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Saturday, 22 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 519 srlinuxx 05/08/2013 - 1:54pm
Story today's highlights: srlinuxx 05/08/2013 - 4:37am
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 04/08/2013 - 11:11pm
Story Ubuntu 13.10 Update Finally Fixes Ugly Nautilus, GNOME 3 Apps srlinuxx 1 04/08/2013 - 12:05am
Story GNOME 3.9.5 Development Release srlinuxx 03/08/2013 - 11:17pm
Story Advanced Text Editors Compared: kate vs gedit srlinuxx 03/08/2013 - 11:15pm
Story OS4 OpenLinux 13.6 Review: XFCE spin with a difference srlinuxx 03/08/2013 - 11:13pm
Story Debian Displaces Ubuntu In Page Hits srlinuxx 03/08/2013 - 11:05pm
Story Unix: Getting from here to there (routing basics) srlinuxx 03/08/2013 - 9:54pm
Story How Cory Doctorow Gets Around srlinuxx 03/08/2013 - 9:52pm

XP to Ubuntu Linux and back again

Filed under
OS

james.cooley.ie: My ideal situation is to be able to move from machine to machine (XP or Linux) by inserting a reasonably sized usb-drive, type a couple of commands and start working productively.

ATI/AMD's New Open-Source Strategy Explained

Filed under
OSS

phoronix: Yesterday when talking about the new ATI Linux driver, AMD's press release had stated: "In the coming months AMD also plans to accelerate efforts to address the needs of the open source community as well." A few hints were dropped yesterday, but what we didn't tell you is that the announcement wouldn't be in a few months, but really just a few hours.

GNOME 2.20.0 RC Released

Filed under
Software

Linux Electrons: This is the ninth development release and first release candidate for GNOME 2.20.0, which will be released later this month. This release is the last before hard code freeze starts on september 10th. Please test this as much as you can and file bugs if you want them fixed before the final release.

KDE 4.0 Beta 2 Release

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Community proudly presents the second Beta release for KDE 4.0. This release marks the beginning of the feature freeze and the stabilization of the current codebase. Since the libraries were frozen with the first Beta, KDE developers have been adding features and functionality to their applications. Now it is time to start polishing these features

Xorg Releases/7.3

Features Xorg server 1.4, New applications: xbacklight, New drivers: xf86-video-glide, xf86-video-vermilion, and xdm: Xft support added.

Upcoming Open Source Conferences

Filed under
OSS

infoworld blogs: There's a slew of open source conferences coming up this fall in the US and in Europe. Here are a few of the highlights:

Second Release Candidate for GIMP 2.4

Filed under
GIMP

GIMP 2.4.0-RC2 is finally there. The developers have fixed quite some bugs since RC1 but it's not the final thing yet.

2 minutes about Copernic

Filed under
MDV

beranger: Dear Mandriva friends, your distro runs rather well and smoothly even as RC1 but it's such a bloat that I'll do my best to educate myself to that point that I'd eventually only use some BSD flavor(s) at home!

Game of the Day: Hexen

Filed under
Gaming

Penguin Pete: Following on from my recent exploration of Heretic, I next tried Hexen. This has been motivated by my curiosity; while we've all played Doom and Quake to death, these two interim games just never seemed to get the press. Hexen, too, runs smoothly in DOSbox on my Slackware setup.

PC-BSD Day 1: extending the system

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: On this first day with PC-BSD I sat down to extend the system. For one, I was curious whether I could play my MP3 files out of the box and -if not- how easy it was to remedy that. Secondly, I wanted to install a program for offline blogging.

Xubuntu 7.04 on a 450Mhz K6-2, 256Mb

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: Well, after an egregiously long time, I seem to have finally finished installing Xubuntu 7.04 on the World’s Ugliest Laptop, and the results are … well, I’ll let you judge.

Linux: The Really Simple Really Fair Scheduler

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In an effort to fully understand the math proposed by Roman Zippel in his Really Fair Scheduler, Ingo Molnar implemented a simplified version of the logic on top of his Completely Fair Scheduler code which he then humorously labeled the Really Simple Really Fair Scheduler.

The shell challenge: changing another process’ working directory

Filed under
HowTos

rudd-o: Don’t you hate it when you leave a shell open and you can’t unmount a disk volume because the shell has a firm grip on a directory in that disk? Well, there’s a solution.

ISO approval: comparing ODF to OOXML

Filed under
OSS

masuran.org: I recently got into a discussion with some OOXML backers about whether or not OOXML can/should be made an ISO standard. To support my argument that the OOXML specification can't be fixed with a BRM, I've decided to compare the comments that were addressed at the ODF BRM and the ones that will have to be addressed at the OOXML BRM.

Configuring your webcam to work under Linux

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: If you want the old-time GNU/Linux experience, try configuring a Web camera. Unlike most peripherals, webcams are generally not configured during installation. Moreover, where printers have the Common Unix Printing System (CUPS) and its interfaces, with webcams you are generally thrown back on whatever resources you can find on the Internet and your own knowledge of kernel modules and drivers.

Automatix Backlash: Why the Hate?

Filed under
Software

OSWeekly: In order for Automatix to be as hated as it has become by a select few, we need to first examine the reasons why the application is allegedly being targeted with such harsh words. With this article, we will closely examine why.

First impressions: Opera 9.5 alpha a worthy contender

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: Opera has always defied conventional wisdom: in the past, the company was able to survive by selling web browsers when Microsoft and Netscape were giving them away. More recently, the company shifted to giving away its desktop browser. Now, the company has released alpha builds of the latest version of their desktop product, Opera 9.5.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • My Favorite Open Source Business Models

  • Linux is Alright
  • Open source acquisitions, time to grow up?
  • PhpGedView puts your ancestors on the Web
  • Ian Murdock: Where's the War?
  • GP2X-F200 Video
  • Time to Show More Oxygen
  • GPLv3 up 19% over last week
  • Layers of Ubuntu

Snort on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

Filed under
HowTos

searchsecurity.techtarget: Intrusion detection and intrusion prevention systems (IDS and IPS, respectively) provide the ability to inspect and analyse network traffic and either generate alerts or drop traffic in the event that an attack or a malicious event is detected. We're going to demonstrate.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • MAC address packet filtering using IPTables

  • A Couple Ways to Debug mod_rewrite
  • A nifty little trick for Openbox Arch
  • Howto: Openfire - Ubuntu 6.06 LTS LAMP
  • Making an Ubuntu Server - Part 1: The Plan
  • Which interface is eth0?
  • Tree view of directories and file listings from command line
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • GNU Guile 2.2.1 released
    We are happy to announce GNU Guile release 2.2.1, the first bug-fix release in the new 2.2 stable release series.
  • Announcing Nylas Mail 2.0 [Ed: just Electron]
  • Cerebro Is An Amazing Open Source OS X Spotlight Alternative For Linux [Ed: also just Electron]
    You may be fed up with traditional way of searching/opening applications on your system. Cerebro is an amazing utility built using Electron and available for Linux, Windows, and Mac. It is open-source and released under MIT license.
  • Flowblade Another Video Editor for Linux? Give It A Try!
    You may have favorite video editor to edit your videos but there is no harm to try something new, its initial release was not that long, with time it made some great improvements. It can be bit hard to master this video editor but if you are not new in this field you can make it easily and will be total worth of time.
  • Get System Info from CLI Using `NeoFetch` Tool in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Ukuu Kernel Manager Utility lets You Upgrade or Install Kernels in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are many ways to upgrade your Linux Kernel using Synaptics, command line and so. The Ukuu utility is the simply solution to manager your Ubuntu/Linux Mint kernels. If you want to test new fixes in the Linux Kernel then you can install Mainline Kernels released by Ubuntu team but mainline Kernels are intended to use for testing purposes only (so be careful).
  • 10 Reasons Why You Should Use Vi/Vim Text Editor in Linux
    While working with Linux systems, there are several areas where you’ll need to use a text editor including programming/scripting, editing configuration/text files, to mention but a few. There are several remarkable text editors you’ll find out there for Linux-based operating systems.
  • OpenShot 2.3 Linux Video Editor New Features
    It’s been quite some time since we last talked about OpenShot, and more specifically when it had its second major release. Recently, the team behind the popular open source video editor has made its third point release available which happens to come with a couple of exciting new features and tools, so here is a quick guide on where to find them and how to use them.
  • Boostnote: Another Great Note Taking App for Developers? Find Out By Yourself
    Boostnote is an open-source note-taking application especially made for programmers and developers, it is build up with Electron framework and cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Being programmers, we take lots of notes which includes commands, code snippets, bug information and so on. It all comes in handy when you have organized them all in one place, Boostnote does this job very well. It lets you organize your notes in folders with tags, so you can find anything you are looking for very quickly.
  • Collabora Office 5.3 Released
    Today we released Collabora Office 5.3 and Collabora GovOffice 5.3, which contain great new features and enhancements. They also contains all fixes from the upstream libreoffice-5-3 branch and several backported features.

Virtualization and Containers

GNOME News

today's howtos