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About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Hacked to Serve Malware srlinuxx 26/09/2011 - 10:06pm
Story A Tale of Two Betas srlinuxx 26/09/2011 - 7:42pm
Story Linus Torvalds’s Lessons on Software Development Management srlinuxx 26/09/2011 - 7:41pm
Story 10 Ksplash Screen Themes For KDE 4.x srlinuxx 26/09/2011 - 7:38pm
Story Linux users, start your engines srlinuxx 26/09/2011 - 7:33pm
Story Fighting the Schism of Free Software srlinuxx 1 26/09/2011 - 7:06pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 424 srlinuxx 26/09/2011 - 5:14pm
Story Mandriva 2011 Hydrogen Reviewed srlinuxx 26/09/2011 - 5:10pm
Story Three Magnifiques Extensions to Sweeten Your Office Suite srlinuxx 26/09/2011 - 5:02pm
Story Still Struggles To Return srlinuxx 26/09/2011 - 4:57pm

KDE vs. GNOME: What I Will Miss And Where

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A current mania is to exile yourself for a certain period of time into the rival desktop environment, to see how bad (or not) you would feel: a KDE fan would use GNOME, while a GNOME guy would use KDE. I have undertaken the challenge myself, and it wasn't bad at all.

Suse 10.2, part 12: Getting WMV video to work in Firefox, adding VLC

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After getting Windows Media Video (WMV) to successfully play within Firefox on Ubuntu 7.04, I attempted to achieve the same functionality within Suse 10.2. I pretty much succeeded.

FreeBSD 6.2 review

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It's been a long road to recovery, but after years of mediocre releases, and months of delays in the development process, FreeBSD is finally back on its feet with 6.2-RELEASE. Though it is an excellent operating system, it can never hope to compete with commercial GNU/Linux distributions for desktop computers.

Recent GNOME panel apps

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The basic set of GNOME panel apps ranges from the practical, such as clocks and system monitors, to the mildly amusing, but apparently too traditional to dispense with, such as Fish. However, in the last few years, an increasing number of GNOME applications are being designed to fit into the panel.

3D modeling on the cheap - Blender

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I’ve always wanted to become better at 3D modeling ever since both my senior project as well as after finding out how cool graphics are going to be in desktop applications like Windows DreamScene as well as Beryl, but getting a 3D modeler for less than $300 is pretty tricky.

Hey dude, you're getting Linux on that Dell

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After collecting some 1,800 new product and service ideas from IT users and customers using an online "suggestion box," Dell Inc. has announced that it's taking the user suggestions seriously and will soon debut and sell a new line of certified, user-ready Linux-loaded desktop and laptop computers.

To sudo or not to sudo

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Sudo is a simple program which allows the administrator to give regular users extra permissions to execute the commands they would normally not be allowed to use. Thanks to sudo, we can execute commands that are usually restricted to the root account. In order to use sudo you need to configure it properly. This FAQ is supposed to help you with this task.

X-Plane - Advanced Flight Simulator For Linux PCs

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If you always wanted to fly but were held back by the expense and risks of flying real airplanes, you may want to give X-Plane a try. It is one of most advanced flight simulator software packages for personal computers and includes complete scenery of the planets Earth and Mars.

FOSDEM - Day 1

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Ahh, today was a lot of fun at FOSDEM 2007 Smiling In the morning, I first went to the talk about software patents, then the One Laptop Per Child talk (really nifty stuff) and then the liberating java one. Then I wandered around a while at the KDE booth waiting for the afternoon talks to start.

Show us the Code Campaign

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It's come to many's attention you have claimed again and again, that Linux violates Microsoft's intellectual property. Not only that, but it's been reported Microsoft has convinced businesses to pay for a Linux patent that you can't provide.

The Impact Of A Tickless Kernel

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This will be short and sweet. In this article we will be looking at the impact of CONFIG_NO_HZ/Dynamic Ticks, which will be found in the Linux 2.6.21 kernel. The end-user benefit is cooler-running processors and increased power savings.

Linux Software Installation, Part III: Needs & Wants

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The typical Linux way of providing binaries faces huge problems: First of all, “trying new things” means installing new software just released in a new milestone release or just released first time at all. Repositories need quite some time to react to such changes due to rules about new release or due to the time the package maintainer needs to get familiar with the new release. Therefore in such a case the user is lost with Linux.

13 Things to do immediately after installing Ubuntu

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In this article i describe some of the things to do immediately after installing ubuntu on your machine . Since most of the people reading this would be shifting from Windows to Linux with a system dual booting so i would focus more on making transition easy from Windows to Linux.

An Ubuntu community legacy:

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Years ago I started as Debian user, but when I tried to help with the project I had a lot of problems. Someday appeared Ubuntu, I started to use it and so easy (and quick) I became part of the project. What is the big difference between Debian and Ubuntu? THE COMMUNITY!

A vista of Apples, penguins and more

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Let me share a tale of woe on how worlds collide. I gave up trying to use 2 different Vista Release Candidates during 2006; I couldn't get openVPN to work. Instead, I went and installed a Linux desktop.

Wot! Not Vista?

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My daughter and her cousins fired up the computer and started "chatting" to them through MSN. A guest, who was glancing over their shoulders while doing this, decided to show off his knowledge of computers and said "Ah – I see you have got Vista then..." No I had not.

Ubuntu 7.04 Alpha - CNN (WMV) streaming video success

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As another example of what I've missed, and how much Ubuntu has progressed, I was able to watch CNN videos for the first time on a Linux distribution. It's a feature I don't even have on any of my Suse installations. So what?

An Explanation of Pointers (C++)

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Pointers are basically the same as any other variable. However, what is different about them is that instead of containing actual data, they contain a pointer to the memory location where information can be found. This is a very important concept, and many programs and ideas rely on pointers as the basis of their design, linked lists for example.

One Laptop Per Child kicks off PyCON 2007

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This year’s Python Convention [1], being held this weekend in Dallas Texas, started off with an inspiring presentation by an engineer from the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project [2] (Ivan Krstić) , showing off the hardware features of the new “OLPC XO 1” prototype, as well as some “dangerous ideas” about its software design: a large part of the user space code for the laptops will be i

More Krita News

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Krita progress over the past few months has been slower than I’d have liked, for a couple of reasons: porting to Qt4 was quite hard. But! Banish the gloom! There are some really cool and interesting developments. Not only have we got a most impressive ToDo, sometimes items even get done! I already mentioned the flake integration. But there’s more…

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.