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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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How to secure VNC remote access with two-factor authentication

Filed under
HowTos

In this article, we will show you how to combine the NoMachine NX server to encrpyt VNC and remote X session combined with two-factor authentication from WiKID Systems to create a secure, fast remote access solution.

Alternative to Vista? Try the user friendly PCLINUXOS 2007!

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PCLOS

Technology Questions: Many of you are frustrated with vista, I know... but there are new alternatives coming out, and they are free too. At last, a superb Linux is out. Its called PCLINUXOS 2007 and its the most user friendly linux that I have found up to date. It puts ubuntu linux to shame.

Dell and Ubuntu: why bother?

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire: I have a question for Michael Dell - why is he trying to be cute about the company's foray into selling boxes with Ubuntu installed? In the normal course of things, Dell would do it all very formally - a press release, a media conference, a briefing to analysts and so on.

UltraStar NG: karaoke game that allows user supplied songs

Filed under
Software

DPotD: UltraStar-NG is the remake of UltraStar that works under GNU/Linux. It is coded in C++, and, for the technical part, it uses alsa for audio acquisition, fftw3 for getting the notes sung by the player, SDL for the visualisation and keyboard input, xine or gstreamer to play the music and librsvg or cairo to display the themes

Open Source may be cheap - but we still want support

Filed under
OSS

The Register: Open source is increasingly driving enterprise development projects and installations, but big customers still rely on start-up software providers for support.

Also: H&R Block Embraces Benefits of Open Source

Only 11% of Programmers Willing to Help MS-Funded Study

Filed under
OSS

Groklaw: What I gleaned from a quick reading of the report is that at some unspecified time (but I'm guessing prior to Microsoft rattling its patent saber), Microsoft funded a study about the GPLv3 patent clause to find out how much FOSS programmers simply adore the idea of Novell-Microsoft patent/interoperability types of deals.

Open or Closed. Which is bigger?

Filed under
OSS

ittoolbox blogs: Who's afraid of the big bad wolf? It is all the rage at this point in time to be talking about patents, licenses and lawsuits. It seems like a real David and Goliath story. Who is David? Who is Goliath? Who will win this epic battle?

Open source communities, adoption and the Microsoft-Novell deal

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Interviews

Search Enterprise Linux: What purpose do open source advocacy groups serve? Open source issues and strategies expert Don Rosenberg says that the biggest help that organizations like the Linux Foundation can offer is in interoperability and legal protection.

Red Hat to Microsoft: "We Have Always Been Respectful Of IP"

Filed under
Microsoft

InformationWeek: In a keynote opening the Open Source Business Conference in San Francisco, Red Hat Chairman Matthew Szulik Tuesday offered an oblique response to Microsoft's assertions that its patents cover code in Linux and other open-source products.

Also: Open Source's Only Friend

Backup your workstation with Backup Manager

Filed under
HowTos

Free Software Mag: Backing up is one of those tedious jobs that has to be done but is usually relegated to the end of the To Do list. Enter Backup Manager, which is a set of Bash and Perl scripts that alleviate the tediousness of performing backups.

Mozilla Gets Places Back in Firefox 3, Prepares for Tagging

Filed under
Moz/FF

CyberNet: There has been some good news lately on the progress of Firefox 3. Mozilla was able to get the backend of Places back into the latest nightly releases, but as of right now you won’t notice many differences.

Color Theory

Filed under
Linux

Talk BMC: Linux is all about choice. If you are running Linux as your desktop/laptop already, you have made a big choice. But those who have made the switch did not, one and all, make it for any monolithic reason. Here are ones I can think of for why people move to Linux from MS Windows:

KDE 3.5.7 Released!

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KDE

kde.org: The KDE Project today announced the immediate availability of KDE 3.5.7, a maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop for GNU/Linux and other UNIXes.

Also: KDE 3.5.7 Improves PIM and More

Lock down the GNOME desktop with Pessulus

Filed under
Software

Linux.com: Looking for a way to limit users' functionality on a publicly available machine, such as a kiosk machine for conference attendees? No one wants people trying to alter their systems for fun or malice. If you're running the GNOME environment, you can turn to a tool called Pessulus -- a lockdown manager for the GNOME desktop.

Top 5 OS X Style Dock Replacements for Linux

Filed under
Software

Pimp Your Linux: Why lie about it? Linux right out of the box is lacking style. They say clothes make the man, and I think that style supplements an operating system. To get things started, we are going to review the top 5 dock replacements that are out there, to make your Linux system look amazing!

PCLinuxOS 2007 Screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS

Phoronix: The much anticipated release of PCLinuxOS, version 2007, is now available for download. New in PCLinuxOS 2007 is KDE 3.5.6, the Linux 2.6.18.8 kernel, OpenOffice.org 2.2, Thunderbird 2.0, FrostWire, and over 5,000 additional packages through the software repository.

Firefox denies bloat

Filed under
Moz/FF

the Inquirer: THE MAKER OF Firefox, the Mozzarella Foundation has denied that the Open Source browser is getting more bloated than Elvis Priesley.

OpenOffice worm downloads bunny porn

Filed under
Security

iTNews: A newly-discovered worm targeting OpenOffice attempts to download indecent JPEG images onto compromised Windows, Mac and Linux PCs.

300 Units of wizpy Have Been Adopted by Japanese Government

Filed under
Linux

Press Release: Turbolinux, Inc. announced today that their new USB Bootable Linux OS device, wizpy, has been adopted by Japanese Government's Asia Open Source Software Infrastructure Development Project and 300 units have been distributed to the students of Hanoi University of Technology as part of the Project.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?