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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux-based smart glasses keep it stylish Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 1:07am
Story 5 Deadly Linux Commands You Should Never Run Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 1:01am
Story Cairo-Dock / GLX-Dock 3.4 is now available Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 12:53am
Story Mesa 10.4 Tentatively Planned For Early December Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 12:43am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 10:00pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 10:00pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 10:00pm
Story Elementary OS’s Pantheon Desktop May Become Available On Fedora Systems, Starting With Fedora 22 Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 9:09pm
Story Docker in Production — What We’ve Learned Launching Over 300 Million Containers Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 8:45pm
Story Review: Scientific Linux 7.0 GNOME Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 8:43pm

State of the LinuxWorld

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: Linux is beginning to find its legs as the foundation in many different technologies and in the process is fueling a feedback loop that is helping accelerate the operating system's popularity. The evidence of the cooperation will be on display at next week's LinuxWorld conference in San Francisco.

Puppy's Leader Retirement pre-announcement

Filed under
Linux

puppylinux.com/blog: One of them is that I would like to move to developing an application, in particular I am interested in porting my EVE vector editor to Linux, running with one of the native GUI libraries such as GTK. Also, I would like to do other things.

How Dell and System76’s Ubuntu Machines Stack Up to Their Mac Counterparts

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

dawningvalley.com: Open source operating systems obviously give more bang for the buck than any other operating system in the world. After all, they’re free, and you can’t get lower than free (unless you’re Kaspersky). However, what about pre-installed Ubuntu machines? Do they beat their Windows and OS X competitors in the bang for the buck category?

Don't Like Mono? Try Vala.

Filed under
Software

blog.ibeentoubuntu: My recent post about Mono was sincere, and Boycott Novell has the story about Debian wrong, but Gnome actually is pushing an alternative. Vala is a new language developed by Gnome specifically for developing Gnome apps. It has a syntax very similar to Java or C# (closer to C# from what I've read) and a precompiler which maps the Vala to C source and header files

KDE 4.1 Live CD

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

lazytechguy.com: I just bought a new laptop and KDE guys decide to pamper me by releasing the greatest desktop manager in form of KDE 4.1. To add cherry to the cake OpenSUSE guys made a Live CD and gave me the opportunity to fiddle with it.

Ace in the hole

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

chinwong.com: IT’S difficult to write about the Aspire One from Acer without gushing. Out of the box, this mini-notebook is the perfect traveling companion for anyone who simply needs to surf the Web, send e-mail and perform typical office tasks such as typing up documents, working on spreadsheets or giving a presentation.

Visualizing Open Source Development

Filed under
Software

technocrat.net: An open source project called Code_Swarm has come up with an animated process video outlining the various ways open source projects get started and are refined.

7 Uses of GParted Live

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: I’ve been using GNU Parted to slice and dice my disk in preference to the fdisk for almost as long as I’ve been using Linux. We all fill up our hard-drives from time to time, but thanks to Gnome GParted, rearranging disk partitions isn’t as terrifying as it used to be.

The Chicken Crossing The Road

Filed under
Humor

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: NT Chicken: Will cross the road in June. No, August. September for sure. OS/2 Chicken: It crossed the road in style years ago, but it was so quiet that nobody noticed.

GNOME Layout

Filed under
Software

jaysonrowe.wordpress: I’ve often wondered why more of the popular Linux distro’s don’t adopt what most new user’s to Linux would feel as “normal” as a default layout. I wonder how many “newbie” Linux users HATE the two panels taking up screen-space, yet have no clue that it can be consolidated into one.

Why is there no real FOSS social network?

Filed under
Software

seanrtilley.blogspot: I have had a thought. Upon looking upon a identi.ca today, I had a thought. While we have a VERY nice alternative to Twitter, what about a full-on alternative to Myspace?

The revenge of the Linux munchkins

Filed under
Linux

thebeezspeaks.blogspot: We have known about the Microsoft muchkins all our lives. Those are people who are paid to scan the Internet for unfavorable articles and use the comment facilities to do what Microsoft does best: spread FUD. As far as I know there is no such equivalent in the Linux world. It just seems like that.

more odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Bug your distro to package OpenJPEG

  • Google bans the Mozilla Public License
  • How to convert an img file to an iso
  • Gentoo Install Notes for a Fujitsu LifeBook A6110
  • Leaking information about Boston Summit 2008

KDE 4.1 Mania (Overview on Kubuntu, Fedora and Opensuse)

Filed under
KDE

linux-guider.blogspot: KDE 4 is the current series of releases of the K Desktop Environment. The first version (4.0.0) of this series was released on 11 January 2008. KDE 4.1 was released on July 29, 2008. KDE 4.1 includes a shared emoticon theming system which is used in PIM and Kopete, and DXS.

KDE 4.1: Good, bad, or beautiful?

Filed under
KDE

celettu.wordpress: The last week, I’ve been struggling with KDE 4.1. I really want to like it. Actually, I do like it. It’s stable, it’s fast, and it’s gorgeous. I love the Oxygen look, the plasmoids, the KWin desktop effects…it all looks great.

gDesklets - Desklets for your Desktop in openSUSE

Filed under
Software
HowTos

susegeek.com: gDesklets is another great tool like Google Gadgets for bringing mini programs called desklets such as weather forecasts, news tickers, system information displays, or music player controls, onto your desktop, where they are sitting there in a symbiotic relationship of eye candy and usefulness.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Managing packages using apt on Ubuntu

  • Enable NumLock in KDE 4.1
  • Getting Ruby Plasmoids up and running in KDE 4.1 (on Kubuntu)
  • NIC bonding with Ubuntu

some bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • A Quick Look at Xubuntu Xtreme

  • Linux Mint one year later
  • GNU/Linux
  • My Week in Ubuntu: KDE 4.1
  • Sabayon 3.5

some shorts & stuff

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Outlaws 49 - Summer of Crap

  • More fun than it looks: Compiz + MPX
  • Theme Fix in Ubuntu 8.10
  • More Weekend Unix and Linux Levity
  • Ask Linux.com: Quotas, Java, and Linux in the car

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ext3, ReiserFS & XFS in Windows thanks to coLinux

  • Installing Ubuntu on Windows using Wubi
  • xorg-x11 keycodes for a Logitech 350 Keyboard
  • Virtualize your operating system with qemu
  • Reorder your Boot Menu with KGRUBEditor
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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.