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Monday, 23 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

What Microsoft Fears More than Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linux Today: As I attended the sessions at the Open Source Business Conference this week, the rhetoric was very strong--far stranger than anything leveled at The SCO Group when they started their happy litigation hunt years ago. By leveling an allegation on 235 patents that Linux supposedly infringes upon, Microsoft has apparently engendered a reaction in the free and open source software communities the likes of which I personally have never seen.

BeleniX v0.6 LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
OS

Phoronix: The BeleniX LiveCD that is based off of OpenSolaris with GNU applications has reached version 0.6 after some setbacks. While this release is coming out later than expected, it is based upon OpenSolaris Build 60, uses X.Org 7.2, features Compiz 0.5 for Xfce and KDE.

Novell goes public with terms of Microsoft Linux deal

Filed under
SUSE

LinuxWorld: Novell on Friday published redacted versions of the three agreements it signed with Microsoft in its annual 10K filings to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, providing the public with its first detailed look into a deal that some see as critical to the future of Linux. The 10K filing had been delayed by an internal stock options review at Novell, which was concluded Wednesday.

10 Open Source Apps You Can't Live Without

Filed under
Software

intranetjournal: Even for the most seasoned computer user, taking the leap to open source can prove to be a bit daunting. But once you have a solid base of core applications, I believe most people will find the switch is not nearly as painful as they imagined. Here’s a list of open source applications that I feel are a “must have” for anyone interested in exploring open source software alternatives:

Xubuntu Gets Feisty

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

linux devcenter: The third release of Xubuntu, the variant of Ubuntu with the lightweight Xfce desktop, appeared last month. Feisty Fawn (version 7.04) uses the final gold code of Xfce 4.4.0 rather than the release candidates in Edgy Eft (version 6.10) and Dapper Drake (version 6.06). I had very positive experiences with both Edgy and Dapper so I had very high expectations for Xubuntu Feisty Fawn.

Linux: The Case Against Crash Dumps

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In a recent lkml thread the concept of dumping an image of the kernel's memory to swap when the kernel hits a bug was discussed. Linus Torvalds pointed out that such a feature wasn't useful to an operating system like Linux that can ran on such a diverse assortment of computers.

Track MySQL Queries with mysqlsniffer

Filed under
HowTos

the how-to geek: You’ve got a production database server, and you can’t enable query logging… so how do you see the queries being executed against the database?

Ubuntu 7.04 Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Software in Review: Ubuntu Linux continues to show steady improvement with version 7.04, but there's still room for improvement. Despite the handful of shortcomings in 7.04, this is the best release Ubuntu's yet had. If they didn't before, commercial GNU/Linux vendors should now feel quite threatened by Ubuntu Linux.

Monitor bandwidth with vnStat

Filed under
HowTos

techrepublic: Vincent Danen helps you get started using the Linux tool vnStat to monitor your bandwidth usage.

Linux On Your Mind

Information Week blog: It's always informative to look at our most heavily trafficked stories to see what topics you're most interested in. No, it's not a scientific survey, but it certainly provides pretty powerful anecdotal evidence of what technologists are currently buzzing about. And judging from our numbers, you're rather obsessed with Linux--Ubuntu Linux, to be precise.

The Lesser Apps of KDE - Internet

Filed under
KDE

Raiden's Realm: At some point in time, every new user to KDE will find themselves in need of of a way to access at least one, if not several different internet services. KDE comes with a built in selection of some of the most basic internet tools to allow you to do the things you need to do. Here's a short list.

Pimp out your Fonts for Linux

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HowTos

Pimp Your Linux: One of the major things that people request here on Pimpyourlinux is for better fonts on Linux. I’ve done some research on the subject, and it is quite possible to make your Linux Desktop look great, even if you have a flat panel monitor.

Top 8 Linux Games Of 2007

Filed under
Gaming

rangit.com: Below are 8 addictive 3d games for linux users to fill their time with. These games are really good and some have won awards or have been featured on magazines. Most of it is cross platform and free. You don’t have to use ‘Wine’ to be able to play as they come with Linux installers.

In a Galaxy Far, Far Away...

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Watch: If Microsoft isn't the Evil Empire, what should be? It's the 30th anniversary of Star Wars and easy enough to cast Microsoft as destroyer of the Republic. But what if Microsoft were the Republic?

Hugin developer launches photographic distortion correction database

Filed under
Software

Linux.com: The lead developer of the Hugin panorama-stitching application, Pablo d'Angelo, has proposed a new open database for collecting camera lens information that could be used to correct systematic distortion in photographs.

So what’s bloatware anyway, Part III

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Links: Firefox has memory issues. It's undeniable. Keep Firefox for a few hours with some 15-20 tabs opened at a time, minding you own business and you will get Firefox to grab up to around 150MB. You may notice this or not depending on how much memory you have.

GUADEC: GNOME has seventh annual conference

Filed under
Software

ONLamp.com: The GNOME Users And Developers European Conference, a major European free software conference is open for registration for its seventh year. O’Reilly Media is a sponsor. The schedule lists a mind-boggling range of projects.

More Dell/Ubuntu Headlines

  • I ordered my Dell with Ubuntu and saved $140.00

  • The Dell PC price challenge – Windows Vista versus Ubuntu
  • Dell Ubuntu Linux has arrived

Some Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Printer In VIM

  • Audio Preview in Nautilus
  • Pod::POM::Web

Transferring files with gFTP

Filed under
HowTos

Linux.com: gFTP is a complete, easy-to-use file transfer tool for the Linux desktop. In spite of its name, gFTP can transfer files using more than standard File Transfer Protocol; it provides several features that make it more than just another FTP client.

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More in Tux Machines

Google seeks dev feedback for putting AI on Raspberry Pi

Google will bring its AI and machine learning technology to the Raspberry Pi this year, and has posted a survey seeking input. Google is planning to deliver tools for the Raspberry Pi later this year built around its artificial intelligence and machine learning technology, according to a Raspberry Pi Foundation blog entry. The announcement links to a Google survey that seeks to determine what kind of tools RPi developers would find most useful. Read more

Hands-On: Installing openSUSE Tumbleweed, Manjaro, and Debian GNU/Linux on my new notebook

In my previous post about installing Linux on my new, very low-priced laptop (the Asus X540S), I went through the initial setup of Windows 10 Home. My first impressions of the laptop were very mixed. The size and weight are nice, but the overall construction doesn't feel very good. The case feels like very thin plastic, the keyboard doesn't feel good at all, it has a particularly cheesy version of the dreaded "clickpad" (a touchpad with integrated buttons), and the power connection didn't feel very stable. Read more

Rugged, compact IoT gateway runs Linux on Apollo Lake

Axiomtek’s DIN-rail ready “ICO100-839” IoT controller offers an Atom x5-E3930, 8-bit DIO, mini-PCIe, mSATA, extended temp support, and a compact footprint. The ICO100-839 is one of the first embedded computers to use Intel’s recent “Apollo Lake” generation of 14nm-fabricated Atom SoCs. Like the Advantech UTX-3117, the fanless ICO100-839 is referred to as an IoT gateway, and runs on a dual-core Atom X5-E3930 clocked from 1.3GHz to 1.8GHz. The ICO100-839, which is also called an industrial IoT controller, is a stripped down, but updated version of the Bay Trail Atom based ICO300 DIN-rail controller. Last year, the ICO300 was followed by an almost identical ICO300-MI gateway, which added Intel IoT Gateway Technology and Wind River Intelligent Device Platform software. Read more

today's leftovers

  • GoboLinux 016
    GoboLinux is available for 64-bit x86 computers exclusively. The ISO I downloaded for GoboLinux 016 was 958MB in size. Booting from the installation media brings up a text-based menu system where we are asked to select our preferred language from a list of six European languages. We are then asked to select our keyboard's layout from another list. At this point, the system drops us to a command prompt where we are logged in as the root user. The default shell is zsh. A welcome message lets us know we can run the startx command to launch a desktop environment or run the Installer command to begin installing the distribution.
  • Solus Linux Working On A Flatpak-Based, Optimized Steam Runtime
    The Solus Linux developers have been working on their "Linux Steam Integration" for Steam and improvements around the Steam runtime, with this being one of the distributions interested in good Linux performance and making use of some Clear Linux optimizations, while their next step is looking at Flatpak-packaging up of libraries needed by the Steam runtime to fork a Flatpak-happy Linux gaming setup.
  • It’s ‘Best Linux Distro’ Time Again
    It’s time to start the process of choosing the FOSS Force Reader’s Choice Award winner for Best Desktop Linux Distro for 2016. This is the third outing for our annual poll, which began in a March, 2015 contest that was won by Ubuntu, which bested runner-up Linux Mint by only 11 votes. Last year we moved the voting up to January, in a contest which saw Arch Linux as the overall winner, with elementary OS in second place. Just like last year, this year’s polling will be a two round process. The first round, which began early Friday afternoon when the poll quietly went up on our front page, is a qualifying round. In this round, we’re offering a field of 19 of the top 20 distros on Distrowatch’s famous “Page Hit Ranking” list. Those whose favorite distro isn’t on the list shouldn’t worry — your distro’s not out of the game yet. Below the poll there’s a place to write-in any distro that’s not in the poll to be tallied for possible inclusion in the second and final round of polling to follow.
  • Tracktion NAMM 2017 Preview [Ed: Raspberry Pi with Ubuntu]
  • Snapdragon 410E SBC offers long lifecycle support at $85
    The Linux/Android-ready Inforce 6309L is a cheaper version of the DragonBoard 410c-like Inforce 6309. It sacrifices GbE and LVDS, but has 10-year support. Inforce Computing has released a more affordable and slightly less feature rich version of its commercial-oriented, circa-2015 Inforce 6309 SBC. Like the Inforce 6309, the new Inforce 6309L has the same 85 x 54mm footprint and much the same feature set as Arrow’s Qualcomm-backed, community-backed DragonBoard 410c SBC. It also offers the same Linux and Android BSPs used by the DragonBoard 410c, one of the first SBCs to adopt Linaro’s 96Boards form-factor.
  • It’s time to spring-clean your IT contracts
    The start of a new year is a time for review and planning, in business, as well as in our personal lives. It’s likely that you will be focused on finalising your company’s objectives and strategy for the year ahead. But it’s also important to consider whether the tools and processes that you have in place remain fit for purpose – and that includes your contract templates and contractual risk and compliance processes. When it comes to the law, “the only thing that is constant is change”. Without fail, each year brings the introduction of new legislation, case law and regulatory guidance that may have an impact on your contracts – whether it’s the terms of use or privacy policy for your website or app, or the contract terms that you use when supplying or purchasing technology services. Therefore, it’s important to carry out a regular review of your contract terms (and any existing contracts) to make sure that they remain compliant with law and are future-proofed as much as possible in terms of new legal and regulatory developments that you know are around the corner.
  • Chinese investors buy owner of PCWorld, IDC
    International Data Group, the owner of PCWorld magazine, several other tech journals and the IDC market research organisation, has been bought by two Chinese investors. China Oceanwide Holdings Group and IDG Capital (no affiliate of IDG) have paid between US$500 million and US$1 billion for IDG sans its high-performance computing research businesses. The two Chinese entities had made separate bids but were told by investment banker Goldman Sachs to join hands. The sale of IDG has been cleared by the US Committee on Foreign Investment and should be completed by end of the first quarter this year. China Oceanwide Holdings Group, founded by chairman Zhiqiang Lu, is active in financial services, real estate, technology, and media among others.