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Tuesday, 20 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 12:36pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 12:35pm
Story generators in firefox now twenty-two times faster Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 12:14pm
Story NVIDIA Launches Massive Linux Driver Update Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 12:10pm
Story HighDPI in KDE Applications Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 12:05pm
Story Linux Lite 2.2 Beta 1 Is Fast, Light, and the Perfect Replacement for Windows Systems Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 11:55am
Story Microsoft must finish the job of opening .Net Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 11:49am
Story GlobalSight shines with open source in the translation community Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 11:47am
Story Intel Publishes More Skylake Linux Graphics Patches Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 11:46am
Story How open source is changing our food Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 10:58am

Attack of the GNU/Linux Ultraportables, Part 2

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Glyn Moody: As I noted the other day, ultraportables are not only hot, but they've changed the dynamics of the entire desktop sector. With the imminent arrival of the Dell effort in this sector, we've clearly reached a significant milestone, but that doesn't mean that things are going to get boring. Here's what marks the start of phase 2:

Mandriva : MIB Live Games 2008.1 released

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MDV Marcello Anni announced on Cooker ML the release of the MIB Live Games 2008.1. MIB ( Mandriva Italian Backports ) is a derived distribution of Mandriva Linux done by the Italian Mandriva community.

Kernel Log: New stable and pre-release kernels, Ubuntu 8.10 with 2.6.27?

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Linux The kernel developers have been busy in the last few days with several new Linux versions being released. Kernel versions and in the stable series have numerous fixes and minor improvements and some drivers.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 267

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This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Interviews: Kris Moore, PC-BSD lead developer

  • News: Fedora and Red Hat servers compromised - CentOS unaffected, Novell extends "interoperability" deal; openSUSE ads SELinux support, gNewSense celebrates second birthday, user-visible changes in NetBSD 5.0
  • Released last week: antiX MEPIS 7.5, gNewSense 2.1
  • Upcoming releases: Tentative release dates for FreeBSD 6.4, 7.1
  • Site news: Translation to Urdu, status reclassification
  • New additions: openmamba GNU/Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Swedish Television Rumored to Expose Microsoft’s Mojave Campaign

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Microsoft While everyone is talking about the fact that Jerry Sienfled has signed up to pitch Microsoft Vista it is worth noting another ad campaign that Microsoft launched last week entitled the “Mojave Experiment.”

openSUSE 11 - Desktop Emphasis

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superphysics.awardspace: I had said earlier that I was really going to put this one to the blade. Why? Because openSUSE 10.3 happens to be my favourite distro so far, and I was under the hope that this would be a good if not better. And I would test this with KDE 4, because that is the only real reason I would shift to 11.0 from 10.3.

Better bookmark tagging with HandyTag, Tagmarks, and TagSifter

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Moz/FF The bookmark tagging feature introduced in Firefox 3 is not particularly difficult in use: when bookmarking a Web page, enter the tags you like into the Tags field of the bookmarking dialog window and you are pretty much done. Tagging provides a more flexible way of keeping track of bookmarks than traditional folders.

today's leftovers

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  • Ubuntu Eee 8.04.1 release - live - Day 2

  • Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron - Second Chance, Wireless Works and was Easy
  • 3 Things in Linux you should NOT Install
  • Unix and Linux Online Language Translation Script
  • Open Source Software and Patents: An Uneasy Journey of Discovery and Understanding
  • Linux Outlaws 52 - Not Sponsored by Dell

some howtos:

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  • Reworking Shell Scripts

  • Easy File Sharing
  • HOWTO: Easy music sharing (or anything else you want)
  • Enable sendmail mailstats
  • Manage a Linux RAID 10 Storage Server
  • How To Install And Setup Jinzora Media Server In Ubuntu
  • 20 sureshot steps to install Ubuntu from USB
  • Using the Bcfg2 SSHbase plugin

First Impressions of Ubuntu 8.04

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randombloggings.wordpress: When I purchased a laptop a little over a year ago I wanted nothing to do with Vista. As a result I was determined to create a dual-boot setup with Windows XP (so I could play some games) and Ubuntu (so I could actually have a working system).

Open source still looking to shake off concerns

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OSS Although open source software has gained a place in enterprise networks alongside proprietary software, it can't seem to shake doubts about security and intellectual-property issues that have long dogged the movement.

EasyTag: a graphical interface to managing your music files’ tags

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Software EasyTag is a graphical utility to edit the descriptive ID3 tags for your music files. One will think primarily of MP3 files, but it also does other formats, such as Ogg, FLAC, MP4/AAC, MusePack, Monkey’s Audio files and WavPack files (APE tag).

Mozilla turbocharges Firefox, touts major speed gains

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Moz/FF Mozilla Corp. said Friday it has added the fruits of a two-month JavaScript turbo power project to the latest preview of its next browser, Firefox 3.1, that boosts some benchmark speeds by nearly 40 times over Firefox 3.0.

Greens urge end to software patents The Green Party has called for an overhaul of patent laws that would prevent software being patented. The party's policy on information technology was released by MP Metiria Turei.

Why does Apple Always Seem to Get a Break???

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OS Walking around Linuxworld this year it was interesting to see the number of Apple notebooks in the halls and various sessions. It wasn’t necessarily that there were more Apple notebooks than Linux machines, but it was a good number and begs the question: why do open source people seem to cut Apple some slack when it comes to their very closed proprietary platform?

Ubuntu: Can Your Business Trust A Free System

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Ubuntu Got to be honest, the first time I heard about Ubuntu was sometime April of this year over at Archon-Digital’s blog when he made an article of his switch to Ubuntu. Even after reading his post, I still didn’t get the idea of what exactly Ubuntu is all about.

New Linux-powered Kindle on its way

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Hardware The Kindle, Amazon’s Linux-powered electronic paper book will have at least one new version out for the 2008 holiday season. The second generation Kindle is expected to have both an improved user-interface and a larger screen.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #105

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The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #105 for the week of August 17th - August 23rd, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Major update of Ubuntu Brainstorm: Call for testing, Ubuntu New Jersey 2008 BBQ/LAN party, and Happy Birthday Linux.

Ubuntu 8.10 - My Thoughts So Far

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Ubuntu I know it’s only Alpha 4, but I decided to install it on my laptop last night because I can, and I had nothing else to do. So far so good, it’s got to be said! There’s a few issues I’ve noticed though, these are:

Debating the Firefox SSL Certificate

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Moz/FF Debate is reaching a fever pitch over a new security feature in Firefox 3.0 that throws out a warning page to users when a Web site's SSL certificate is expired or has not been issued by a trusted third party.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE: KDE Applications 18.04, KDE Connect, KMyMoney 5.0.1 and Qt Quick

  • KDE Applications 18.04 branches created
    Make sure you commit anything you want to end up in the KDE Applications 18.04 release to them :)
  • KDE Connect – State of the union
    We haven’t blogged about KDE Connect in a long time, but that doesn’t mean that we’ve been lazy. Some new people have joined the project and together we have implemented some exciting features. Our last post was about version 1.0, but recently we released version 1.8 of the Android app and 1.2.1 of the desktop component some time ago, which we did not blog about yet. Until now!
  • KMyMoney 5.0.1 released
    The KMyMoney development team is proud to present the first maintenance version 5.0.1 of its open source Personal Finance Manager. Although several members of the development team had been using the new version 5.0.0 in production for some time, a number of bugs and regressions slipped through testing, mainly in areas and features not used by them.
  • Qt Quick without a GPU: i.MX6 ULL
    With the introduction of the Qt Quick software renderer it became possible to use Qt Quick on devices without a GPU. We investigated how viable this option is on a lower end device, particularly the NXP i.MX6 ULL. It turns out that with some (partially not yet integrated) patches developed by KDAB and The Qt Company, the performance is very competitive. Even smooth video playback (with at least half-size VGA resolution) can be done by using the PXP engine on the i.MX6 ULL.

Red Hat Leftovers

Debian Leftovers

  • RcppSMC 0.2.1: A few new tricks
    A new release, now at 0.2.1, of the RcppSMC package arrived on CRAN earlier this afternoon (and once again as a very quick pretest-publish within minutes of submission).
  • sbuild-debian-developer-setup(1) (2018-03-19)
    I have heard a number of times that sbuild is too hard to get started with, and hence people don’t use it. To reduce hurdles from using/contributing to Debian, I wanted to make sbuild easier to set up. sbuild ≥ 0.74.0 provides a Debian package called sbuild-debian-developer-setup. Once installed, run the sbuild-debian-developer-setup(1) command to create a chroot suitable for building packages for Debian unstable.
  • control-archive 1.8.0
    This is the software that maintains the archive of control messages and the newsgroups and active files on I update things in place, but it's been a while since I made a formal release, and one seemed overdue (particularly since it needed some compatibility tweaks for GnuPG v1).
  • The problem with the Code of Conduct
  • Some problems with Code of Conducts

OSS Leftovers

  • Can we build a social network that serves users rather than advertisers?
    Today, open source software is far-reaching and has played a key role driving innovation in our digital economy. The world is undergoing radical change at a rapid pace. People in all parts of the world need a purpose-built, neutral, and transparent online platform to meet the challenges of our time. And open principles might just be the way to get us there. What would happen if we married digital innovation with social innovation using open-focused thinking?
  • Digital asset management for an open movie project
    A DAMS will typically provide something like a search interface combined with automatically collected metadata and user-assisted tagging. So, instead of having to remember where you put the file you need, you can find it by remembering things about it, such as when you created it, what part of the project it connects to, what's included in it, and so forth. A good DAMS for 3D assets generally will also support associations between assets, including dependencies. For example, a 3D model asset may incorporate linked 3D models, textures, or other components. A really good system can discover these automatically by examining the links inside the asset file.
  • LG Releases ‘Open Source Edition’ Of webOS Operating System
  • Private Internet Access VPN opens code-y kimono, starting with Chrome extension
    VPN tunneller Private Internet Access (PIA) has begun open sourcing its software. Over the next six months, the service promises that all its client-side software will make its way into the hands of the Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) community, starting with PIA's Chrome extension. The extension turns off mics, cameras, Adobe's delightful Flash plug-in, and prevents IP discovery. It also blocks ads and tracking. Christel Dahlskjaer, director of outreach at PIA, warned that "our code may not be perfect, and we hope that the wider FOSS community will get involved."
  • Open sourcing FOSSA’s build analysis in fossa-cli
    Today, FOSSA is open sourcing our dependency analysis infrastructure on GitHub. Now, everyone can participate and have access to the best tools to get dependency data out of any codebase, no matter how complex it is.
  • syslog-ng at SCALE 2018
    It is the fourth year that syslog-ng has participated at Southern California Linux Expo or, as better known to many, SCALE ‒ the largest Linux event in the USA. In many ways, it is similar to FOSDEM in Europe, however, SCALE also focuses on users and administrators, not just developers. It was a pretty busy four days for me.
  • Cisco's 'Hybrid Information-Centric Networking' gets a workout at Verizon
  • Verizon and Cisco ICN Trial Finds Names More Efficient Than Numbers
  • LLVM-MCA Will Analyze Your Machine Code, Help Analyze Potential Performance Issues
    One of the tools merged to LLVM SVN/Git earlier this month for the LLVM 7.0 cycle is LLVM-MCA. The LLVM-MCA tool is a machine code analyzer that estimates how the given machine code would perform on a specific CPU and attempt to report possible bottlenecks. The LLVM-MCA analysis tool uses information already used within LLVM about a given CPU family's scheduler model and other information to try to statically measure how the machine code would carry out on a particular CPU, even going as far as estimating the instructions per cycle and possible resource pressure.
  • Taking Data Further with Standards
    Imagine reading a book, written by many different authors, each working apart from the others, without guidelines, and published without edits. That book is a difficult read — it's in 23 different languages, there's no consistency in character names, and the story gets lost. As a reader, you have an uphill battle to get the information to tell you one cohesive story. Data is a lot like that, and that's why data standards matter. By establishing common standards for the collection, storage, and control of data and information, data can go farther, be integrated with other data, and make "big data" research and development possible. For example, NOAA collects around 20 terabytes of data every day.Through the National Ocean Service, instruments are at work daily gathering physical data in the ocean, from current speed to the movement of schools of fish and much more. Hundreds of government agencies and programs generate this information to fulfill their missions and mandates, but without consistency from agency to agency, the benefits of that data are limited. In addition to federal agencies, there are hundreds more non-federal and academic researchers gathering data every day. Having open, available, comprehensive data standards that are widely implemented facilitates data sharing, and when data is shared, it maximizes the benefits of "big data"— integrated, multi-source data that yields a whole greater than its parts.