exchanger is down or unreachable, and passes the mails on to the primary MX once that one is up again.

On Open Source Dying...

Filed under
OSS

Yet Another Linux Blog: Let me make it clear for you Michael Hickins of Eweek. Your Article "Is Open Source Dying?" doesn’t even make it into the outer ring of the target for facts. If you were trying to shoot an arrow into the air with this article, you’d miss.

KHTML and CSS 3

Filed under
KDE

/home/liquidat: Some days ago someone on slashdot mentioned that the next Opera version is going to pass all CSS 3 tests. While this is great news for Opera I wondered how well konqueror does on this tests.

Linux Shoots for Big League of Servers

Filed under
Linux

WSJ: Linux has had a great run. But to keep the growth, the upstart operating system needs to please more people like Jim Walsh.

10 Things To Do After You Install Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

sheehantu: Ubuntu is a great distro, but it still needs some slight tweaking to get it just right. I’m going to show you how to use Automatix2 to get your OS perfected.

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