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Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The 10 Coolest Open Source Products Of 2008

Filed under
Software

crn.com: Open Source Software is about more than just the Linux operating system. Here's a look at the coolest open source products to come across the transom in 2008.

Watch Out - Great Looking Ubuntu Intrepid Apps

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Software

openmode.ca: When you install a fresh new version of Ubuntu on your machine, is there a time when you find yourself scrolling through the entire list of all available applications to install? Hoping to find something new that may make using your Linux system that much more easier, productive, or fun to use?

Replacing your Windows/Mac apps on Linux

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Software

jgadgets.com: Switching operating systems can be tough. When you get accustomed to certain applications sometimes it can be hard to learn how to use other ones. Here’s a quick guide so you can make your Linux machine feel like home.

Ubuntu and Desktop Notifications

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Ubuntu

chipx86.com: Being the maintainer of libnotify, notification-daemon and the Desktop Notifications specification, some people were concerned that this work would supersede my own.

It's a Wonderful FLOSS

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OSS

softwarefreedom.org/blog: I don't miss the opportunity to watch It's a Wonderful Life when it inevitably airs each year. This year, what jumped out at me was the second of the three key speeches that George Bailey gives in the film. I thought immediately of Microsoft's presence at OSCON this year and the launch of their campaign to pretend they haven't spent the last ten years trying destroy all of Free Software and Open Source.

If Santa Claus used Linux

Filed under
Linux
Humor

itwire.com: % time snow
% OneHorseOpenSleigh > fields
% banner lol

Windows vs Linux mk 2

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OS

aronzak.wordpress: A short while ago, I installed Windows XP on one of my computers. *horror*. It’s not so bad. It does some things quite well. Even after bloating it up with about 50 open source apps, it still seems to chug away quite merrily.

My New Laptop and Linux

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Linux

I got my first laptop as an early Christmas present. It's an Acer Aspire 6930. Since it has Intel 5100 wifi built in, I needed a Linux version that would support that.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • OpenSuSE 11.1 sadness

  • Mandriva One 2009 KDE
  • Ubuntu and Back Again, a Scenic Journey
  • Happy Holidays - More ASCII Art
  • Interview with Petko D. Petkov on Netsecurify
  • Configuring Gaim
  • Gentoo December public service announcement
  • Perl 5 Repository Transistions to Git
  • Starting, Stopping, and Connecting to OpenOffice with Python
  • FSF bootable membership cards are (finally) here!
  • MySQL: Now and Then… and Dual License Community Impact
  • How to make Transparent Png files in Linux
  • Open source becomes paid software in 2009
  • How To Run Emerald At Startup
  • Netbook Netbook Netbook Netbook Netbook
  • Displaying maps with OpenLayers

Wink - Tutorial and Presentation creation software

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Software

dedoimedo.com: Today, we'll learn how to create impressive, captivating animated screencast-like presentations that will help you deliver your ideas in a unique, highly professional manner.

AIR on Linux test run

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Software

computerworld.com: AIR (Adobe Integrated Runtime) is a cross-operating system runtime that lets you use rich Internet applications that combine HTML, Ajax, Adobe Flash, and Adobe Flex technologies. What that means to you and me is that it's lets us run another kind of application on our Internet-connected Windows PCs, Macs, and just this month, Linux desktop computers.

What’s Your Holiday Gift to the Linux Community?

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Linux

linuxloop.com: In case you forgot to put the Linux community on your list or in case you just couldn’t find anything for them, you’re in luck. There’s a last minute gift opportunity:

Blah blah blah Linux blog clients blah blah blah

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Software

kmandla.wordpress: I’m appalled. No, I’m worse than appalled. I’m horrified, shocked, amazed, disgusted, insulted and flummoxed. Apparently — and as always, please tell me if I am wrong — but there is no blogging software for Linux that does not have ties to the Gnome horde.

The GPL is not a burden

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OSS

loupgaroublond.blogspot: One editor of the LWN commented recently on his yearly predictions for the ecosystem and how well they performed. Perhaps the grumpy editor was a bit too grumpy this year. There hasn't even been enough coal to go around in people's stockings.

notifications

Filed under
KDE

Aaron Seigo: I do have to say that it's a little embarrassing that Mark's blog got picked up by places like Slashdot. I really hope it was a slow news day or something, but I suspect a bit of star worship at play.

Three Great Distributions for Christmas: sidux, AntiX M8.0 and SimplyMEPIS 8.0

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Linux

lxer.com: The Debian project has packaged and produced some really great software and the latest project, code named "Lenny" has resulted in a couple of really outstanding derivatives, AntiX and its parent SimplyMEPIS. In addition, the Debian project "Sid", has led to the creation of an awesome cutting edge system called sidux. Any of the three would make a great Christmas gift for the Linux geek in your life.

Linux in 2009: Recession vs. GNU

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Linux

earthweb.com: Pundits and business executives alike are predicting gloomy economic times for 2009. But when the talk turns to free and open source software (FOSS), suddenly the mood brightens. Whether their concern is the business opportunities in open source or the promotion of free software idealism, experts see FOSS as starting from a strong base and actually benefiting from the hard times expected next year.

Christmas Eve with KDE4

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KDE

teknostatik.co.uk: While I’m off for Christmas, I thought I’d spend a little time getting to know KDE4. To stop me cheating, I installed the latest KDE version of Mandriva One, which means I’m without a fair few other things I’m very reliant on.

Also: Little kchristmas present

Gifts for All in Linux 2.6.28

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Linux creator Linus Torvalds is expected to soon release the final Linux kernel of 2008, loaded full of stocking stuffers for users of the open source operating system.

Will commercialisation destroy Linux?

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Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: I have noticed a fellow wooden spoon brandishing compatriot mention several times that commercialisation will destroy the Linux dream. That when the smell of money starts effusing from Linux then the sharks will come and trample all over the Linux utopia.

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today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.