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Friday, 26 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Review: Arch64, Archlinux for 64bit processors

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I love Slackware, and at one time Arch Linux was my absolute favorite. I recently upgraded to an Athlon64 3200. I tried a variety of distros, only to run into problems I didn’t have time to fix. Fedora gave me a messed up Grub. Mandriva Free gave me problems with my video driver. Ubuntu Edgy has been fine. I saw that Arch Linux had a 64bit version and decided it was time to revisit it.

Influence scheduling priority with nice and renice

Filed under
HowTos

The "niceness" of a process is a numeric hint to the kernel about how the process should be treated in relation to other processes contending for the CPU. The strange name is derived from the fact that it determines how nice you are going to be to other users of the system. A high nice value means a low priority for your process: you are going to be nice. A low or negative value means high priority: you are not very nice. The range of allowable niceness values is -20 to +19.

Linux desktop auto start or launch programs

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HowTos

So how do you automatically start or launch program when you login into your KDE desktop system? For example if you would like to start program called xawtv (to watch tv) and mozilla-thunderbird mail client program.

Geronimo JNDI/Java resource connection pools, Part 1

Filed under
Linux

Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) is an interface to connection pools in the Apache Geronimo application server. Through this interface, developers have access to all Java objects, including Enterprise Java Beans (EJBs). This article series provides concept-rich documentation on how to use JNDI to access connection pools for data sources, Java Messaging Services (JMS), mail sessions, and URL connections.

Install Automatix2 in Ubuntu,Kubuntu,Xubuntu

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HowTos

Automatix is a graphical interface for automating the installation of the most commonly requested applications in Debian based Linux operating systems.

LDAP Series Part V - Grtting a Grip on Directory Service Modeling

Filed under
HowTos

While Linux has garnered a major part of the UNIX market, it has not made much progress in the enterprise management field. Without directory services to create a serious model of an enterprise, Linux will continue to remain a great application server. Under Novell, Linux will become a nice kernel for the Netware proprietary stack.

MA Governor-Elect Names MS Anti-ODF Lobbyist to Technology Advisory Group

Filed under
OSS

In a case of strange political timing, governor-elect Deval Patrick announced 15 transition team working groups the day before Thanksgiving. Patrick named 200 people to a wide variety of advisory groups covering topics as diverse as healthcare and civic engagement. Most of the eight people on that group were not a surprise. Oh yes. And one person from a major, out of state software company. Say what?

Why Fedora Matters

Filed under
Linux

Recent blog postings here on the O’Reilly Network and articles on Slashdot (including a recent review of my book) have generated some really strong negative comments about the Fedora project. Does Fedora really matter?

Using OpenOffice.org master pages in the real world -- Combining more than just Writer text documents

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HowTos

I took a look at some of the big honkin' reports that the City of Largo puts together. The answer to combining documents in a single publication is usually master documents, which work by organizing Writer text documents. But guess what?

SETI@home launches a new initiative and needs some help

Filed under
Misc

I just got an email from Arthur C. Clarke, famous author and scientist. SETI is implementing a new method of data collection and is looking to update their equipment. For this they need both users and dollars. If you’re interested, you can read the email in it’s entirety after the jump.

The 10 Greatest Operating System Upgrades Ever

Filed under
OS

Herewith, my idiosyncratic, extremely subjective list of the top ten, in chronological order. (Note that rating upgrades isn't quite the same exercise as rating operating systems, period--for one thing, it sort of rules out 1.0 versions, although I include one anyhow.) I'm pretty sure this isn't exactly the same as your list...

How to set up an encrypted filesystem in several easy steps

Filed under
HowTos

There's been a lot of talk lately about encrypted partitions, and Debian is proud to offer a feature to easily create them in the etch installer since beta3. But what about existing systems? This guide walks you through setting up an encrypted partition using cryptsetup and LUKS.

WordPerfect to support both ODF and Open XML

Filed under
Software

Corel Corp. promised months ago that it would support the OpenOffice.org ODF (Open Document Format). Now, we know it will support both ODF and Microsoft's Open XML next year.

Mark Shuttleworth: Govoritye po Russki?

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are 347 languages with more than a million speakers. But even Ubuntu, which has amazing infrastructure for translation and a great community that actually does the work, is nowhere close to being fully translated in more than 10 or 15 languages.

Hold Those Linux Lawsuits: Patent Standoff Pending

Filed under
Misc

As much fun as it has been -- and it has been fun -- to hear Steve Ballmer verbally backhand Linux distributors with threats of patent lawsuits, to watch the whole Microsoft-Novell Linux deal dissolve faster than a Britney Spears marriage, we all might want to take a step back and pay attention to something very important that will start this week: The US Supreme Court is going to take a look at patents.

Test-driving Adobe's Flash Player 9 beta

Filed under
Software

The stable Flash Player plugin for Linux is crusty old version 7 -- trailing more than two calendar years, two major revisions, and one corporate buyout behind the Windows and Mac offerings. But now Adobe has finally unveiled a beta release of Flash Player 9 for Linux. Was it worth the wait? And should you install it now, or hold off a little longer for the official, stable product instead?

RIAA wants the Internet shut down

Filed under
Web

ONE OF THE lawyers involved in defending cases bought against people by the RIAA claims that if the music industry wins a crucial case, the Internet will have to be switched off.

Firefox extensions: fun and games

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox is more than just a web browser. It’s also a cross-platform arcade machine. No quarters necessary.

Step-by-Step IPP based Print Server using CUPS

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This tutorial describes how to install a Linux print server with CUPS. It also covers the installation and configuration of printer drivers on the print server as well as the printer setup on a Windows 2000 client.

Linux Tool Highlight: Desktop Data Manager

Filed under
Software

I found this great utility for Gnome that I just can’t keep as a secret! Smile It is called the Desktop Data Manager and includes “a clipboard history for many different types of content” like text and images that sits in your notification area (system tray), and an application to take screenshots of a single window, a region of the screen, or the whole desktop. Being able to select the region of the screen is VERY important to me and it’s a huge time-saver.

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More in Tux Machines

Having offended everyone else in the world, Linus Torvalds calls own lawyers a 'nasty festering disease'

Coding curmudgeon Linus Torvalds has gone off on yet another rant: this time against his own lawyers and free software activist Bradley Kuhn. On a mailing list about an upcoming Linux conference, a discussion about whether to include a session on the GPL that protects the open source operating system quickly devolved in an angry rant as its founder piled in. Read more

The Battle of The Budgie Desktops – Budgie-Remix vs SolusOS!

Ladies and gentleman, it’s the moment you have all been waiting for… the main even of the evening! In this corner, wearing Budgie trunks, fighting out of Ireland, created by Ikey Doherty, the man behind Linux Mint Debian Edition — SolusOS! And in this corner, built on the defending champion, also wearing Budgie trunks, aiming to be the next flavor of Ubuntu, Budgie-Remix! Read more

Leftovers: Software

  • 5 Cool Unikernels Projects
    Unikernels are poised to become the next big thing in microservices after Docker containers. Here’s a look at some of the cool things you can do with unikernels. First, though, here’s a quick primer on what unikernels are, for the uninitiated. Unikernels are similar to containers in that they let you run an app inside a portable, software-defined environment. But they go a step further than containers by packaging all of the libraries required to run the app directly into the unikernel.
  • Cedrus Is Making Progress On Open-Source Allwinner Video Encode/Decode
    The developers within the Sunxi camp working on better Allwinner SoC support under Linux have been reverse-engineering Allwinner's "Cedar" video engine. Their project is being called Cedrus with a goal of "100% libre and open-source" video decode/encode for the relevant Cedar hardware. The developers have been making progress and yesterday they published their initial patches that add a V4L2 decoder driver for the VPU found on Allwinner's A13 SoC.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.6 Milestone 3 Released For Linux Benchmarking
  • Calibre 2.65.1 eBook Viewer Adds Driver for Kobo Aura One and Aura 2 Readers
    Kovid Goyal released today, August 26, 2016, a new maintenance update of his popular, cross-platform, and open-source Calibre e-book viewer, converter and library management tool. Calibre 2.65 was announced earlier, and it looks like it's both a feature and bugfix release that adds drivers for the Kobo Aura One and Kobo Aura Edition 2 ebook readers, along with a new option to the Kobo driver to allow users to ignore certain collections on their ebook reader. The list of new features continues with support for right-to-left text and tables to the DOCX Input feature, as well as the implementation of a new option to allow users to make searching case-sensitive. This option can be found and enabled in the "Searching" configuration section under Preferences.
  • Calamares 2.4 Universal Installer Framework Polishes Existing Functionality
    A new stable version of the Calamares universal installer framework used by various GNU/Linux distributions as default graphical installer has been released with various improvements and bug fixes. Calamares 2.4 is now the latest build, coming two months after the release of the previous version, Calamares 2.3, which introduced full-disk encryption support. However, Calamares 2.4 is not as big as the previous update as it only polished existing functionality and address various annoying issues reported by users.
  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.400.2.0
    Another Armadillo 7.* release -- now at 7.400. We skipped the 7.300.* serie release as it came too soon after our most recent CRAN release. Releasing RcppArmadillo 0.7.400.2.0 now keeps us at the (roughly monthly) cadence which works as a good compromise between getting updates out at Conrad's sometimes frantic pace, while keeping CRAN (and Debian) uploads to about once per month. So we may continue the pattern of helping Conrad with thorough regression tests by building against all (by now 253 (!!)) CRAN dependencies, but keeping release at the GitHub repo and only uploading to CRAN at most once a month.
  • Spotio Is A Light Skin for Spotify’s Desktop App — And Its Coming To Linux
    Spotify’s dark design is very much of its identity. No-matter the platform you use it on, the dark theme is there staring back at you. Until now. A bunch of ace websites, blogs and people I follow have spent the past 24 hours waxing lyrical over a new Spotify skin called Spotio.