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Sunday, 04 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 06/01/2012 - 7:45am
Story Distro Hoppin`: Netrunner 4.0 Dryland srlinuxx 06/01/2012 - 7:14am
Story What's Coming For The Linux 3.3 Kernel DRM Pull srlinuxx 06/01/2012 - 7:10am
Story LinuxUser kernel column – a look back at 2011 srlinuxx 06/01/2012 - 5:54am
Story 20 Fun Things To Do Online When You’re Bored At Work srlinuxx 06/01/2012 - 5:52am
Story Ryan "Icculus" Gordon Has Some New Tools srlinuxx 06/01/2012 - 1:15am
Story Raspberry Pi Lands eBay Bidding Up To $2,700 USD srlinuxx 05/01/2012 - 9:43pm
Story Going All-FOSS With a New Computer srlinuxx 05/01/2012 - 9:42pm
Story Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 Source Code srlinuxx 05/01/2012 - 9:15pm
Story What's new in Linux 3.2 srlinuxx 1 05/01/2012 - 9:08pm

Eight reasons why Ubuntu is the Linux poster child

Filed under
Ubuntu
  1. Its large user base. Because Ubuntu is so popular, it becomes even more popular. This viral marketing was the same thing that made YouTube successful.

  2. Hardware support. One of the most common complaints among new Linux users is that their new hardware is not supported by any Linux distribution. Well, with Ubuntu, hardware support is added within days of the hardware coming out.

The KDE 3.5 Control Center - Part 2 - Desktop

Filed under
KDE

The Desktop section of the Control Center focuses on the functionality and layout of the desktop(s), the taskbar, and the windows themselves, how they function, behave and what features are turned on or off. This section mostly covers functionality and focuses very little on the actual "eyecandy" experience of the system.

The true nature of open source

Filed under
OSS

In the beginning…open source was pure and unadulterated. Over time, the idea of community-build software that is free and unfettered by sticky licensing terms and fees caught on with IT buyers, and the disruption of the old order began.

Learn how UNIX multitasks

Filed under
HowTos

On UNIX systems, each system and end-user task is contained within a process. Learn how to control processes and use a number of commands to peer into your system.

Review: Pardus Linux 2007

Filed under
Linux

Pardus is a GNU/Linux distribution funded and developed by the Scientific & Technological Research Council of Turkey. Installation is simple and not much packed with features. I realized it when the screen some thing that I could not understand Sad Then I rebooted again with installation CD and found that there is a language selection option to choose English and a few other languages also.

Ubuntu: Who Needs Vista?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Back in my university days, when Netscape was the latest web browser on the scene and the Pentium MMX was the power user’s processor of choice, UNIX was part of my everyday life. Since graduating, my chosen desktop operating system has been Windows of some variety.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 197

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

Browser aims to open up the web

Filed under
Moz/FF

The key developers behind forthcoming changes to the Firefox browser reveal their plans for how the popular program will change.

The difference between online and offline, the web and the desktop will blur in the near future, Mozilla's Mike Schroepfer has said.

Debian Etch: first impressions

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Debian deserves some extra attention. The latest release is being distributed and I have no doubt that it will be installed on quite a few machines over the coming days and weeks. Personally I want to try it on the iMac Indigo and on a virtual machine under VMware. The netinstal images were a breeze to download and that was enough for now.

Mandriva Spring 2007.1 Releases to Early Seeders

Filed under
MDV

Comme supposé hier soir, l'heure des Early Seeders est arrivée !

Trop tard pour moi, le coffre de la voiture est déjà plein. Les enfants sont installés. Il ne manque plus que le conducteur Smile

A bientôt.

More Here.

The Linux Foundation Announces LSB Update and New Testing Tools

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation has announced an update of the Linux Standard Base (LSB) and the release of a new testing toolkit. The update to LSB 3.1 introduces new automated testing toolkits for distributions and application vendors, linking development more closely to certification.

Bandwidth monitoring with vnStat

Filed under
HowTos

If you want to monitor and manage your Internet bandwidth, perhaps to make sure your ISP is not overbilling you, try vnStat, an open source, Linux-based application that gives you a clear picture of your bandwidth usage. This command-line application is simple to install and easy to use.

Firefox captures users with its add-on tools

Filed under
Moz/FF

Tens of millions of Internet users have switched to the Firefox Web browser, often for its protection from scammers and spyware writers who generally tailor their coded mischief for Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser.

But security isn't the only virtue to Firefox.

Mozilla: Why Desktop E-Mail Crucifies the Browser

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

In an era when applications are moving into the web browser, the maker of the world's most popular open-source e-mail client wants you to stay on the desktop. Later this month, Mozilla will release Thunderbird 2, the latest version of its cross-platform e-mail application. The current version, 1.5, has almost 50 million users worldwide and has been translated into 35 languages.

This Week's KDE Commit-Digest

Filed under
KDE
-s

This week in the KDE Commit-Digest we find some really nice goodies. Of course there are plenty of the less glamorous but quite necessary commits as well. All together, things are proceding along at an exciting pace.

Brasero does the CD burning job in GNOME

Filed under
Software

My system76 desktop machine came with a CD-RW/DVD-RW drive that I’ve finally got around to trying out. I wasn’t too concerned about how it would work with GNU/Linux, since I suspected CD and DVD burning should be relatively well-supported by now. Of course, you never know until you try.

openSUSE Linux : Helping the world avoid unnecessary agony

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

My brother and I presented our father with a new AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 3800+ machine that we got him for his birthday. He was excited and surprised, which came as no surprise.

Gaim nicer notifications with libnotify on Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy

Filed under
HowTos

Gaim (now renamed to Pidgin, but the version I’m using isn’t that new) comes with a “guifications” plugin to do “notifications”, those little popup “toast” messages to tell you that someone’s messaged you, someone’s logged on or off, all that sort of thing.

How To Build A New Freetype

Filed under
HowTos

I've had several requests for my RPM for freetype2 including sub-pixel rendering for openSUSE 10.2. So here are instructions on how to build your own, including my modified SPEC file. If you're in the USA it might be illegal to download my file, so this file is only for people who live in free countries. Or at least semi-free countries, like the UK.

1. Download freetype2 source rpm

Disabling unused daemons to speed up your boot sequence

Filed under
HowTos

Many Linux distros usually start a lot of daemons when booting, resulting in a long wait before you can get to work after powering on your machine. Some of those daemons are rarely used (or even not al all) by the majority of users. This tutorial describes how to disable unused or rarely used daemons in a proper way, resulting in faster boot sequences and less CPU load.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

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