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Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux Desktop Gets a New (X) Face

Filed under
Software

The term Linux desktop is a bit of misnomer since there are actually many Linux desktop environments, including KDE and GNOME. Xfce 4.4 is now available.

Open source lobby fury over Office format fast-track

Filed under
OSS

Two leading open standards bodies claim Microsoft's new Office XML formats are being 'fast tracked' into official European ISO/IEC standards without due consideration.

openSUSE Build Service goes Open Source

Filed under
SUSE

The openSUSE team announced today the open sourcing of our openSUSE Build Service (OBS). We believe that it is not only important to release an excellent Open Source distribution but also create it in an open way with Open Source tools together with the openSUSE community. Releasing the build service as Open Source makes the complete project build on Open Source.

Automatic package update nagging with apticron

Filed under
HowTos

Do you need your machines to automatically alert you when new packages are available? apticron might be just the package you've been looking for.

What is this ar program thingy?

Filed under
HowTos

Travelling through the mysterious and wonderful world of the linux file system we come across a program called "ar" and we think to ourselves, "What is this 'ar' program thingy?". It sounds like a pirates exclamation but it is actually a very important program.

The State of the Union of FOSS

Filed under
OSS

Confidential White House sources have leaked to me a secretly included draft section of the President’s State of the Union address. These sources suspect that the Free Software Foundation (FSF), a suspected terrorist group, somehow gained access to the speech and included this section. It was purportedly caught at the last moment by a staffer who was literate enough to understand what she was reading. I release this copy of the rejected section, exposing myself to potentially grave peril, as a public service to our readers.

Linux Audio Players, Tested and Graded

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Software

One longstanding Unix tradition is best summed up thus: "Write programs that do one thing and do it well. Write programs to work together." On a Linux machine, this philosophy is most clearly visible from the command line. I use my main Linux desktop for a lot of things, but music-related activities are key. While visiting my family back home, I encountered Windows Media Player 11 and Apple's iTunes. I began to wonder if there were an all-in-one music application for Linux that I could love.

How not to release a live DVD game

Filed under
Linux

I was intrigued when I heard about SuperGamer, a beta live DVD based on PCLinuxOS. The DVD includes, in demo version for the most part, 3-D shooters America's Army, Doom 3, Postal 2, Cube, Enemy Territory, Nexuiz, Quake 4, Soldier of Fortune, UFO: Alien Invasion, and Wesnoth. Unfortunately, my SuperGamer/PCLinuxOS experience was as bad a Linux experience as I can remember having.

Sauerbraten - Cube 2 Based Free Multiplayer First Person Shooter

Filed under
Gaming

Sauerbraten is a popular free and open source computer game for Linux. It is a "First Person Shooter" game, that is, when you play it you see the world of the game from the perspective of the character that you control, giving you the impression of moving in the 3-dimensional space created by the game. The main activity of this character is running around in a fantastic world and shooting enemies or evil creatures.

War of words between aid organization and OLPC erupts

Filed under
OLPC

A war of words has erupted through email channels between Scandinavian-based aid organization FAIR and Dr Nicholas Negroponte of the One Latop Per Child (OLPC) project.

Tips and Tricks for Linux Admins: The State of the Tiny

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

There is a distinct sub-culture in the Unix-type operating universe made up of gnarly old geekbeards who were raised up in the green-screen command-prompt era. They think X Window is for amateurs. These are the wizened gurus who take pride at keeping antique hardware in service. Throw away an old 386 or 486? Never. Me, I have a life. So let's take a look at some of the small form-factor devices that we can stuff Linux into.

Kernel Space: State of the Nouveau project

Filed under
Software

While NVidia refuses to release programming information for its video chipsets, one ambitious project is reverse engineering the hardware to develop open source support.

Control machines with your machine

Filed under
HowTos

This article is intended for new Linux users who wish to use their Linux-box for some real work. Speed control of an industrial motor? Sounds complicated? It’s not as complex an affair as it sounds. What’s interesting is that a PC powered with a Linux based Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) can be used to control anything from a small motor to a complex industrial drive with the utmost reliability.

5 Tips to Install Ubuntu From Windows

Filed under
HowTos

A great new prototype had been making the front page of a lot of publication recently. All the fuzz is about the new Ubuntu installer Windows based installer for Ubuntu. What’s the catch? The news was so over the place and the installer in such a bad shape that a lot of people could be discouraged.

The Road to KDE 4: Job Progress Reimagined

Filed under
KDE

Have you ever had your taskbar filled with 10 applications all doing something that involved waiting for a task to finish? Document Printing Progress, a K3b CD burning dialogue, Audio Encoding via KAudioCreator, File Transfers in Konqueror, Kopete, KTorrent, checking email in KMail... The new Jobs support in KDE 4 will unify the display of progress for these tasks, making it easy to see and manage what is happening on your system.

Tip of the Trade: apt-proxy

Filed under
HowTos

If you're running more than one Debian or Ubuntu computer on your network, you can speed up downloads and updates considerably by using a local package mirror. Packages need only be downloaded once to be available to all of your local clients.

The Open Source Initiative still lives

Filed under
OSS

There was a time when the OSI (Open Source Initiative) was one of the hotbeds of open source activity. After the retirement of its co-founder and leader, Eric S. Raymond, in January 2005, the OSI lost much of its fire. That may be changing soon, though.

Small businesses are ripe for free software

Filed under
OSS

Once upon a time, in a career far, far away, I worked for a very small business. I was tasked with upgrading the OLD PC’s. The budget was so miniscule that literally every penny counted. In the effort to get the best bang for the buck, I stumbled across these programs called free software. “Whoo-hoo, they’re free” I thought. Little knowing how that introduction to free software applications would change my life.

OpenOffice, Office 2007 get new tools

Filed under
OOo

Rivals Microsoft Corp. and OpenOffice.org on Tuesday both released toolkits that support building applications for their competing document file formats and productivity suites.

OpenOffice.org's toolkit allows developers to add the ability to save documents in Open Document Format for Office Applications (ODF) to a variety of applications.

OLPC: yet another bad idea

Filed under
OLPC

There are plenty of misguided projects which people in the West undertake, under the mistaken impression that they are helping those in the underdeveloped regions of the world.

The One Laptop Per Child initiative, a brainwave of MIT's Nicholas Negroponte, is just the latest in a long line. When you throw in fancy phrases like "bridging the digital divide" the publicity is ensured.

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More in Tux Machines

Software and Games

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat, Logicalis in digital transformation partnership in Latin America
    PromonLogicalis, a provider of information technology and communication solutions and services in Latin America, and Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, announced a collaboration that aim to help organizations navigate the digital transformation of their infrastructures to pave the way for cloud and the software-defined technologies, and to advance open source technology awareness in the region. Open source is delivering significant advancements in many areas of technology through community-powered innovation, including cloud computing, mobile, big data, and more. And, as companies embrace modern technology as a competitive advantage via digital transformation efforts, many are turning to open source because of the flexibility and agility it can enable.
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Downgraded by Zacks Investment Research to “Hold”
  • An Easy Way To Try Intel & RADV Vulkan Drivers On Fedora 24
    Fedora 25 should have good support for the open-source Vulkan Linux drivers (particularly if it lands the next Mesa release) while Fedora 24 users can now more easily play with the latest Mesa Git RADV and Intel ANV Vulkan drivers via a new repository. A Phoronix reader has setup a Fedora Copr repository that is building Intel's Vulkan driver from Mesa Git plus the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver re-based from its source (David Airlie's semi-interesting GitHub branch). Fedora COPR, for the uninformed, is the distribution's equivalent to Ubuntu PPA repositories.
  • Meeting users, lots of users
    Every year, I introduce Fedora to new students at Brno Technical University. There are approx. 500 of them and a sizable amount of them then installs Fedora. We also organize a sort of installfest one week after the presentation where anyone who has had any difficulties with Fedora can come and ask for help. It’s a great opportunity to observe what things new users struggle with the most. Especially when you have such a high number of new users. What are my observations this year?

Linux Devices

  • 96Boards SBCs host Intel Joule and Curie IoT modules
    Gumstix announced two SBCs this week, based on Intel Joule and Curie IoT modules and built to 96Boards CE and IE form-factor specifications, respectively. At Linaro Connect Las Vegas 2016, where earlier this week Linaro’s 96Boards.org announced a new 96Boards IoT Edition (IE) spec, Gumstix announced support for 96Boards.org’s open SBC standards with two new single-board computers. Both SBCs will be available for purchase in October.
  • ORWL — First Open Source And Physically Secure PC, Runs Linux And Windows
    ORWL is the first open source, physically secure computer. Using a secure microcontroller (MCU) and an ‘active clamshell mesh’, the device makes sure that nobody breaks the security of the system. Its maker, Design Shift, has also launched a crowdfunding campaign on Crowd Supply.
  • Purism Is Still Hoping To Build A GNU/Linux Free Software Librem Smartphone
    Purism, the startup behind the Librem laptops with a focus on free software and user privacy/freedom, still has their minds set on coming up with a GNU/Linux smartphone. Purism continues selling their high-priced laptops and their Librem 11 is forthcoming as an Intel-based tablet/convertible device with stocking station. Next on their horizon they want to produce "the ideal no-carrier, Free Software phone running a bona fide GNU+Linux stack."

Leftovers: OSS

  • Asterisk 14 Improves Open-Source VoIP
    Digium, the lead commercial sponsor behind the Asterisk open source PBX project announced the release Asterisk 14 this week, continuing to evolve the decade old effort, making it easier to use and deploy.
  • Yahoo open-sources a deep learning model for classifying pornographic images
    Yahoo today announced its latest open-source release: a model that can figure out if images are specifically pornographic in nature. The system uses a type of artificial intelligence called deep learning, which involves training artificial neural networks on lots of data (like dirty images) and getting them to make inferences about new data. The model that’s now available on GitHub under a BSD 2-Clause license comes pre-trained, so users only have to fine-tune it if they so choose. The model works with the widely used Caffe open source deep learning framework. The team trained the model using its now open source CaffeOnSpark system. The new model could be interesting to look at for developers maintaining applications like Instagram and Pinterest that are keen to minimize smut. Search engine operators like Google and Microsoft might also want to check out what’s under the hood here. “To the best of our knowledge, there is no open source model or algorithm for identifying NSFW images,” Yahoo research engineer Jay Mahadeokar and senior director of product management Gerry Pesavento wrote in a blog post.
  • Cloudera, Hortonworks, and Uber to Keynote at Apache Big Data and ApacheCon Europe
  • Vendors Pile on Big Data News at Strata
    Cloudera, Pentaho and Alation are among vendors making Big Data announcements at this week's Strata event. Vendors big and small are making news at this week's Strata + Hadoop event as they try to expand their portion of the Big Data market. Cloudera highlighted a trio of Apache Software Foundation (ASF) projects to which it contributes. Among them is Spark 2.0, which benefits from a new Dataset API that offers the promise of better usability and performance as well as new machine learning libraries.
  • New alliances focus on open-source, data science empowerment
    How can data science make a true market impact? Partnerships, particularly amongst open source communities. As IBM solidifies its enterprise strategies around data demands, two new partnerships emerge: one with Continuum Analytics, Inc., advancing open-source analytics for the enterprise; and another with Galvanize, initiating a Data Science for Executives program. Continuum Analytics, the creator and driving force behind Anaconda — a leading open data science platform powered by Python — has allied with IBM to advance open-source analytics for the enterprise. Data scientists and data engineers in open-source communities can now embrace Python and R to develop analytic and machine learning models in the Spark environment through its integration with IBM’s DataWorks Project. The new agreement between IBM and Galvanize, which provides a dynamic learning community for technology, will offer an assessment, analysis and training element for Galvanize’s Data Science for Executives program. This program empowers corporations to better understand, use and maximize the value of their data. The program will support IBM’s DataFirst Method, a methodology that IBM says provides the strategy, expertise and game plan to help ensure enterprise customers’ succeed on their journey to become a data-driven business.
  • Apache Spot: open source big data analytics for cyber
  • Chinese open source blockchain startup Antshares raises $4.5M through crowdsourcing [Ed: Microsoft-connected]
  • August and September 2016: photos from Pittsburgh and Fresno
  • Libre Learn Lab: a summit on freely licensed resources for education
    Libre Learn Lab is a two-day summit for people who create, use and implement freely licensed resources for K-12 education, bringing together educators, policy experts, software developers, hardware hackers, and activists to share best practices and address the challenges of widespread adoption of these resources in education. The 2nd biennial conference is Saturday, October 8th, and Sunday, October 9th, at the MIT Tang Center. The keynote addresses will be delivered by the FSF’s own Richard M. Stallman, former Chief Open Education Advisor Andrew Marcinek and founder of HacKIDemia Stefania Druga. At the event, there will be a special tribute to Dr. Seymour Papert (the father of educational computing) by Dr. Cynthia Solomon.