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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Review: PcLinuxOS 2007

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

Raiden's Realm: A lot of the greatest hype in the Linux world has been around Ubuntu and its derivatives, namely Kubuntu, Edubuntu and the like. However, there's yet another contender in the Linux world that has been making a lot of noise and is worth a good hard look. Enter PcLinuxOS.

The Road to KDE 4: KWin Composite Brings Bling to KDE

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: KWin, KDE's window manager, has been around since KDE 2.0 (replacing KWM in KDE 1.x) and has grown to be a mature and stable window manager over the years. For KDE 4, however, there were a few people rumbling about visual effects, and perhaps KWin was feeling a little envious of its younger cousins Compiz and Beryl.

Are Linux vendors predatory?

Filed under
Linux

Dana Blankenhorn: I want to continue our discussion about penguins as predators by talking about Covalent. Covalent’s business is supporting open source projects. Today Covalent added support for nine new Apache technologies to its roster and it’s expanding. Is it being predatory?

Is the world ready for Ubuntu’s six month release cycle?

Filed under
Ubuntu

ArsGeek: With Ubuntu hitting the main stream (don’t argue with me, being sold by Dell is about as mainstream as you can get) I’ve been thinking about their constant upgrade/release cycle among other potential obstacles that may stand in the way of more widespread adoption of my favorite operating system.

Customize Your Shell

Filed under
News

You can customize the UNIX shell to save time, to save typing, and to adapt to your style of work. Shell startup files capture your preferences and recreate your shell environment session after session, even machine to machine.

Firefox 2.0.0.4 and 1.5.0.12 Released (End-of-Life for 1.5.x)

Filed under
Moz/FF

CyberNetNews: Today is a big day for Mozilla because it marks the last version of Firefox 1.5 that will ship. This last release was definitely necessary though since Mozilla had never prompted 1.5.x users to upgrade to Firefox 2, but that is about to change.

60 days with Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Batteries Not Included: I have been using Ubuntu for approximately 2 months now. This has been a fairly monogamous relationship, I think I booted Windows all of twice. So, what does it feel like?

It's Wedding Season, and OpenOffice.org Is Here For You

Filed under
OOo

OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas: Who wants to pay for someone else to make your wedding invitations? (Or programs, or whatever.) Use OpenOffice for your wedding invitations. This of course prompts the objection, "But there aren't any templates in OpenOffice."

Short Overview: Current State of Mesa and OpenGL on Linux

Filed under
Software

/home/liquidat: Most free X.Org graphic drivers are based on Mesa, which is a free OpenGL specification implementation. However, while OpenGL is already in Version 2.1 the Mesa implementation only supports version 1.5. This is to change soon - but OpenGL will make new releases as well.

A New Vector For Hackers -- Firefox Add-Ons

Filed under
Security

Washington Post: Makers of some of the most popular extensions, or "add-ons," for Mozilla's Firefox Web browser may have inadvertently introduced security holes that criminals could use to steal sensitive data from millions of users.

nBox - Envision your network with nBox (Embedded Ntop)

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HowTos

The life of a systems or network administrator requires us to maintain an expansive understanding of our network infrastructure to more effectively manage it.

Comparing GNU/Linux and FreeBSD

Filed under
OS

Free Software Mag: GNU/Linux is the most popular operating system built with free/open source software. However, it is not the only one: FreeBSD is also becoming popular for its stability, robustness and security. In this article, I’ll take a look at their similarities and differences.

Installing Liberation fonts on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

tectonic: Red Hat recently released a set of free fonts designed to be a metrically-exact replacement for the Microsoft Core TrueType fonts. Installing fonts on Linux, however, has not always been the easiest of tasks so Tectonic dug around a little to make a simple guide to installing these, and other, fonts on most flavours of Linux.

Kiosktool locks down KDE users' desktops

Filed under
KDE

linux.com: Recently I wrote about locking down the GNOME desktop environment with Pessulus. In this article, I'll show you how to do the same for KDE, using Kiosktool, a front end for changing the KDE configuration files in users' home folders and the /etc/kde* folders.

Trickle: A lightweight userspace bandwidth shaper.

Filed under
Software

DPotD: Sometimes, you’ll want to download something but you don’t want it to completely saturate your Internet connection. Perhaps you’re already downloading something more important, or you simply don’t want to get in the way of other people that are sharing the same Internet connection. Enter Trickle.

openSUSE to compete with Edubuntu?

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

ZDNet: At first blush, the new offering, with a proposed release this fall, appears to have the makings of a serious competitor. Designed as an add-on “EDU-CD” to accompany the upcoming 10.3 release of openSUSE, the so-called “SLEducator” is designed to “[ease] the installation and configuration of an educational network and student desktop.

Kernel space: On-demand readahead

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: "Readahead" is the act of speculatively reading a portion of a file's contents into memory in the expectation that a process working with that file will soon want that data. When readahead works well, a data-consuming process will find that the information it needs is available to it when it asks, and that waiting for disk I/O is not necessary.

Making Debian packages from commercial software

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: One of my main goals for a managed infrastructure is to make sure I have consistent versions of end-user applications installed everywhere. It was time to make Debian-style packages of the big, expensive third-party stuff.

Owning computers via spelling mistakes

Filed under
Security

infoworld: Symantec researchers have detailed a painfully simple attack method that hackers may already be using to bypass security protections and break into UNIX and Linux-based computers.

Satisfying the Vocal Minority - Why it Matters

Filed under
Ubuntu

pronetadvertising: Though the move may not 'directly' result in a significant amount of sales, from a marketing perspective this will help momentously in terms of getting Dell's name out there.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.

Arch Linux News

  • Linux Top 3: Arch Anywhere, Bitkey and Vinux
    Arch Linux is a powerful rolling Linux distribution, that hasn't always been particularly easy for new users to install and deploy. The goal of the Arch Anywhere system is to provide new and old users with the ability to install a fully custom Arch Linux system in minutes.
  • Arch Linux Preparing To Deprecate i686 Support
    Arch Linux is moving ahead with preparing to deprecate i686 (x86 32-bit) support in their distribution. Due to declining usage of Arch Linux i686, they will be phasing out official support for the architecture. Next month's ISO spin will be the last for offering a 32-bit Arch Linux install. Following that will be a nine month deprecation period where i686 packages will still see updates.
  • News draft for i686 deprecation
    Finally found some time to write a draft for news post on i686. Here it is: Title: i686 is dead, long live i686 Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that February ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Arch Linux. The next 9 months are deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging and repository tools will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported. However, as there is still some interest in keeping i686 alive, we would like to encourage the community to make it happen with our guidance. Depending on the demand, an official channel and mailing list will be created for second tier architectures.

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.