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Monday, 18 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Microsoft Loves Linux - or So They Say Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 6:36pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 11:31am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 11:30am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 11:29am
Story Linus Torvalds runs one of the most world's important software projects from a tiny 'Zombie shuffling' desk Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 9:15am
Story Linux 4.0-RC1 Tagged, Linux 4.0 Will Bring Many Notable Improvements Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 9:06am
Story Running Bodhi 3.0.0 Legacy on Older Hardware Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 8:47am
Story Q4OS 0.5.26 version released Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 8:45am
Story Leftovers: KDE and GNOME Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 11:27pm
Story Ubuntu 15.04 to Get Locally Integrated Menus by Default Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 11:23pm

In Skins vs Believers: Linux always loses

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: When Microsoft hires somebody like IDG to prove that Linux is less effective than Windows it’s easy to separate argument from arguers - and when the consultants prove their case by hiring the least competent MCSEs they can find and turning them loose with the Linux root password.

The State of UK Terrestrial Web TV

Filed under
Just talk

So what i'd like to do here, is round up the offerings of the main 5 TV channels, what i'm looking for, is the following, how do they work on the following platforms. WindowsXP, Ubuntu 8.10 and Mac OSX Tiger. I'm using XP and not vista, because i believe there are more XP installs out there. i'll use firefox as the browser of choice to keep the browser the same across all browsers, however will also give the default browser for each OS a go as well, just to see how different the experience is.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Some praise for Fedora and some other stuff

  • P-Magazine using Drupal
  • Moonshiner: a graphical front-end to ps2pdf
  • Netbook Heroes
  • Updating Linux Passwords Via The Web Browser
  • Animated Wallpaper on your Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop
  • epidermis - Download and Apply Theme Packs in one Click
  • Safely Using Files as Block Devices with Partitions
  • Dear Debian developers
  • QuickStart - Back-up, Restore, and Set-up Ubuntu Quickly and Easily
  • USB 3.0 Demo with 5 second Ubuntu boot!!
  • KDE Forums: What's new?
  • Bulletproof your server to survive Digg/Slashdot
  • Windows you done stole my netbook market away: Linux
  • The Gritty World Of User Interface Exploration
  • Enemies of GNU/Linux?
  • debtree - Generate Package Dependency Graphs
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #121

The Freedom Key

Filed under
Hardware

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: I bought a Dell M1330 laptop with Ubuntu pre-installed and yet it still has a key on the keyboard proudly displaying the Windows logo. So how could I fix this? Looking at the SFLC logo it struck me that what I needed was a "frdm" key.

Fedora Core 10 might make me a believer again

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: For a long time I was a wearer of the Fedora. Starting with Red Hat 4.2 all the way to 8 and then adopting Fedora when Red Hat when corporate, I was a proud user of all things Fedora. But then something happened.

I hope someone maintains Amarok 1.4

Filed under
Software

briancarper.net: Amarok 2 was released on December 10th. I have KDE 4 on my experimentation laptop, so I tried it. I don't like it.

KDE 4.2 Beta++

Filed under
KDE

polishlinux.org: The Beta1 of KDE 4.2 Desktop Environment has been released at 26.11.2008. So it’s been there for a while - let’s take a look at the revision 893046.

Top Linux Moments of 2008

Filed under
Linux

lunduke.com: It’s been a rather interesting year for Linux, with just enough ups and downs to keep us on our toes. And, being as it is the heart of December, I figured now is a good time to scour through the Linux Action Shows of the past year and find, what I consider to be, the top moments from 2008.

More Happy holiday Wallpapers for KDE

Filed under
KDE

wadejolson.wordpress: There’s now a total of 11 holiday wallpapapers - enough to for the 12 Days of Christmas song assuming you already have a partridge in a pear tree wallpaper.

A Quantum of FOSS

Filed under
OSS

ubuntukids.org: I have been thinking for a while about how to get more exposure for Free and Open Source Software. I work in a school district which, like most, is owned by Microsoft. I have tried for several years to get more FOSS on the desktops and I have had only minimal success.

Slackware 12.2: Still not for me.

Filed under
Slack

techiemoe.com: Those of you who've read them know I'm not a fan, and a lot of people don't like that. Nevertheless, with each new version I hope that this one will be the one I can actually use. I admit there's a kind of geeky cool that comes from running Slackware.

ferm: a straightforward firewall configuration tool

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: Grumble… a postgresql server on an old Sun workstation isn’t visible to another old Sun workstation which (in theory…) is storing data on the postgresql server. The culprit was a misconfigured firewall.

“More Linux Distributions” Isn’t Necessarily the Answer

Filed under
Linux

jonathancarter.co.za: AJ Venter writes that we need more, not less Linux distributions. I’m not convinced that we need more distributions. More distributions would result in huge duplication of work:

Intel Atom On Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuSE, Mandriva

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: Back in September we looked at the Intel Atom performance on a few Linux distributions using the ASUS Eee PC 901, but now with new stable releases of some of the most popular distributions out in the wild, we've decided to re-conduct these tests. We are using a slightly different Atom-based system this time and we are comparing the performance on Ubuntu 8.10, Fedora 10, Mandriva 2008, and OpenSuSE 11.1.

Flock - The Ultimate Student Browser

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: I’m using Flock as my main browser. However for most of you, Firefox will be your choice. The reason I would recommend using Flock over Firefox to create the ultimate student research browser is the number of built in functionalities which really is quite useful for a student.

Also: Install Flock in Ubuntu

Benchmarks: gtk+ engines

Filed under
Software

gentoo.org/developers/nightmorph: Here are some fast and dirty benchmarks of various gtk+ engines installed on my system, using app-benchmarks/gtkperf-0.40.

How To Help A Newbie

Filed under
Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: I was once a newbie to Linux. That was several years ago now, but I remember the feeling of using it for the first time. Unfortunately, many newbies open that door and it gets slammed in their face. I have seen first hand how newbies and experienced users work together.

Also: Linux. There Are No Stupid Questions.
And: Ubuntu users.

Virtualization With KVM On Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on an Ubuntu 8.10 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

Interview with Samba's Jeremy Allison

Filed under
Interviews

techradar.com: Jeremy Allison's contributions to the free software world are legion, and yet the project he's best known for continues to be Samba. Linux Format magazine asked him about KDE, NAS, LSB, DCs and other acronyms, and now his answers are here for your TLA titillation…

Happy holidays from KDE

Filed under
KDE

wadejolson.wordpress: I actually had some free time tonight, and that means holiday wallpapers for you, gentle reader. Four 1920×1200 wallpapers and one 1600×1200 one.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

  • An Open Source Load Balancer for OpenShift
    A highly-available deployment of OpenShift needs at least two load balancers: One to load balance the control plane (the master API endpoints) and one for the data plane (the application routers). In most on-premise deployments, we use appliance-based load balancers (such as F5 or Netscaler).
  • Red Hat Beefs Up Platform as a Service Suite
    Red Hat has begun shipping Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service (iPaaS) offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, the vendor says expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • Red Hat ‘Fuses’ Low Code Development and Data Integration
    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, Red Hat is expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects
    As of today, all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start. This is the latest development in an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses. The “automatic termination” provision in GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x is often interpreted as terminating the license upon noncompliance without a grace period or other opportunity to correct the error in compliance. When the Free Software Foundation released GPLv2 in 1991, it held nearly all GPL-licensed copyrights, in part a consequence of the copyright assignment policy then in place for GNU project contributions. Long after the Linux kernel and many other non-GNU projects began to adopt the GPL and LGPL, the FSF was still the only copyright holder regularly engaged in license enforcement. Under those conditions, the automatic termination feature of GPLv2 section 4 may have seemed an appropriate means of encouraging license compliance.
  • Monness Believes Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) Still Has Room to Grow
  • Comparing Red Hat (RHT) & Autoweb (AUTO)
  • As Red Hat (RHT) Share Value Rose, Calamos Advisors Upped Its Position by $300,831; Chilton Capital Management Increases Stake in Equinix (EQIX)
  • Blair William & Co. IL Buys 23,279 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Total War: WARHAMMER

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important. So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal. Read more

Android Leftovers