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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Firefox 3 Beta 3 Brings a New Browsing Interface

Filed under
Moz/FF

eweek.com: With the release of Beta 3 of Firefox 3, we are definitely getting closer to the final release of Mozilla's open-source Web browser. But for a third beta, this version of Firefox 3 includes some fairly significant changes from the previous betas, including changes to the main user interface of the browser.

Installing Ubuntu(s) on a Windows 98-era Laptop

Filed under
Linux

ibeentoubuntu.blogspot: My friend told me that his laptop wasn't working, and asked if I would fix it for him. He volunteered that he was open to Ubuntu, which I had installed on some mutual friends' computers. I started a download of Linpus and torrented gOS 2.0.

Survey: Half 'Have No Plans' To Deploy Vista

Filed under
OS

adtmag.com: The survey asked participants if they had "considered the possibility of deploying any non-Windows operating system as an alternative to adopting Windows Vista." It turned out that 44 percent of participants said that they were indeed considering a non-Windows alternative.

Time to dump Windows?

Filed under
OS

InfoWorld: InfoWorld's "Save XP" petition asking Microsoft to keep Windows XP available indefinitely has prompted many readers to suggest that maybe the best answer for those who don't like Vista is to switch to another operating system completely. Can it be done? Is it the right time? Find out what it'll take to finally switch to desktop Mac OS X or Linux.

Fedora Developer Interview: KDE 4

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Interviews

fedoraproject.org: KDE 4 is set to be the default KDE environment in the next major release of Fedora. We caught up with two members of the KDE SIG to talk about the work they're doing to get it ready for release, their own opinions on the software and what they think about the progress made by Fedora in getting over its GNOME centric reputation.

Five must-have apps for a new Linux install

Filed under
Software

tectonic.co.za: So, having re-installed a brand new copy of Ubuntu and required updates, there are a few applications that I immediately download because, without them, I would not be able to do most of my day-to-day work. Here, in no particular order, are the five application or tools I have to have but aren’t included in a default Ubuntu install.

Inside Firefox 3's Latest Beta Update

Filed under
Moz/FF

LinuxInsider: Based on Mozilla's Gecko 1.9 Web rendering platform, which has been under development for 30 months, Firefox 3 beta 3 contains some 2 million lines of code changes that correct more than 12,000 issues, according to Mozilla. While Gecko is designed to support open Internet standards, version 1.9 includes redesigns for a variety of improvements.

Top 6 apps you should install after installing Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

stardustinmybones.wordpress: My top 6 favourite applications to be installed on Ubuntu Linux would be as follows:

Playing with Pendrivelinux

Filed under
Linux

pammiepi.blogspot: Always intrigued by alternative operating systems, I decided to play with Pen Drive Linux this weekend...a portable open source operating system which can be booted to from a USB flash drive, or can be run from within Windows without rebooting.

Giving Linux Another Try

Filed under
Ubuntu

eriksrantz.blogspot: So, I decided to give Linux another try, it's been a few years and the last time was frustrating enough to say it's not ready enough yet. I formatted and forgot about it. Well, now I keep hearing about Ubuntu and "it just works", fanboys tout it as better than Windows and easier to use.

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 updated to 4.0r3

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: The Debian project is pleased to announce the third update of its stable distribution Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (codename etch). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustment to serious problems.

The £99 laptop: how can it be so cheap?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

timesonline.co.uk: A new laptop computer for just £99 sounds like the kind of offer found in a spam e-mail or on a dodgy auction website. But the British company Elonex is launching the country’s first sub £100 computer later this month and hopes to be making 200,000 of them by the summer. It will be aimed at schoolchildren and teenagers, and runs on Linux.

Linux, which and why?

Filed under
Linux

kalyanchakravarthy.net: Linux is awsome, and i definitely recommend everyone to try it. To give you reasons i can say, Linux has better graphics, even better than vista and consumes much less ram than vista does.

The Top Ten Usability Problems With Ubuntu 8.04LTS Hardy Heron

Filed under
Ubuntu

ibeentoubuntu.blogspot: I've put together my opinion on the top ten usability issues that exist now in Hardy's Alpha and will most certainly be in the final long-term release. I also try to suggest a solution, if there is one.

opensuse livecd

Filed under
SUSE

chani.wordpress: I tried out the opensuse livecd (vesion 1.0.61) last night, and it was… odd. I was too tired to poke around much - I just wanted to have a backup run overnight - so I only really noticed negative things. sorry.

Gimp Tip.

Filed under
GIMP

oneclicklinux.blogspot: I've been using the Gimp now for a few years and have really come to love it. Since getting my larger 22-inch flat panel, The Gimp has become much easier to use.

The (bad) deal with freebsd-update(8)

Filed under
BSD

beranger.org: The binary patches are quite a mysterious issue in FreeBSD, no matter freebsd-update( 8 ) is around since about 2005, and since FreeBSD 6.3-RELEASE it reached a new level of power. As I have had quarrels with FreeBSD aficionados on the issue of binary patches in FreeBSD, I thought I should clear a bit the mess.

Not the Gentoo Weekly Newsletter, Part 5

Filed under
Gentoo

It's not that time of the week again, so here's another Not the GWN. Highlights include a lection on buzzwords, discordian dates and how to file bugs. Some recipes and beer recomendations included, etc. etc. pp. Squid pro quo, carpe diem and honi soit qui mal y pense.

Have Dinner with Bruce Perens in San Francisco this Tuesday

Filed under
Misc

technocrat.net: Bruce Perens will be speaking at the BALUG meeting in San Francisco on Tuesday at 6:30 PM. Chinese dinner will be served.

Linux Notes: Latest ATI graphics drivers installed

Filed under
Software

blogbeebe.blogspot: I'm now running with the latest ATI/AMD Linux drivers, 8.02. You can go to the Ubuntu Gutsy Installation Guide and use Method 2 to install them. I've been installing pretty much every release that's come out, especially all of this year's (2008).

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KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu Site, Marble Maps, Kube in Randa, and UX in GNOME

  • Call for design: Artful Banner for Kubuntu.org website
    Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.
  • Randa 2017 Report – Marble Maps
    Just came back home yesterday from Randa Meetings 2017. This year, even though my major motive for the sprint was to use Qt 5.8’s Qt Speech module instead of custom Java for text-to-speech during navigation, that could not be achieved because of a bug which made the routes not appear in the app in the first place. And this bug is reproducible both by using latest code, and old-enough code, and is even there in the prod app in the Google Play Store itself. So, although most of my time had gone in deep-diving on the issue, unfortunately I was not able to find the root-cause to it eventually. I will need to pick up on that in the coming weeks again when I get time, to get it fixed.
  • Kube in Randa
    I’ve spent the last few days with fellow KDE hackers in beautiful Randa in the Swiss Mountains. It’s an annual event that focuses on a specific topic every year, and this time accessibility was up, so Michael and me made our way up here to improve Kube in that direction (and to enjoy the scenic surroundings of course).
  • Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes
    In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13. When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use. To make sure our programs can be used by our intended audience, we need usability testing. Usability is basically asking the question, "Can people easily use this thing?" or "Can real people use the software to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time?" Usability is crucial to the creative process of building anything user-based. If real people can't use our software, then all the hard work of creating it is pointless. [...] In early 2016, GNOME decided to make a major UI update to its Settings application. This visual refresh shifts from an icon-based menu to drop-down lists and adds important changes to several individual Settings panels. The GNOME design team wanted to test these early-stage design changes to see how easily real people could navigate the new GNOME Settings application. Previously, GNOME relied on traditional usability tests, where users explore the software's UI directly. But this wouldn't work, since the software updates hadn't been completed.

FSF, GNU and FSFE

  • LibrePlanet 2018: Let's talk about Freedom. Embedded.
    The call for sessions is open now, until November 2nd, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. Pre-order a LibrePlanet 10th anniversary t-shirt when you register to attend! Do you want to discuss or teach others about a topic relevant to the free software community? You've got until Thursday, November 2nd, 2017 at 10:00 EDT (14:00 UTC) to submit your session proposals. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and everyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, CFP and registration open now
    The call for proposals is open now, until November 2, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and anyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • dot-zed extractor
  • FSFE Newsletter - September 2017

    To push our demand, the FSFE launched a new campaign last week: "Public Money Public Code". The campaign explains the benefits of releasing publicly funded Software under free licences with a short inspiring video and an open letter to sign. Furthermore, the campaign and the open letter will be used in the coming months until the European Parliament election in 2019 to highlight good and bad examples of publicly funded software development and its potential reuse.

  • Free Software Foundation Europe Leads Call For Taxpayer-Funded Software To Be Licensed For Free Re-use
    Considered objectively, it's hard to think of any good reasons why code that is paid for by the public should not be released publicly as a matter of course. The good news is that this "public money, public code" argument is precisely the approach that open access advocates have used with considerable success in the field of academic publishing, so there's hope it might gain some traction in the world of software too.

Security: WordPress 4.8.2, CCleaner 5.33, Apache Patch and Cryptocurrencies

  • WordPress 4.8.2 Security and Maintenance Release
    WordPress 4.8.2 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.
  • Attack on CCleaner Highlights the Importance of Securing Downloads and Maintaining User Trust
    Some of the most worrying kinds of attacks are ones that exploit users’ trust in the systems and softwares they use every day. Yesterday, Cisco’s Talos security team uncovered just that kind of attack in the computer cleanup software CCleaner. Download servers at Avast, the company that owns CCleaner, had been compromised to distribute malware inside CCleaner 5.33 updates for at least a month. Avast estimates that over 2 million users downloaded the affected update. Even worse, CCleaner’s popularity with journalists and human rights activists means that particularly vulnerable users are almost certainly among that number. Avast has advised CCleaner Windows users to update their software immediately. This is often called a “supply chain” attack, referring to all the steps software takes to get from its developers to its users. As more and more users get better at bread-and-butter personal security like enabling two-factor authentication and detecting phishing, malicious hackers are forced to stop targeting users and move “up” the supply chain to the companies and developers that make software. This means that developers need to get in the practice of “distrusting” their own infrastructure to ensure safer software releases with reproducible builds, allowing third parties to double-check whether released binary and source packages correspond. The goal should be to secure internal development and release infrastructure to that point that no hijacking, even from a malicious actor inside the company, can slip through unnoticed.
  • Apache bug leaks contents of server memory for all to see—Patch now
    There's a bug in the widely used Apache Web Server that causes servers to leak pieces of arbitrary memory in a way that could expose passwords or other secrets, a freelance journalist has disclosed. The vulnerability can be triggered by querying a server with what's known as an OPTIONS request. Like the better-known GET and POST requests, OPTIONS is a type of HTTP method that allows users to determine which HTTP requests are supported by the server. Normally, a server will respond with GET, POST, OPTIONS, and any other supported methods. Under certain conditions, however, responses from Apache Web Server include the data stored in computer memory. Patches are available here and here.
  • The Pirate Bay Takes Heat for Testing Monero Mining
    Cryptocurrencies usually are mined with CPU power initially, she told LinuxInsider. Users then find ways to speed up the hashing before going to GPU. They build specialized hardware and field programmable gate array (FPGA) chips to carry out the hashing function in order to mine much faster. [...] The notion that The Pirate Bay effectively would borrow resources from its own users is not the problem, suggested Jessica Groopman, principal analyst at Tractica.

Ubuntu and Linux Mint Development

  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 19 Sep 2017
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter 519
    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #519 for the weeks of September 5 – 18, 2017, and the full version is available here.
  • Ubuntu Desktop default application survey results
    Canonical has released the results of its default applications survey for the 18.04 long-term support release of Ubuntu. The results of the previous survey – for Ubuntu 17.10, dubbed Artful Aardvark – yielded great suggestions, many of which have made their way into the beta version of the operating system. For Ubuntu 18.04, over 15,000 responses were processed by the Ubuntu Desktop team. “The team is now hard at work evaluating many of the suggested applications,” said Canonical.
  • Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” Information Released
    Linux Mint Project Leader Clement Lefebvre, otherwise known as “Clem” released a blog post on Sept. 18, giving some information about the upcoming release of Linux Mint 18.3, dubbed “Sylvia.” In his blog post Lefebvre gave some ideas to some of the pieces of software and changes that will be coming, such as the inclusion of the popular system restoration tool Timeshift. For those of you who haven’t used Timeshift, it’s an application that creates snapshots of your system, and then restores them later, similar to Windows System Restore, or Mac OS’s Time Machine.