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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Flashback: The Future of the Web 1995-Style srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 5:21pm
Story Jokosher: A Completely Kosher Audio Multitool srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:44pm
Story Space Exploration Gets Open Sourced srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:42pm
Story Web browsers safer than you think srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:41pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 7:48am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 7:37am
Story Mageia 1 Review srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:59am
Story The Subverted GPL srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:58am
Story LibreOffice Developer Glimpse Proves Balance srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:56am
Story Matt Asay FUDs Google srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:55am

Rivals attack Vista as illegal under EU rules

Filed under
Microsoft

A coalition of rivals charged on Friday that Microsoft Corp.'s new Vista operating system coming out next week will perpetuate practices found illegal in the European Union nearly three years ago.

Also: Windows Vista - How Would You Like to be Screwed Today?
And: Linux Dodges Microsoft In Retail Vertical Space

Kurumin Linux 7.0 Light Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Kurumin Linux is a distribution we had never heard of prior to today's encounter. The latest Kurumin release, Light 7.0, is a mini LiveCD that is targeted for Brazilian users and is based on Debian/Knoppix.

Those Screenshots.

Inside PC-BSD 1.3

Filed under
Interviews
BSD

PC-BSD 1.3 was released on New Year's Eve. Dru Lavigne interviewed three members of the PC-BSD release engineering team regarding the new release and their involvement within the PC-BSD community.

Passive entertainment with Democracy TV

Filed under
Software

When it comes to bandwidth eaters, there's one kid on the block that will have you biting off more than you can chew. Its fun. Its addictive. Its open source. Its Democracy TV.

Using the nvidia binary driver with Xen on Debian etch

Filed under
HowTos

I recently set up Xen 3.0.3 on Debian etch using the great guide here from this site. However, if (like me) you use the binary Nvidia X.org driver rebooting into your new XenLinux kernel your X.org server will fail to start. If you read its error output, you will see that this is because it cannot find the nvidia kernel module. Here we'll show how to fix things.

Selling open source just keeps getting easier

Filed under
OSS

One way to know that the open source market is maturing is to analyze how fast companies are able to get to significant revenues. By "significant" I mean $10M and on a sharp, upward ramp. When I started in the business of open source (2000, with Lineo), it was horribly difficult to pull in $1M in revenues, much less $10M. Now? The ink will still be dry on your VC term sheets when you cross that threshold. Really.

Review: Geeklog delivers a portal in a box

Filed under
Reviews

It's called "The Ultimate Weblog System," and if you can shear off some of the hyperbole in that you'll find that the quick-to-install Geeklog does provide what it claims: a Web portal with all the trimmings, and all of it working right "out of the box."

Manage SSH Tunnels with Gnome SSH Tunnel Manager

Filed under
HowTos

gSTM, the Gnome SSH Tunnel Manager, is a front-end for managing SSH-tunneled port redirects. It stores tunnel configurations in a simple XML format. The tunnels, with local and remote port redirections, can be created, deleted, modified, and individually started and stopped through one simple interface. It is useful for anyone wanting to securely access private services over an encrypted tunnel.

The Replacements

Filed under
HowTos

If you've used Perl longer than 15 minutes, you've no doubt seen (and probably typed) the extremely useful substitute operation, typically appearing as s/old/new/. Let's look at some of the things you may already know, and perhaps a few things that you don't know yet about this very common operation.

Ubuntu Studio: An All-Free Visual Production Suite for Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Studio, due in April, promises to put a full, completely open-source graphics package together for Linux. The OS and apps will all be bundled together for easy installation.

Open source, closed mind

Filed under
OSS

It is a theme popular in science fiction films where the romantic idealism of free information is part of a rebellion against the monopolists of information technology.

Using monkey’s audio (.ape) files in ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

To be able to work with .ape audio files, you need to compile and install the “mac” program which isn’t available in the ubuntu repositories.

Linux Foundation: Corporate Lackey or Linux Savior?

Filed under
Linux

The recent merging of two leading open source groups, OSDL and FSG, seems like good news for Linux. However, out in the Linux community, flickers of doubt were heard. Skepticism. Anxiety. Uncharitable postings on message boards.

KDE 3.5.6 Released with New Features, Translations and Fixes

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Project today announced the immediate availability of KDE 3.5.6, a maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop for GNU/Linux and other UNIXes.

Savage: The Battle for Newerth

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

Savage: The Battle for Newerth, created and released by S2Games in the Summer of 2003, is a unique FPS/RTS online game. It combines first and third person combat with RTS elements such as structures, AI workers, and a team commander. On a good online server up to 64 players can easily play without any lag.

OpenXML sneaks up behind ODF - lets make it stop

Filed under
OSS

It seems that Microsoft are working to “fast track” their OpenXML format to become a new European ISO/IEC standard. So what do we do? Well, we have until 5th Feb 2007 to make complaints.

Red Hat's Volley on Linux Management Offering

Filed under
Linux

Call it Red Hat's forward spin velocity regarding Linux management tools. With competition such as Oracle offering full Red Hat support on their own products, Red Hat is now expanding and improving its Linux management footprint.

A Vista vs. Linux matchup

Filed under
OS

In this multi-part series, DesktopLinux.com columnist and operating system curmudgeon Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols pits Microsoft's latest wares -- Vista -- against Linux's fair haired boy -- Ubuntu -- to see how the pinnacle of commercial desktop operating systems stacks up against the free, community-developed Linux upstart.

Also: Desktop Linux 2006: The Year in Review

Penguin Prophecies

Filed under
Linux

It’s that time of year — the time when every IT pundit worth his or her salt is required to publish a New Year’s list of predictions or resolutions. So, being Linux Magazine’s equivalent of Professor Marvel (from the 1939 film classic The Wizard of Oz), who has a talent for seeing the patently obvious, I’m here to take my shot.

PCLinuxOS, Distros, and 10 reasons to try PCLinuxOS.

Filed under
Linux

I wonder if there is a survey that has information on how many different distros a typical Linux user has used over that last 5 years? Of course, I mean more than just an install trial where you experiment with a distro for a few days, then wipe or replace that distro.

For me, that number is a fairly conservative two. And one of those two distros is the (grown up) child of another.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat, Logicalis in digital transformation partnership in Latin America
    PromonLogicalis, a provider of information technology and communication solutions and services in Latin America, and Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, announced a collaboration that aim to help organizations navigate the digital transformation of their infrastructures to pave the way for cloud and the software-defined technologies, and to advance open source technology awareness in the region. Open source is delivering significant advancements in many areas of technology through community-powered innovation, including cloud computing, mobile, big data, and more. And, as companies embrace modern technology as a competitive advantage via digital transformation efforts, many are turning to open source because of the flexibility and agility it can enable.
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Downgraded by Zacks Investment Research to “Hold”
  • An Easy Way To Try Intel & RADV Vulkan Drivers On Fedora 24
    Fedora 25 should have good support for the open-source Vulkan Linux drivers (particularly if it lands the next Mesa release) while Fedora 24 users can now more easily play with the latest Mesa Git RADV and Intel ANV Vulkan drivers via a new repository. A Phoronix reader has setup a Fedora Copr repository that is building Intel's Vulkan driver from Mesa Git plus the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver re-based from its source (David Airlie's semi-interesting GitHub branch). Fedora COPR, for the uninformed, is the distribution's equivalent to Ubuntu PPA repositories.
  • Meeting users, lots of users
    Every year, I introduce Fedora to new students at Brno Technical University. There are approx. 500 of them and a sizable amount of them then installs Fedora. We also organize a sort of installfest one week after the presentation where anyone who has had any difficulties with Fedora can come and ask for help. It’s a great opportunity to observe what things new users struggle with the most. Especially when you have such a high number of new users. What are my observations this year?

Linux Devices

  • 96Boards SBCs host Intel Joule and Curie IoT modules
    Gumstix announced two SBCs this week, based on Intel Joule and Curie IoT modules and built to 96Boards CE and IE form-factor specifications, respectively. At Linaro Connect Las Vegas 2016, where earlier this week Linaro’s 96Boards.org announced a new 96Boards IoT Edition (IE) spec, Gumstix announced support for 96Boards.org’s open SBC standards with two new single-board computers. Both SBCs will be available for purchase in October.
  • ORWL — First Open Source And Physically Secure PC, Runs Linux And Windows
    ORWL is the first open source, physically secure computer. Using a secure microcontroller (MCU) and an ‘active clamshell mesh’, the device makes sure that nobody breaks the security of the system. Its maker, Design Shift, has also launched a crowdfunding campaign on Crowd Supply.
  • Purism Is Still Hoping To Build A GNU/Linux Free Software Librem Smartphone
    Purism, the startup behind the Librem laptops with a focus on free software and user privacy/freedom, still has their minds set on coming up with a GNU/Linux smartphone. Purism continues selling their high-priced laptops and their Librem 11 is forthcoming as an Intel-based tablet/convertible device with stocking station. Next on their horizon they want to produce "the ideal no-carrier, Free Software phone running a bona fide GNU+Linux stack."

Leftovers: OSS

  • Asterisk 14 Improves Open-Source VoIP
    Digium, the lead commercial sponsor behind the Asterisk open source PBX project announced the release Asterisk 14 this week, continuing to evolve the decade old effort, making it easier to use and deploy.
  • Yahoo open-sources a deep learning model for classifying pornographic images
    Yahoo today announced its latest open-source release: a model that can figure out if images are specifically pornographic in nature. The system uses a type of artificial intelligence called deep learning, which involves training artificial neural networks on lots of data (like dirty images) and getting them to make inferences about new data. The model that’s now available on GitHub under a BSD 2-Clause license comes pre-trained, so users only have to fine-tune it if they so choose. The model works with the widely used Caffe open source deep learning framework. The team trained the model using its now open source CaffeOnSpark system. The new model could be interesting to look at for developers maintaining applications like Instagram and Pinterest that are keen to minimize smut. Search engine operators like Google and Microsoft might also want to check out what’s under the hood here. “To the best of our knowledge, there is no open source model or algorithm for identifying NSFW images,” Yahoo research engineer Jay Mahadeokar and senior director of product management Gerry Pesavento wrote in a blog post.
  • Cloudera, Hortonworks, and Uber to Keynote at Apache Big Data and ApacheCon Europe
  • Vendors Pile on Big Data News at Strata
    Cloudera, Pentaho and Alation are among vendors making Big Data announcements at this week's Strata event. Vendors big and small are making news at this week's Strata + Hadoop event as they try to expand their portion of the Big Data market. Cloudera highlighted a trio of Apache Software Foundation (ASF) projects to which it contributes. Among them is Spark 2.0, which benefits from a new Dataset API that offers the promise of better usability and performance as well as new machine learning libraries.
  • New alliances focus on open-source, data science empowerment
    How can data science make a true market impact? Partnerships, particularly amongst open source communities. As IBM solidifies its enterprise strategies around data demands, two new partnerships emerge: one with Continuum Analytics, Inc., advancing open-source analytics for the enterprise; and another with Galvanize, initiating a Data Science for Executives program. Continuum Analytics, the creator and driving force behind Anaconda — a leading open data science platform powered by Python — has allied with IBM to advance open-source analytics for the enterprise. Data scientists and data engineers in open-source communities can now embrace Python and R to develop analytic and machine learning models in the Spark environment through its integration with IBM’s DataWorks Project. The new agreement between IBM and Galvanize, which provides a dynamic learning community for technology, will offer an assessment, analysis and training element for Galvanize’s Data Science for Executives program. This program empowers corporations to better understand, use and maximize the value of their data. The program will support IBM’s DataFirst Method, a methodology that IBM says provides the strategy, expertise and game plan to help ensure enterprise customers’ succeed on their journey to become a data-driven business.
  • Apache Spot: open source big data analytics for cyber
  • Chinese open source blockchain startup Antshares raises $4.5M through crowdsourcing [Ed: Microsoft-connected]
  • August and September 2016: photos from Pittsburgh and Fresno
  • Libre Learn Lab: a summit on freely licensed resources for education
    Libre Learn Lab is a two-day summit for people who create, use and implement freely licensed resources for K-12 education, bringing together educators, policy experts, software developers, hardware hackers, and activists to share best practices and address the challenges of widespread adoption of these resources in education. The 2nd biennial conference is Saturday, October 8th, and Sunday, October 9th, at the MIT Tang Center. The keynote addresses will be delivered by the FSF’s own Richard M. Stallman, former Chief Open Education Advisor Andrew Marcinek and founder of HacKIDemia Stefania Druga. At the event, there will be a special tribute to Dr. Seymour Papert (the father of educational computing) by Dr. Cynthia Solomon.

Security Leftovers

  • Friday's security advisories
  • ICANN grinds forward on crucial DNS root zone signing key update
    The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers is moving -- carefully -- to upgrade the DNS root zone key by which all domains can be authenticated under the DNS Security Extensions protocol. ICANN is the organization responsible for managing the Domain Name System, and DNS Security Extensions (DNSSEC) authenticates DNS responses, preventing man-in-the-middle attacks in which the attacker hijacks legitimate domain resolution requests and replaces them with fraudulent domain addresses. DNSSEC still relies on the original DNS root zone key generated in 2010. That 1024-bit RSA key is scheduled to be replaced with a 2048-bit RSA key next October. Although experts are split over the effectiveness of DNSSEC, the update of the current root zone key signing key (KSK) is long overdue.
  • Cybersecurity isn't an IT problem, it's a business problem
    The emergence of the CISO is a relatively recent phenomenon at many companies. Their success often relies upon educating the business from the ground up. In the process, companies become a lot better about how to handle security and certainly learn how not to handle it. As a CIO, knowing the pulse of security is critical. I oversee a monthly technology steering committee that all the executives attend. The CISO reports during this meeting on the state of the security program. He also does an excellent job of putting risk metrics out there, color coded by red, yellow, and green. This kind of color grading allows us to focus attention on where we are and what we’re doing about it.