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About Tux Machines

Monday, 02 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Report: Open Source a Judgment Standard

Filed under
OSS

Open Source is changing the way that Gartner Group measures the application development market. The big loser as a result may well be proprietary Java application development tools.

NDISwrapper Setup Information for SUSE 10.x

Filed under
HowTos

First off, what is NDISwrapper? Shockingly enough, it's a wrapper for the NDIS layer of Windows. In plain English, it means you can use Windows XP drivers inside Linux to power your WIFI card. Very cool.

Yes, Virginia, there will be a Flash Player 9 for Linux

Filed under
Software

Yes, Adobe is actively working on the Linux version of Flash Player 9. We expect to make a pre-release version available on Adobe Labs for early feedback and testing before the end of the year, with the full release expected in early 2007*.

Full Blurb.

Release Candidate for Ubuntu 6.06 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu team is proud to announce the Release Candidate for version 6.06 LTS of Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Edubuntu - codenamed "Dapper Drake". We consider this release candidate complete, stable and suitable for testing by any user.

Easing migration with the OpenOffice.org menu and toolbar configuration tools

Filed under
HowTos

One of my blog readers reports that, when he migrated his organization to OpenOffice.org, he didn't even tell the users that they were switching to a different office suite. He just said that there was going to be a big upgrade. Then, he and his migration cohorts modified the OpenOffice.org menus and toolbars to resemble the Microsoft Office layout and phrasing as much as possible (without violating copyright, of course) and gave that configured version to the users. He reports very few problems with the migration.

45 Minutes to a Moodle Education Server

Filed under
HowTos

This beginner article provides step-by-step instructions for installing Moodle, a Learning Management System, on to a Fedora Linux server. It provides the steps necessary to setup a full powered intranet web-server that can support course listings, event calendars, student/teacher communication and much more. Best of all, a prototype server can be functional within about 45 minutes.

Create your own distribution torrents

Filed under
HowTos

The BitTorrent protocol has revolutionized peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing. It works by enabling users to download fragments of a large file from other users simultaneously, rather than waiting for one file to complete, thus speeding the download process. As a result, many popular Linux distributions have started releasing their ISOs through torrents, many of which you can find at LinuxTracker. But if your favourite distro doesn't offer a release torrent, why not make your own?

Setting Up a Server

Filed under
HowTos

This article teaches you, the reader, how to configure a GNU/Linux based server with three of the most important services that must be provided in a company, at home, a lab or anywhere else, both for clients and internal usage: web, database, mail.

Book review: Linux Patch Management by Michael Jang

Filed under
Reviews

In “Linux Patch Management�, Michael Jang describes in necessary detail how to achieve patch efficiency via tools such as apt-get, rpm and rsynch. His strength and skill at structuring the most relevant information can be seen throughout the book.

n/a

Automate Linux Installations with Debian Pre-Seeding (Part 2)

Filed under
HowTos

Plugging a new PC into your network, going out for a healthy walk, and returning to a completed operating system installation is one of life's little pleasures. Remember, laziness is a virtue in network administration. Hamsters spend their lives running the same circles. Network administrators automate repetitive tasks.

Mozilla: we'll pay developers where we can

Filed under
Moz/FF

The not-for-profit organisation says it is looking at how to share its newfound Mozillions (well, millions) with the volunteers who work on Firefox and Thunderbird.

What's next for the Portland project

Filed under
OSS

Following its recent Mainz, Germany meeting, the Portland project has now decided on its next moves. Portland, an ad hoc group of commercial and community Linux desktop developers, aims to create a common set of interfaces and tools to allow all applications to easily integrate with the Linux desktop.

Another office

Filed under
Reviews
OOo

At the outset, this article was written in OpenOffice Writer a word processor comparable to Microsoft Word. The Writer is just one part of the suite called OpenOffice.org touted as "open source" competition to Microsoft Office.

The original version was slow and clunky. However, with the latest version (2.0), OpenOffice.org has made it worthwhile to be written about.

Small Security Risk Still Big Selling Point for Linux

Filed under
Linux

Even companies hawking Linux antivirus products acknowledge that the operating system doesn't suffer from many security woes at this point. "Our product is more used to filtering Windows viruses than actual Linux viruses," said Ron O'Brien, an analyst at Sophos, a security firm in Abingdon, England.

Microsoft: OpenDocument is too slow

Filed under
OSS

The Office maker has taken a swing at the open source format, but the ODF Alliance says Open XML is not yet supported by any application so its performance can't even be measured.

Runit makes a speedy replacement for init

Filed under
HowTos

runit, a Unix init scheme with service supervision written by Gerrit Pape, is a complete replacement for SysVinit. Its key benefits include improved boot speed and ease of use. In the time that it takes you to read this article, you could move from init to runit.

Windows Vs. Linux

Filed under
Linux

So, what if you don’t like the way Windows is headed? You could abandon the PC altogether and go get yourself an Apple computer (which isn’t as much of a pocketbook hit as it used to be). What about Linux? Is there room in your heart for Linux?

How To Automate Spamcop Submissions

Filed under
HowTos

Spamcop is a service which provides RBLs for mailservers in order to reject incoming mail from spammers. Their philosophy is to process possible spam complaints from users. When they receive a certain amount of complaints during a time-period then they will blacklist the offender. This system is dependant on spam reporting from users. However, their submission process is not very user-friendly.

One of the worst operating system experiences ever encountered

Filed under
Microsoft
Reviews

VIRTUAL MICROSOFT employee, columnist Gary Krakow, says installing Vista Beta 2, "was one of the worst operating system experiences that I’ve ever encountered."

Also: Vista Needs More Fine-Tuning

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • Download Linux Voice issue 18
  • Windows desktop share falls below 90% [Ed: based on Microsoft-connected firm]
    The desktop share of Windows computers worldwide fell below 90 per cent for the first time since it established the mark, according to figures from the web analytics company Net Applications. While there were encouraging figures for Microsoft among the various Windows versions, the overall share fell to 89.23 per cent.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces Linux Kernel 4.6 RC6, Dubbed "Charred Weasel"
    It's Sunday night, so Linus Torvalds has announced the release of a new RC build for the upcoming Linux 4.6 kernel series, which has been dubbed "Charred Weasel." According to Linus Torvalds, things continue to remain fairly calm in the development cycle of Linux kernel 4.6, which might very well get one more Release Candidate (RC), version RC7, next week, on May 8, 2016. Then, one week later, on May 15, we should be able to get our hands on the final release of Linux kernel 4.6, which will hit the stable repositories of various distributions most probably around June 2016.
  • Reaper Audio Software Is Coming To Linux
    If Audacity and Ardour aren't cutting it for your audio editing needs on Linux, there's another Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) option coming to Linux: Reaper. Reaper is a high-end audio production software suite developed by Cockos Software. Reaper has been supported under Windows and OS X for this software that's been around since 2005. With the current development version, native Linux support is coming.
  • Plasma Mobile : New base system
    Last Akademy, the Plasma team revealed the first prototype of the new Plasma Mobile. [...] Our initial Ubuntu Touch base was Ubuntu 15.04. Eventually, our image started to diverge from the Ubuntu Touch base. For example, we upgraded libhybris to upstream version because libhybris available in Ubuntu archive diverged too much from upstream to be useful in our context. We also had to upgrade to a newer Qt version, and we also needed to upgrade the base system to Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) because we did not have the resources for managing different branches for packaging the latest git KF5/Plasma for 15.04.
  • Converging Kubes
    Kube, our PIM-Client in the making, is supposed to run on a variety of platforms and form-factors. We aim to provide a consistent look and feel across them all. If you know how to use Kube on your desktop machine, you will know how to use it on your Android phone or tablet as well. So what we are going to do, is building a UI for the phone, allowing it to display multiple pages on the tablet and in the end serving it on the desktop as well. Good idea, right?
  • openSUSE announces first round of accepted proposals
    The first round of proposals for the openSUSE Conference have been accepted and people who submitted a call for papers should log-in to events.opensuse.org and check to see if their talk has been accepted as part of the first round of proposals. For proposals that have been accepted, users should confirm their proposal as soon as possible and also register for the conference if they had not done so already.
  • Prepare your Raspberry Pi for space with an Astro Pi flight case
    One year ago this month, I published my first article on Opensource.com. I talked about our Astro Pi program in Students compete for a chance to have their Raspberry Pi code run in space. We've come a long way in that last 12 months—in December, our two Astro Pi units were sent to the International Space Station aboard the Cygnus spacecraft on a resupply mission; closely followed by British ESA astronaut Tim Peake.

Red Hat News

Android Leftovers

6 colleges turning out open source talent

Most IT departments have project road maps that will require open-source skills, but finding recent college grads with open source talent can be challenging. Whether your company is planning an open-source-based big data implementation, installing an open-platform file manager, or adopting an open approach to customer relationship management, experts say traditional computer science departments might not be turning out students you need. Read more