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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 525 srlinuxx 16/09/2013 - 5:32pm
Story Clementine 1.2 reaching to the clouds srlinuxx 14/09/2013 - 6:35pm
Story Football Manager 2014 Release Date Announced srlinuxx 14/09/2013 - 6:29pm
Story The Elementary Linux Desktop srlinuxx 14/09/2013 - 6:25pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 13/09/2013 - 8:32pm
Story Fedora 20 Alpha Has Been Delayed By One Week srlinuxx 13/09/2013 - 5:46am
Story New Bodhi Linux Arrives after Six Months with New Schedule srlinuxx 13/09/2013 - 5:45am
Story Steam Serving Up 64bit Linux Games srlinuxx 13/09/2013 - 5:02am
Story Will Intel's Quark Run Linux? srlinuxx 12/09/2013 - 9:06pm
Story Improve The Look of Firefox In GNOME srlinuxx 12/09/2013 - 6:13pm

Is Linux for you?

Filed under
Linux

domhnallck.blogspot: Some time ago, I dumped Windows for Linux. It wasn't an easy task to do so. Now that I'm pretty well set, however, I see no reason to go with a dual boot, or ever go back to any incarnation of Windows again.

Also: Linux: May the source be with you

Wacraft 3 TFT and Battle.net in Ubuntu with Cedega

Filed under
HowTos

El Bloguenn: Here we go again, today's topic: Install Warcraft 3 with TFT in Ubuntu using Cedega. I'm a great Dota fan, and I had to restart my computer everytime I wanted to play, so I installed it in my Ubuntu, and it works great!

Also: Kiba-Dock in Ubuntu
And: Mp3Blaster, Console Player for Linux

Ubuntu + mpd + Jinzora + Hi-Fi == ACE

Filed under
HowTos

The Temple of Bague: I have a decrepit old PC that I need to find a job for and we have a very good and very expensive hi-fi seperates system going to waste. So here’s the solution.

Dell-sapointment

Filed under
Linux

Aaron Seigo: Some of the blockers for mainstream Linux desktop usage are lack of legal codecs, hardware integration and certain types of basic functionality like software suspend not working reliably. This is not news, of course, but rather the typical gripes people have had for years. Even as much of the Free software has reached the point of being true-blue entries in the top echelons of functionality and quality, some of these issues continue to nag at us unanswered.

Using pipes as serial port for VirtualBox

Filed under
HowTos

blino's mandriva blog: While trying to reproduce and debug UnionFS bugs with VirtualBox, I needed to extract a copy of the call traces. Screenshots are not easily usable, so I tried the "serial ports" feature of VirtualBox.

The Definition of Insanity

Filed under
OSS

tuxdeluxe: In the computing world, ISO standards have a mixed record. But standards don't rule the computing world. Microsoft has historically had an ambivalent view of standards. This historical record makes the recent global activities over the "Office Open XML" (OOXML) document format so interesting.

More food and football with Mark Shuttleworth

Filed under
Ubuntu

matt asay: Back in April I was fortunate to host Mark Shuttleworth at an Arsenal game and then dinner. Today, we repeated the day with an amazingly fun day at the Arsenal vs. Tottenham match. I asked Mark two poignant questions about Ubuntu:

Showing active/inactive windows in KDE4

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers: There has been some discussion on the kde-core-devel mailing list about a change to how the active window should be distinguished from the inactive windows, where different color palettes are used for the widgets inside inactive windows.

Two Cool new Applets for Awn

Filed under
Software

linux movement: The first one is a nifty last fm applet which sits on your dock so you can listen to your last fm stations. The next new Applet is the gmail notifier Apple. Here are some nice images:

When will Linux sellers wake up?

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe: As I went rambling about the web I came across OSNews and checked out an article on the release of Fedora 8 Test 2. Right there in the middle of the article was the Microsoft ad you see below.

Email Clients and Patches

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Randy Dunlap sent a patch to the Linux kernel mailing list described as adding "info about various email clients and their applicability in being used to send Linux kernel patches."

Google scores a win over Microsoft’s OOXML

Filed under
OSS

zdnet blogs: Microsoft’s proposal for the fast track of the OOXML standard was recently shot down by the ISO. Google concludes that Microsoft’s OOXML should never be standardized due to things like reliance on proprietary elements and simply not enough time to review the >6000 page document that outlines the standard.

Bash scripting code structure

Filed under
HowTos

mr-open-source: Bash scripts are a powerful tool used by linux/unix adminstrators. When developing scripts a good code structure is invaluable to a seasoned administrator. This article will show how to write an apache webserver log rotation script and hopefully give you a solid structural foundation to start writing your own bash scripts.

PC World Linux laptop warranty saga gets even more bizarre

Filed under
Linux

daniweb: On the 11th September a customer of the PC World computer superstore in Colliers Wood, London took his laptop back for an under warranty repair. The computer was only a few months old, and a crack had appeared near the left hinge which is indicative of an internal joint failing.

Open-Source Developers Speak Out About AMD

Filed under
OSS

phoronix: AMD started delivering on their word of providing GPU specifications to the open-source community without a Non-Disclosure Agreement, and now with the 2007 X Developer Summit having come to a close, we asked several key members of the X.Org community on how they judge AMD's recent move.

Discussing the x86 Merge

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Sam Ravnborg took a look at the x86 unification patches and commented, "from the mails and discussions I expected it be be obvious what was i386 only, what was shared and what was x86_64 only."

The Big SMB Problem: Dropping Microsoft Office

Filed under
Software

J_K9 @ Linux: Linux and Open Source software are not entirely free: they have setup costs, maintenance costs and time and productivity costs. Despite all of these costs, many SMBs still choose to switch to Linux and Open Source. Why?

RedHat 6.2 - wow!

Filed under
Linux

A.P.Lawrence: Today I meandered down state to answer a distress call on a Linux box exhibiting a number of baffling symptoms (well, they baffled me on the phone at least). Seemed odd, so I drove on down. Imagine my delight to find a RedHat 6.2 box.

Howto Set Flickr images as Ubuntu desktop wallpaper

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntu geek: Webilder delivers stunning wallpapers to your Linux desktop, directly from Flickr and Webshots. You choose what keywords (tags) to watch for, and photos are automatically downloaded to your computer.

Free Software is good for business

Filed under
OSS

ITPro: Not so long ago the common wisdom was that free and open source software would grow strongly in the market for infrastructure software - operating systems, databases and web servers that have a generic applicability across all markets - but that non-free software would continue to dominate in the realm of vertical markets - where applications fulfil a specific role in a specialised commercial environment.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming