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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 23 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Zenwalking

Filed under
Linux

shinywankenobi.wordpress: I’ve tried just about every Linux distro you could mention over the years. In my partial boredom I decided to flip through Distrowatch’s pages and see what I could find to play with. I want something different. Zenwalk… Zenwalk, where the Hell have you been all my life?

Review: Opera Mini 4.2 Beta

Filed under
Software

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: USING a mobile phone to access the worldwide web has rarely been a pleasant experience. But then along came Oslo-based Opera with their Mini 4.2 browser - and all that changed.

Blown Away by Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

homecomputerguide.com: I’ve been working on Windows computers for nearly two decades and have never been compelled to use anything else. But a recent experience with something called Linux Ubuntu has turned my computer world view on its head!

How to use OpenOffice.org as a Two Pane Outliner

Filed under
HowTos

So, although OpenOffice.org does not act as a one pane outliner, we can set it up as a two pane outliner. This can be very useful for structuring long documents, or keeping scraps of disparate information in one handy file.

To do this requires two things: the use of the Navigator, and the use of headline styles when structuring your document. Let’s start up OpenOffice.org Writer and see how this works.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Gartner: 85 percent of companies using open source

  • Kontact and Citadel - experiences
  • USB 3.0 debuts
  • How “why” is the most important question open source vendors should ask
  • Clueless Linux User
  • British Council using Drupal
  • Norway Pledges Funds for Government Open Source Usage
  • The importance of open source, from a 17 year olds point of view
  • Linuxhater, failed astroturfer?
  • Cloud Apps, Netbooks and the Mobile Internet: Flash, Bang, Fizzle
  • What if Sun fails with open source?
  • Testing Mandriva
  • Using Ubuntu Linux at the American International School
  • Slumberland rests easy after move away from proprietary Unix
  • kerneloops.org records its 100,000th oops
  • Running Linux and z/OS on a single mainframe poses no problem
  • How to see when you should not upgrade
  • Kernel Log: New graphics drivers and Linux versions: Dom0 patches for 2.6.29?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Getting Gnome Volume Manager to Play Nice

  • Crafting offers and invoice documents with Kraft
  • Find all SSH Hosts
  • Setting Up Parental Controls in Ubuntu
  • Easier file renaming with renameutils
  • Improve Your Intelligence with Brain Workshop
  • Add windows codecs to Ubuntu Intrepid 8.10

Coherence brings UPnP to GNOME

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Coherence is a Python library that implements UPnP and the Digital Living Network Alliance standard, protocols that facilitate interoperability between networked media devices.

Unemployed? Five reasons to build your resume with FOSS contributions

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: It looks like we’ve gone from speculating whether we’re headed into recession depression. Yihong Ding, over on the Thinking Space blog,predicts that we’ll have a “Golden Age” of the Web. If that’s the case, shouldn’t we be expecting a “Golden Age” for open source, with all the idle programmers and IT folks at home with time on their hands?

Review of StarOffice 9

Filed under
Software

linuxloop.com: For several weeks now I have been testing an early copy of StarOffice 9, Sun’s commercial alternative of OpenOffice.org. Finally, today, I can tell you about it.

On a Blender Bender

Filed under
Software

kdubois.net: So being interested in all things 3d, I finally sat down and started learning Blender. The inability of me to make acceptable looking 3d models has long been a hole in my 3d graphics knowledge, but no more!

Another day, another Microsoft lie

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld.com: You can count on Microsoft pulling the fake research report trick at least once a year. This time around it’s a study by ClickStream Technologies, which found Microsoft Office, to be far more popular than OpenOffice.org, which in turn was far more popular than Google Docs.

Introducing Kwin

Filed under
KDE

introducingkde4.blogspot: KDE 3.5.x had an option for enabling composite called kcompmgr. The KDE developers wanted eye-candy composite for they KDE 4 series, so they had 3 options, writing a whole new window manager, use compiz or improving kwin, they took the last one.

Flickr Uploaders for Linux: Secretive, But Not Endangered Beasts

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: Flickr is almost like Xerox, or Kleenex, in that its name is in some ways inextricably linked to the service it delivers. Though Flickr has a browser uploader, there are limitations. For years, there has been one uploader option on that page -- a third party, cross platform (and very serviceable) -- that is Linux compatible.

Open Source Considered Harmful

Filed under
OSS

itworld.com: As soon as I think I have a handle on where things are currently at, along comes some new complex twist; some new turn; some new innovation that threatens to take the status quo and put it through the wood chipper. I blame the open source phenomenon for that.

Firefox 3.1 gets tab tearing

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: The latest Firefox 3.1 development release features the announced option for tab tearing: drag a tab out of its current window, and it is removed and opened on a new one, providing a more intuitive way to organize your web browsing.

Also: Here Be Dragons!

Linux Netbooks

Three Ways to Use Free Software Without Ripping Anyone Off

Filed under
Software

I talk to people a lot about free and open software. I usually find that people have never heard of it before. So I talk to people a lot, and hand out CDs full of free software, believing I’m helping people by giving them options that don’t cost hundreds of dollars. One person I talked to a lot about free software was Ross.

Mandriva Linux 2009 One Xfce released

Filed under
MDV

Thanks to the Mandriva Xfce volunteer development team, a community Xfce One edition of Mandriva Linux 2009 is now available for download from all official Mandriva mirrors. A list of download locations can be found on the Wiki page. This release gives you all the benefits of Mandriva Linux 2009 along with a fast and stable Xfce desktop.

From Windows Capable to the Linux laptop

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: I think you can draw a straight line from the Vista Capable brouhaha to recent introductions of laptop Linux by HP and Dell, once Microsoft’s most loyal OEMs.

The Super Windows That...Couldn't

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: One of the more bizarre accusations flung by Microsoft at GNU/Linux over the years is that it doesn't scale. Sadly, that narrative has been rather undermined by the independent Top500 supercomputing sites ranking.

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Zuul: Proven open-source continuous integration/continuous delivery

If you think Zuul is the Gatekeeper, demigod, and minion of the ancient Hittite god Gozer, then you're a Ghostbusters fan, too. But, if you're interested in continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) and not "human sacrifice, dogs, and cats living together... mass hysteria," then you want Zuul, OpenStack's open-source CI/CD platform. Zuul originally was developed for OpenStack CI testing. For years, OpenStack, the Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, got all the attention. Over time, people began to realize that as impressive as OpenStack was, the CI system behind it, which enabled contributors and users across many different organizations to work and develop quickly together across multiple projects, was impressive in its own right. Read more

Smallest RK3399 hacker board yet ships at $129 with 4GB DDR4

FriendlyElec has launched a 100 x 64mm, $129 “NanoPC-T4” SBC that runs Android or Linux on a Rockchip RK3399 with 4G DDR4, native GbE, WiFi-ac, DP, HDMI 2.0, 0 to 80℃ support, and M.2 and 40-pin expansion. FriendlyElec has released its most powerful and priciest hacker board to date, which it promotes as being the smallest RK3399-based SBC on the market. The 100 x 64mm NanoPC-T4 opens with a $129 discount price with the default 4GB DDR4 and 16GB eMMC. Although that will likely rise in the coming months, it’s still priced in the middle range of open spec RK3399 SBCs. Read more

today's leftovers

  • How to dual-boot Linux and Windows
    Even though Linux is a great operating system with widespread hardware and software support, the reality is that sometimes you have to use Windows, perhaps due to key apps that won't run under Linux. Thankfully, dual-booting Windows and Linux is very straightforward—and I'll show you how to set it up, with Windows 10 and Ubuntu 18.04, in this article. Before you get started, make sure you've backed up your computer. Although the dual-boot setup process is not very involved, accidents can still happen. So take the time to back up your important files in case chaos theory comes into play. In addition to backing up your files, consider taking an image backup of the disk as well, though that's not required and can be a more advanced process.
  • Weather Forecasting Gets A Big Lift In Japan
    This is a lot more compute capacity than JMA has had available to do generic weather forecasting as well as do predictions for typhoons, tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions – the weather forecasting alone is predicted to run 10X faster, according to Cray.
  • Bitwarden Password Manager Adds Command Line Vault
    Bitwarden, the secure, open source password manager we talked about recently, added a command line tool to its list of apps you can use to access your passwords. Bitwarden CLI is currently in public beta testing, and according to its documentation, it includes all the features available in other Bitwarden client applications, like the desktop or browser extension.
  • GSoC’18 Week 1
    The first week of the coding period was great and I got to learn a lot of new things. My mentors help me on every stage and the work is going on as planne [...] Improvement in the overall UI is still in progress. Other than this, I have been working on refactoring the current code for this activity and breaking the whole code into various elements. For the next week, my main task is to complete the overall UI of this activity and add more geometries for drawing.
  • Time to Test Plasma 5.13 Beta
    The forthcoming new release of Plasma 5.13 will have some lovely new features such as rewritten System Settings pages and Plasma Browser Integration. But we need testers. Incase you missed it the Plasma 5.13 release announce has a rundown of the main features. If you are an auditory learner you can listen to the Late Night Linux Extra podcast where Jonathan “great communicator” Riddell talks about the recent sprint and the release.
  • GSoC students are already hacking!
    We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. ;)
  • CryptoFest a openSUSE Conference již tento víkend v Praze
  • openSUSE Conference a CryptoFest 2018
  • Aaeon reveals two rugged, Linux-ready embedded PCs
    Aaeon unveiled two Linux-friendly embedded systems: an “AIOT-IP6801” gateway equipped with an Apollo Lake-based UP Squared SBC with WiFi and LoRa, and a “Boxer-8120AI” mini-PC with an Nvidia Jetson TX2 module and 4x GbE ports. Aaeon announced that three of its Linux-ready embedded systems have won Computex d&j awards, including two previously unannounced models: an Intel Apollo Lake based AIOT-IP6801 gateway based on Aaeon’s community-backed UP Squared board, as well as a Boxer-8120AI embedded computer built around an Arm-based Jetson TX2 module.
  • Last Call for Purism's Librem 5 Dev Kits, Git Protocol Version 2 Released, LXQt Version 0.13.0 Now Available and More
    Purism announces last call for its Librem 5 dev kits. If you're interested in the hardware that will be the platform for the Librem 5 privacy-focused phones, place your order by June 1, 2018. The dev kit is $399, and it includes "screen, touchscreen, development mainboard, cabling, power supply and various sensors (free worldwide shipping)".

Programming: GNU Parallel, Rust, Go