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Tuesday, 28 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 7:44am
Story User Guide To Setting Up The Raspberry PI srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 2:55am
Story Open source is legal software alternative srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 2:49am
Story ioquake3 move srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 2:44am
Blog entry Ubuntu Phone, Good idea? fieldyweb 02/01/2013 - 8:36pm
Story Choosing a text editor srlinuxx 02/01/2013 - 6:58pm
Story UEFI SecureBoot + Linux, is the nightmare over? srlinuxx 02/01/2013 - 6:56pm
Story Ubuntu Phone OS Unveiled by Canonical srlinuxx 02/01/2013 - 6:54pm
Story 2012, a great year for KDE srlinuxx 02/01/2013 - 6:50pm
Story openSUSE 12.2 Review: an Immaculate Conception srlinuxx 02/01/2013 - 5:23pm

Dude, you don't have to get a Dell

Filed under
Linux

MaximumPC: If you're a newb looking to dip your toe into the waters of the Linux world, Dell's line-up of preinstalled Ubuntu PCs is a very good first choice. But while Dell certainly appears to have the best offering of Linux desktops and notebooks at the moment, it isn't the only choice out there. Here are five alternatives for Linux-ready PCs.

Linux: Reviewing The Tickless Kernel For x86-64

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Included in Andrew Morton's potential 2.6.23 merge list were a series of patches to make the x86-64 architecture tickless. Andi Kleen, the x86-64 maintainer replied, "I'm sceptical about the dynticks code. It just rips out the x86-64 timing code completely."

Willing to buy a high-end, free-software-only laptop?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth: With projects like Gobuntu and gNewSense aiming to provide a platform that is zealous about free software, the obvious question is “where can I run it?”. And right now, as far as laptops go, there are no good answers.

Dzen: pop-up windows from the command-line

linux.com: I stumbled across an interesting and useful tool recently called dzen, a "general purpose messaging and notification program" written by Rob Manea. Basically, dzen provides an instant-on/instant-off pop-up terminal window, along with a multitude of options that allow you to run just about any command.

Linspire releases Open XML translator

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux: Linux vendor Linspire on July 11 said that the new Open XML translator is now available for use in its latest Freespire and Linspire distributions. The Open XML translator enables bi-directional compatibility, so that files saved in the Microsoft-created Open XML format can be opened by OpenOffice.org users, and files created by OpenOffice can be saved in Open XML format.

A beginner’s introduction to the GNU/Linux command line—Managing processes

Filed under
HowTos

element14: Your GNU/Linux computer is an amazing machine. It can display images. It can run programs. It can perform dozens of functions all at the same time. How can you keep track of all this activity?

VMGL: Full OpenGL 3D Hardware Acceleration For Virtual Machines

Filed under
Software

E@zyVG: Introducing VMGL, which provides OpenGL Hardware 3D Acceleration for Virtual Machines. When tested in xen with Quake 3 & Unreal Tournament 2004 it provides for up to 87% of the performance of the native implementation.

10 ideas to improve Gnome

Filed under
Software

Fabrice Facorat: I've just read an article about 10 ways to improve the GNOME Desktop, and I must admit that many points are sensible. Let analyze them :

Virtual Hosting With PureFTPd And MySQL On Fedora 7

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a PureFTPd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users.

A three-pronged attack on performance

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: A computer running Linux can outperform the same computer running Windows XP or Vista. Even so, you may be able to make your Linux system even faster. Here are three optimizations, at different levels, that can make your Linux system perform better.

Should FOSS Change to a Dual License?

Filed under
OSS

Penguin Pete: Microsoft is like a stoned Pac-Man with the munchies gobbling up Linux lately. The latest recruit is TurboLinux, who is going to help them spread the foulness that is OOXML (pronounced "ooks-mull"). While we're all scampering around in circles asking "What are they doing? Who will they eat next? What is their strategy?", has anybody considered that maybe they've simply decided to keep buying GNU/Linux until they own it?

First look: Skype for the Nokia N800 Internet Tablet

Filed under
Software

ars technica: When the Nokia N800 Internet Tablet was announced at the beginning of the year, we were excited about the successor to the 770. Not only was there an updated version of the Linux-based Internet Tablet OS and significantly-improved hardware, but Nokia also promised us a fully-functional Skype client for the N800. Nearly six months after the tablet's launch, the Skype client has finally arrived.

Also: At the races with the Kangaroo TV

Preliminary Review: Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon Alpha 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

seopher: My heart sank a little bit as I sat through 2-3 minutes of what can only be described as 'error messages' while this early release of Gutsy Gibbon booted on my virtual machine - although it came through in the end. Here we have the Alpha 2 release of Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon for me to cast a preliminary eye over 3 months prior to release.

Linux: Revisiting Swap Prefetch

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Another thread discussed potentially merging the swap prefetch patch into the mainline Linux kernel. Con Kolivas started the thread saying "I fixed all bugs I could find and improved it as much as I could last kernel cycle. Put me and the users out of our misery and merge it now or delete it forever please."

Coming Full Circle on PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

Yet Another Linux Blog: I see articles like OSWeekly’s "The Future of Publishing with Linux Magazines" and I chuckle a bit. Mainly because PCLinuxOS Magazine will have its 12 monthly issue published next month.

AMD Radeon HD 2000 Series & Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: Since January of this year we have been telling you that AMD has been silently working on R600 (Radeon HD 2000) support for their proprietary Linux "fglrx" driver. However, for the end-user the support isn't complete and still equates to being useless. But how does the recently announced Avivo R500 driver function with the newer R600 series?

Beryl: Eye Candy (and More) for Linux

Filed under
Software

daniweb.com: Over the past few years, 3-D rendering in window managers has become a new trend in the desktop environment. Linux users do not have to feel left out if they too want their desktop to be a little prettier. Beryl (formerly Compiz) gives many customizable features for users that want 3-D rendering in Gnome, KDE, or other window managers.

Links I Haven't Linked To

Filed under
News

Here's a bunch of links to stories that I've had open for a day or so and haven't had a chance to publish:

Improving Linux font rasterization?

Filed under
Software

/home/liquidat: Many people are unsatisfied with the existing ways of font display systems on Linux. A research paper from Anti-Grain now showed easy but powerful text rasterization improvements. However, the answer from the FreeType developers is a bit sobering.

OpenSUSE LiveCD Installer

Filed under
SUSE

snorp.net: It’s still in early development and has lots of hacks to make things work, but it does manage to install a working system onto your machine. The installation itself is really pretty simple.

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Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more

Tired of Windows and MAC computer systems? Linux may now be ready for prime time

Are you a bit tired of the same old options of salt and pepper, meaning having to choose only between the venerable Windows and MAC computer operating systems? Looking to branch out a bit, maybe take a walk on the wild side, learn some new things and save money? If so, the Linux operating system, which has been around for a long time and is used and loved by many hard-core techies and developers, may now be ready for prime time with the masses. Read more

Braswell based Pico-ITX SBC offers multiple expansion options

Axiomtek’s PICO300 is a Pico-ITX SBC with Intel Braswell, SATA-600, extended temperature support, and both a mini-PCIe and homegrown expansion connector. Axiomtek has launched a variation on its recently announced Intel Apollo Lake based PICO312 SBC that switches to the older Intel Braswell generation and offers a slightly reduced feature set. The board layout has also changed somewhat, with LVDS, SATA, and USB ports all changing location. Read more