Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Cumulus Linux 2.5: A Cisco-killer in the data center Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 4:02pm
Story With This Tiny Box, You Can Anonymize Everything You Do Online Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 3:56pm
Story Where new European Commission leaders stand on open source Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 10:32am
Story Linux Mint 17 Now Lets Users Bookmark Folders in a Different Sidebar Section Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 10:25am
Story Nearly all of Romania’s universities use Moodle Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 10:22am
Story JIT Support Is Closer To Landing For GCC Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 9:45am
Story Rolling-release testing Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 9:16am
Story Open source streamlines pension system Croatia Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 8:23am
Story GTK+ Gains Native Support For OpenGL Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 6:01am
Story Meet on Open Source Software Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 5:15am

KDE Components: Folder View

Filed under
KDE

linuxevangelist.blogspot: Currently, the most talked about and criticized development project is the 4th major version released by the KDE team – KDE4. Though KDE4 omits features of its previous versions; it is much more powerful and has more potential than critics have expressed. After their challenging comments, I felt compelled to scrutinize some aspects of the same.

Face off: Windows vs Linux real world RAM and disk tests

Filed under
OS

itwire.com: Forget fear, uncertainty and doubt. How do Windows Vista and Linux really compare against each other? It’s one thing to talk about the familiar applications available to Windows users contrasted with the rich suite of free open source apps for Linux, but something totally different to actually compare the loads of the two operating systems as they perform functionally identical tasks.

Man vs. Myth: Greg Kroah-Hartman and the Kernel Driver Project

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Don't tell Greg Kroah-Hartman that Linux hurts for device drivers. He's heard too much of that rap, and he's already done plenty to stop it. We should thank him and help pick up the ball. I'm doing both here.

Automotive Linux drives innovation

Filed under
Linux

electronicsweekly.com: Some fundamental shifts have been taking place in the automotive industry over the past two years that will dramatically change the way multimedia entertainment equipment is designed.

SuSE 11.0: Winning me over quickly

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.techrepublic.com: I am on a roll here with reviewing distros, so I thought I would take the advice of my readers and add SuSE to the roll call. I went into this with little expectation simply because I have had less-than-stellar experiences with SuSE in the past. This time, however, my experience was much, much different.

Firefox add-on Glubble too clunky and restrictive as a children's Internet filter

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: Glubble is a free proprietary Firefox add-on from Glaxstar that limits the activity your child can perform online by blocking access to Web sites and filtering Google search results. For parents, a tool like Glubble can seem like the perfect answer to the problem of protecting kids from the unsavory elements of the Internet.

Linux Tales

Filed under
Linux
  • Becky the Linux user

  • The peril of /tmp
  • How Ubuntu Stopped me from having Sex
  • SSHFS made my life easier

Because the simple things in life are often the best

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Linux is not a monolithic monstrosity where everything is combined and intertwined into a hazy blob of bits and bytes. It actually consists of many of small discrete components, each of which is designed to do a single job, and do that job well.

Is open source software bad for business?

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: One security outfit which conducted a study into the use of open source software in the enterprise, the results of which are published today, seems to think so. It states that "Open Source Software (OSS) development communities have yet to adopt a secure development process and often leave dangerous vulnerabilities unaddressed."

Could a desktop Ubuntu bundle earn share?

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.zdnet.com: The big news from Ubuntu is they’re aiming at the server market with a bundle that includes an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) application or Point of Sale (POS) software.

Also: * Dell offers new machines with Linux Ubuntu 8.04
* Dell Launch Pre-Installed Ubuntu 8.04 Notebooks

Installing Mandriva 2008.1 on the ASUS Eee PC

Filed under
MDV

blogs.techrepublic.com: Out of the many distributions that work on the Eee PC, Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring (or 2008.1) is one that works exceptionally well. It can be installed to the built-in SSD or onto an external SD card.

Also: Asus Eee PC storms Euro PC maker chart

Security is no secret: NSA takes Flask to the open-source community

Filed under
OSS

gcn.com: Architecture created by the National Security Agency and expanded with help from the open-source community will save the Defense Department and intelligence agencies millions in hardware costs.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 262

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Guest Review: Sabayon Linux 3.5

  • News: Mandriva's netbook OS, Flaw in Package Management, Ubuntu's Community QA, Linus Interview
  • Released last week: CentOS 5.2 Live CD, BeleniX 0.7.1, BLAG Linux And GNU 90000
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.1 Alpha1, Ubuntu 8.10 Alpha 3, Fedora 10 Alpha
  • Reviewed last week: Myah OS, BLAG Linux And GNU 90000, Simplis GNU/Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly...

KGet - KDE’s Download Manager

Filed under
KDE
Software

fosswire.com: Download managers, although frowned upon by some, are often useful applications for those of us who download a lot of files. KGet is KDE’s resident dedicated download program and is capable of acting both as a download manager for the Konqueror browser, as well as a standalone program.

$249 Linux-powered CherryPal cloud PC uses just 2W

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

cnet.com: There's no OS to speak of, no optical drive, just 4GB of flash storage and 256MB of RAM, and you're limited to a 400MHz Freescale 5121E processor with integrated graphics under the hood. But the CherryPal desktop PC -- just revealed with a $249 price tag -- is definitely worth making a fuss over.

Critical Week for Canonical and Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

thevarguy.com: Canonical CEO and Ubuntu Linux backer Mark Shuttleworth will step into the spotlight July 22, when he keynotes OSCON (Open Source Convention) in Portland, Oregon. It will be a critical moment for Shuttleworth and the Ubuntu movement. Here’s why.

Helping Hands and openSUSE-Tutorials off to a great start

Filed under
SUSE

bryen.com" As some of you may know, several weeks ago, the openSUSE-GNOME Team launched the Helping Hands Project. We’ve had three sessions so far, and each time we host an event, the number of visitors to the #opensuse-gnome IRC channel increases.

Intel snubs Microsoft; offers Linux certification

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: Intel's enthusiasm for open source is gathering speed: now it is endorsing professional Linux certifications, snubbing the old Microsoft certification program.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Open Season #20

  • Using Perltidy To Beautify Ugly Perl Scripts
  • Drupal Daze
  • world’s most stickered laptop
  • Smail - the lighter mail server
  • Get file system and partition information in Linux/Unix
  • Searching for all ebuilds with specific useflag in Gentoo
  • People and their Operating Systems....
  • Stuff That Works With Linux #1 - Sitecom WL-113

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #100!

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 100 for the weeks July 13th - July 19th, 2008 is now available. In this issue we cover: UWN history, UWN Past & Present Staff Podcast, Mark Shuttleworth podcast, Comments from Past & Present Editors, and much much more.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.

Software: GIMP, Spyder, SMPlayer

  • Five free photo and video editing tools that could save burning a hole in your pocket and take your creativity to the next level
    GIMP stands for the Gnu Image Manipulation Program and is the first word that people usually think about when it comes to free image editors. It’s a raster graphics editor, available on multiple platforms on PC. It has a similar interface to Photoshop: you have your tools on one side, there’s an option for your tool window and then you have your layers window on another side. Perhaps one of the most useful features of GIMP is the option of plugins. There is a wide database for them and there’s a plugin for almost any task you might need to carry out. GIMP is extremely extensive, and it’s the choice of the FOSS community, thanks to the fact that it’s also open source. However, there are also some disadvantages. For example, GIMP has no direct RAW support yet (you have to install a plugin to enable it, which means a split workflow). It also has quite a bit of a learning curve as compared to Photoshop or Lightroom.
  • Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment
    If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python.
  • SMPlayer 18.2.2 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA
    SMPlayer is a free media player created for Linux and Windows, it was released under GNU General Public License. Unlike other players it doesn't require you to install codecs to play something because it carries its own all required codecs with itself. This is the first release which now support MPV and some other features such as MPRIS v2 Support, new theme, 3D stereo filter and more. It uses the award-winning MPlayer as playback engine which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats (avi, mkv, wmv, mp4, mpeg... see list).

Funding: Ethereum and Outreachy

  • How Will a $100 Mln Grant Help Ethereum Scale?
    On Feb. 16, six large-scale Blockchain projects OmiseGo, Cosmos, Golem, Maker and Raiden, that have completed successful multi-million dollar initial coin offerings (ICOs) last year, along with Japanese venture capital firm Global Brain have created the Ethereum Community Fund (ECF), to fund projects and businesses within the Ethereum ecosystem.
  • Outreachy Is Now Accepting Applications For Their Summer 2018 Internships
    This week Google announced the participating organizations for GSoC 2018 for students wishing to get involved with open-source/Linux development. Also happening this week is the application period opened for those wishing to participate in the summer 2018 paid internship program.