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About Tux Machines

Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 32bit Vs 64bit Ubuntu srlinuxx 5 24/03/2011 - 8:28pm
Story A New, Happy Pardus User srlinuxx 1 24/03/2011 - 7:01pm
Story Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox in HTML5 Duel srlinuxx 1 24/03/2011 - 7:00pm
Story Microsoft Seeking personal unfair competition laws srlinuxx 1 24/03/2011 - 6:59pm
Story Unity has love handles srlinuxx 1 24/03/2011 - 6:56pm
Story Pixeljam Games Launch Dino Run SE for Mac, PC, and Linux srlinuxx 24/03/2011 - 5:04pm
Story Ubuntu 10.10 Vs Windows 7 Vs Mac OS X 10.6 srlinuxx 24/03/2011 - 5:02pm
Story Installing Firefox 4.0 (.deb Package) On Ubuntu 10.10 falko 24/03/2011 - 12:22pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 24/03/2011 - 6:04am
Story Is Scientific Linux 6 Right for You? The Review. srlinuxx 24/03/2011 - 6:03am

Let the Browser Wars begin

Filed under
Software

Firefox 2.0 is almost here, and Microsoft is expected to start pushing out Internet Explorer 7 to users via the Windows Automatic Update software-distribution mechanism by year's end. In short, the browser wars are about to begin again.

Who's Driving That Bus?

Filed under
OSS

It's Friday the 13th, and for some of us in the Western world it's a day where we walk a little more carefully. I enjoy delving into mysteries of the universe around us. The most prominent example of this is the GPL 2 vs. 3 debate, which seems to have some people convinced that it's the End of Linux kernel as We Know It.

CDT C/C++ parsing and its abstract syntax trees

Filed under
Linux

Parsing is one of the CDT's most crucial functions, but because of its complexity, parsing is also one of its least-understood aspects. This article introduces the parsing process used by the Eclipse C/C++ Development Tooling (CDT). This will help you Get a handle on one of the C/C++ Development Tooling's most crucial functions: the parsing process -- for error detection, indexing, and code-completion

My first 10 years with Linux

Filed under
Linux

I have now officially entered my second decade using Linux and free/open source software in a meaningful way. I began dabbling with Linux as early as 1995, but in June of 1996, I began using it for real when I created my first Web site. What's different these days from things 10 years ago?

Convert images with open source ImageMagick

Filed under
HowTos

Tools like the GIMP and similar graphical applications are great for modifying and manipulating images. Sometimes, however, they can be overkill for little things that need to be done, such as converting file types or resizing images. As well, a graphical tool can be time consuming and difficult to script, unlike CLI tools.

Analyst comments sink Red Hat shares

Filed under
Linux

Shares of Red Hat Inc., the largest distributor of the Linux operating system, tumbled more than 7 percent Friday after a Wall Street analyst suggested that Oracle Corp. may soon introduce its own Linux products.

Mandriva Linux 2007 PowerPack Edition review

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

Though delayed for a while and later to market than most Mandriva fans would probably prefer, the new Mandriva Linux 2007 PowerPack Edition is finally here, nearly a year after the previous release.

Yum 2nd part: Managing system updates

Filed under
HowTos

After covering the basics of Yum in my first article, let’s move on to the second part. In this article I’d like to cover some things about keeping your system up to date with Yum on a CentOS 4 system.

Danger from the Deep 0.2 released

Filed under
Gaming

Danger from the Deep (aka dangerdeep) is an Free/Open Source World War II german uboat simulation. This release brings an massive number of new features, improvements, and bug fixes.

Linux Newbies - Lots of ways to look at your system stats

Filed under
HowTos

So you want to find out what your linux system is doing? There are a few ways you can go about doing this. Actually, there are a ton of ways, but we’re going to look at a few of them. Some of them are graphical and pretty and some are CLI but all of them are useful.

Beryl and XGL on Ubuntu Linux with ATI card

Filed under
HowTos

So yesterday I tryed Beryl on Ubuntu Dapper, even though Beryl is only v.0.1 I must say it seems pretty stable and works great on my laptop... I will, in this post make a guide to how I got it all working..

Open Source Boosts Thrills in 'Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory'

Filed under
Gaming

For its time, I didn't know how "Return to Castle Wolfenstein" could be improved upon. When Id Software and Activision released its source code in 2004, however, the open source and mod community got to work. The result was "Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory," an open source effort by Splash Damage and other contributors that takes the best of the old game and actually improves upon a classic experience.

Apache highlights open source projects

Filed under
Software

Open source technologies including Apache's Struts Java development framework and Jackrabbit content repository were among the projects debuting or getting upgraded at the ApacheCon conference in Austin, Texas, this week.

Mandriva One Not the Linux Dinosaur of Old

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

I found early versions of Linux weren't very user-friendly, so this time around, I used my 7-year-old son as my test subject. I gave him a little lesson on how to use Mandriva One and off he went. On his own, he was able to boot up the machine and get himself online to his favorite kid Web sites without any problems at all -- meaning today's Linux has a short learning curve.

Free deluxe open source content management system

Filed under
Software

WebAPP is a content management system written in Perl and licensed under the GNU General Public License. WebAPP requires no SQL backend, no PHP, only a hosting environment offering support for Perl.

Interrupt Management Under Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Bill Gatliff provides a walkthrough of the portions of the Linux kernel that manage interrupts and describes how Linux interacts with interrupt controllers and how to adapt code for custom hardware.

Microsoft-led project to deliver on ODF

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft later this month plans to release a converter that will let Word users open documents saved in the OpenDocument format.

Nexenta combines OpenSolaris, GNU, and Ubuntu

Filed under
OS

What do you get when you combine OpenSolaris, the GNU utilities, and Ubuntu? Nexenta -- a GNU-based open source operating system built on top of the OpenSolaris kernel and runtime. I took the Alpha 5 release out for a spin to see how well it's progressing. It might sound like an odd combination, but after more than a year of development, it actually works well, and is shaping up to be a very interesting operating system.

KDE 3.5.5 Screenshots Tour in Kubuntu

Filed under
Linux

Now we will see KDE3.5.5 Screenshots. We have already discussed how to upgrade the existing KDE Desktop to KDE 3.5.5.Now we are going to see screenshots for KDE 3.5.5 in Kubuntu this includes Graphics, Internet, Office, System, Utilities and wallpapers i hope you like these nice screenshots.

Cacti on CentOS 4.x

Filed under
HowTos

For those who don't know, Cacti's goal is to create nice graphs about system performance and status. This howto describes how to install and configure Cacti quickly on a CentOS server.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.

Development News

  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings
    U.K.-based technology analyst firm RedMonk just released the latest version of its biannual rankings of programming languages, and once again JavaScript tops the list, followed by Java and PHP. Those are same three languages that topped RedMonk’s list in January. In fact, the entire top 10 remains the same as it was it was six months ago. Perhaps the biggest surprise in Redmonk’s list—compiling the “performance of programming languages relative to one another on GitHub and Stack Overflow”—is that there are so few surprises, at least in the top 10.
  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest
    It's no surprise that C and Java share the top two spots in the IEEE Spectrum's latest Interactive Top Programming Languages survey, but R at number five? That's a surprise. This month's raking from TIOBE put Java at number one and C at number two, while the IEEE reverses those two, and the IEEE doesn't rank assembly as a top-ten language like TIOBE does. It's worth noting however that the IEEE's sources are extremely diverse: the index comprises search results from Google, Twitter, GitHub, StackOverflow, Reddit, Hacker News, CareerBuilder, Dice, and the institute's own eXplore Digital Library. Even then, there are some oddities in the 48 programming environments assessed: several commenters to the index have already remarked that “Arduino” shouldn't be considered a language, because code for the teeny breadboard is written in C or C++.