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Friday, 15 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Small banks turn to open source solutions to cut costs Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 9:24am
Story The Gentle Art of Muddying the Licensing Waters Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 9:23am
Story Librarian Council, NITDA Train Professionals in Open Source Software Application Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 9:17am
Story CoreOS Acquires Quay.io for Private Docker Repositories Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 8:39am
Story Upgrading libraries to open source Koha system Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 8:31am
Story Galaxy Alpha: Samsung Puts Pedal to Metal Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:57am
Story Debian Installer Images Now In Beta For 8.0 Jessie Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:51am
Story Thanks KDE Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:43am
Story 2038 Kernel Summit Discussion Fodder Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:32am
Story Fedora 21 Delayed, New User Questions, and Variety Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:16am

10 Reasons Why I Switched To Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

kozaru.net: I’ve been running Ubuntu as my sole OS on my laptop for around 8 months now. I had some teething problems at first, managed to fudge a few things to work, but the latest Ubuntu has sorted out the last few niggling things for me. Here is a list of some reasons.

Open Movie Editor Releases New Version

Filed under
Movies

Linux based non-linear video application, Open Movie Editor, has released a new version. Originally new sourced were rolled out on May 21st, with a small bug fix update now available from May 23rd.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Hardy Heron on the OLPC XO-1

  • Reporting bugs the Debian way
  • Delete Windows/DOS carriage return characters from text files
  • Going virtual with Windows apps on Novell’s SUSE
  • Try Enlightenment For Your Ubuntu Hardy
  • How fast will you upgrade your Linux installation?
  • Linux opens London's Oyster
  • OpenSolaris 2008.05 VS Ubuntu 8.04
  • Using Who To Find What And When On Linux and Unix
  • Is Open Source software safe and secure?
  • Fedora 9: Fix Embedded Youtube Video Browser Problem

More adventures with Mepis

Filed under
Linux

arnoarts.blogspot: Things don't usually go as smoothly as we'd like. I had better luck with my computers. As you know I made the switch to Mepis 7.0 and it just works. I am learning to like KDE desktop, it has so much stuff, but I miss Xfce.

Why open source needs an attitude adjustment

Filed under
OSS

weblog.infoworld.com: Recession be damned. The first quarter of the year saw a record $203.7 million of venture capital flow to young open source companies. You'd think that would be a cause for celebration, but for too many members of the open source community money is, well, icky.

Linux sales grow 22 per cent in China

Filed under
Linux

vnunet.com: The commercial Linux market in China has seen sales value increase 22.6 per cent over the past year, according to new research. "Servers are still the major application for the Linux market," CCID analysts noted in a recent report.

Linux start-up Sugar Labs in informal talks with four laptop makers

Filed under
OLPC

betanews.com: Sugar Laboratories, Inc. is now in informal discussions with four ultra-low cost laptop manufacturers about the possibility of running its Linux software on their hardware, according to the new company's founder.

Ubuntu to announce its mobile Linux in June

Filed under
Ubuntu

cnet.com: Canonical will announce Netbook Remix, its version of Ubuntu Linux tailored for mobile devices, in two weeks, Chief Executive Mark Shuttleworth said.

Firefox is your nanny?

Filed under
Moz/FF

commandline.org.uk: Extension frameworks are a good way to add new functionality to large applications that are messy to alter directly, they also help to quickly add functionality now. The whole fun of extensions is that you can make your own and download random ones from the Internet, try them out for a bit. This of course implies two things.

Also: Firefox 3 — The “End Game”

no more desktop icons in KDE 4.1

Filed under
KDE

Aaron J. Seigo: I just committed a change to the default desktop containment that removes desktop icon support. Yes, it has finally happened ... no more splattering icons from the "desktop" folder across the screen. Buh-bye.

EU shows size of Microsoft credibility gap

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: The European Union will investigate Microsoft’s support for the Open Document Format (ODF) in Office. It wonders whether the move increases competition.

Also: Is Microsoft Office in trouble?

Miro

Filed under
Software

linuxowns.wordpress: Miro is a open-source cross-platform application, the program can read RSS feeds and it will let you download those videos. Besides that it can also download videos from url and bittorrent and it will let you import all the videos on your harddrive and create playlists for them.

Fedora 9 tools demystify installation and upgrades

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: The Fedora project has always offered installation options. The best known of these options are the Fedora spins -- roll-your-own install images that emphasize a particular desktop or purpose, such as providing the distribution's complete repository on DVD. With Fedora 9, the project has expanded its traditional emphasis with two new tools: LiveUSB Creator, a Windows application for producing live Fedora flash drives, and PreUpgrade, a wizard to help existing users move from one release to another.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 23

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #23 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Announcing openSUSE 11.0 Beta 3, People of openSUSE: Wolfgang Koller, and Status Updates.

Two Hidden Features New in Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

sitepoint.com/blog: Firefox 3 Release Candidate 1 was revealed to the world last week, which means the final release is only about a month away. If you haven’t yet checked that your site works smoothly in the new browser, now’s the time!

Also: about:addons - AMO changes, Future of add-ons, Bundling components & more

Flock draws $15 million for social browsing

Filed under
Moz/FF

cnet.com: Flock, a Firefox-based Web browser that plays up social networking online, has raised $15 million in a fourth round of funding led by Fidelity Ventures. Flock, which was built on Firefox code, caters to people who want to stay on top of services like Twitter, MySpace, Facebook, and Flickr with features that make it easier to broadcast messages to your network.

Asus EeePC, Part Four: A miscellany of Tips and Tricks

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Since the first three parts of this series came out, (One, Two and Three) the beginning of May has seen the launch of the new EeePC 900 series. Yes, the E900 series has a larger screen but you make as well make the most of every available seven or nine inches. Other tips and tricks aimed at boosting performance should also apply.

Microsoft and ODF: Has Hades Gone Sub-Zero?

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxjournal.com: As I've written elsewhere, I see increasing signs of new Microsoft approach to open source, which involves loving applications to death, while undermining GNU/Linux. The idea might be to lull the wider free software community into a false sense of security while digging away at the foundations, so that one day open sources apps find themselves running mostly on Windows, with Microsoft in the driving seat.

Also: Should We Fear the (Redmond) Geeks Bearing Gifts?

30 days without Windows, and with Ubuntu 8.04 "Hardy Heron"

  • 30 days without Windows, and with Ubuntu 8.04 "Hardy Heron"

  • Linux after one year

What Freezes the System: Firefox or ext3?

Filed under
Moz/FF

softpedia.com: A few days ago, the first Release Candidate for Firefox 3 was launched but some problems still remained unfixed, like the one that caused the browser (and sometimes the entire system) to freeze.

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Android Leftovers

FreeBSD-Based TrueOS 17.12 Released

The FreeBSD-based operating system TrueOS that's formerly known as PC-BSD has put out their last stable update of 2017. TrueOS 17.12 is now available as the latest six-month stable update for this desktop-focused FreeBSD distribution that also offers a server flavor. TrueOS continues using OpenRC as its init system and this cycle they have continued improving their Qt5-based Lumina desktop environment, the Bhyve hypervisor is now supported in the TrueOS server install, improved removable device support, and more. Read more

An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

Joplin is an open source cross-platform note-taking and to-do application. It can handle a large number of notes, organized into notebooks, and can synchronize them across multiple devices. The notes can be edited in Markdown, either from within the app or with your own text editor, and each application has an option to render Markdown with formatting, images, URLs, and more. Any number of files, such as images and PDFs, can be attached to a note, and notes can also be tagged. I started developing Joplin when Evernote changed its pricing model and because I wanted my 4,000+ notes to be stored in a more open format, free of any proprietary solution. To that end, I have developed three Joplin applications, all under the MIT License: for desktop (Windows, MacOS, and Linux), for mobile (Android and iOS), and for the terminal (Windows, MacOS, and Linux). All the applications have similar user interfaces and can synchronize with each other. They are based on open standards and technologies including SQLite and JavaScript for the backend, and Terminal Kit (Node.js), Electron, and React Native for the three front ends. Read more

Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

One after the other, Linux distributions are dropping 32-bit support. Or, to be accurate, they drop support for the Intel x86 32-bit architecture (IA-32). Indeed, computers based on x86_64 hardware (IA-64) are superior in every way to their 32-bits counterpart: they are more powerful, run faster, are more compact, and more energy efficient. Not mentioning their price has considerably decreased in just a few years. If you have the opportunity to switch to 64 bits, do it. But, to quote a mail I received recently from Peter Tribble, author of Tribblix: “[… ] in the developed world we assume that we can replace things; in some parts of the developing world older IA-32 systems are still the norm, with 64-bit being rare.” Read more