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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ZaReason CEO Sounds Off on Linux, Hardware ‘Compatibility’ srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 5:30pm
Story Giving a Clunky Old CMS the WordPress Treatment srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 5:28pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 7:02am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 6:48am
Story Visually See The Contents Of A Folder Or Hard Drive With Baobab srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 6:41am
Story Pardus 2011.2 review srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 3:28am
Story Winds of Change... srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 3:27am
Story FSF Relaunches Software Directory srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 3:26am
Story Instant Messaging With Kopete srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 12:08am
Story Open Source Desktop Publishing 2011 srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 12:05am

Novell has loss, missing Wall Street target

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Novell Inc. reported a quarterly loss on Thursday, missing Wall Street forecasts as the business software maker's sales fell and it took a charge for a consulting unit that it aims to sell.

Why console apps still rock

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I know there’s a portion of Ubuntu (and other distro) users who resent six virtual consoles running at a time, in addition to the X desktop in a default Ubuntu setup. I would agree that six is probably overkill, but removing them completely would be nuts.

Playing Classic Games

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Many of us do still remember the Alley Cat and Mario and Contra and other classic games we used to play whether on Nintendo NES or DOS or SNES, these games were simple compared to todays games but were very entertaining nonetheless. In this article i describe how to play these games on your Ubuntu box.

Any objections? For Open XML standard, yes (still)

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Microsoft Corp.’s Open XML file format cleared a small hurdle Wednesday, after documents released by the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) showed fewer countries harboring strong objections than had been expected.

Fosdem Slides Highlight New openSUSE Features

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Andreas Jaeger presented slides at Fosdem 2007 on highlights of the major new features of openSUSE 10.3. One idea is to provide a minimal install of a base system and complete the remaining over the network to reduce downloading and media waste. Other key areas are performance improvements and early KDE 4 adoption.

Allowing Limited Sudo Access With Visudo

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If you’ve used your Ubuntu machine for more than a week you’ve probably run into the sudo command. Now what happens when you have another user on that machine that needs certain superuser privileges but you don’t want to give them FULL access?

Fedora cleans its repositories, considers move to Free Software

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The Red Hat-sponsored Fedora project is undergoing several changes before the release of its next version. In preparation for Fedora 7, which will fuse the Core and Extra software repositories, Fedora's developers are auditing the repositories for non-free and non-open software that doesn't meet the project's guidelines. Eventually, the project may change its package guidelines to only allow Free Software.

Choice or Chaos? The High Cost of Linux Fragmentation

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Freedom of choice is one of the great benefits of Open Source Software in general and Linux in particular. However, a couple of announcements this week seem to indicate that market value of freedom of choice has dipped considerably. The biggest hurdle Linux adoption faced this week wasn't Microsoft, it was an enemy from within: Linux fragmentation.

Don’t Use Yum To Update To Fedora 7!

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The update from one Fedora version to the next by yum was never officially supported - however, given that you were brave enough it could work out. However, for the next Fedora version you shouldn’t try it because you might even make your system unbootable!

PCLinuxOS Magazine March 2007 Issue 7 Released!

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It is my privilege to announce on behalf of the team members of the PCLinuxOS Magazine Project sponsored by, the March 2007 issue (#7)  is available for download!  Our previous issues can also be downloaded.

Mozilla Firefox Wins Anti-Spam Award

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Mozilla Firefox, a free, open-source web browser for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X, has long had a loyal cult following. Now Datamation’s readers have taken notice, choosing Firefox – narrowly – to win its Product of the Year award in the Anti-Spam category.

Eric Raymond: Yes, "open source" is still meaningful

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Writing in O'Reilly's Radar, Nat Torkington argues that the term "open source" is becoming meaningless. He points to SugarCRM's badgeware, through which, he claims, only two-thirds of their code is downloadable, and rPath and MontaVista, which "sell software that works on Linux but the software itself isn't actually open source."

Using squidGuard for content filtering

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Content filtering for the Web can be a messy proposition. A business may need to block only the most objectionable Web sites, while schools may be required by law to follow a more thorough process. Whatever your needs, you can build a solution with only open source pieces: squid, squidGuard, and blacklists.

Dell censors IdeaStorm Linux dissent

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It seems pointless seeking ideas and feedback if you’re going to ignore and delete the ones you don’t like. That’s exactly what Dell is doing with its IdeaStorm web site, which has been set up by the company to solicit ideas and feedback.

Tamil Nadu gets dual-boot Win-Linux desktops

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The Indian state of Tamil Nadu has finalized a tender for 40,000 Lenovo desktops which can be installed with both Novell's Suse Linux and Microsoft's Windows XP Starter Edition.

Safeguarding the Keys to the Linux Kingdom

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Without proper controls, anyone with access to the root account -- the virtual "keys to the kingdom" -- is given complete super-user privileges without justification based on their job classification, specific duties or role within the IT department. This violates the security best-practices doctrine of least privilege, and can expose proprietary systems and information to malicious activity and sabotage.

extract audio from video or online stream

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You can easily extract audio from video files such as avi, mpg, even flv! into mp3 uses either mplayer or ffmpeg. You can even record online stream into mp3, such as stream from radio cast.

Automate GUI testing with TestNG-Abbot

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TestNG-Abbot is a testing framework that breathes new life into testing GUI components. Understand the scenario and you'll find it surprisingly easy to isolate GUI components and then verify them using the framework's handy fixture objects.

Graphs in LaTeX using GNU Octave

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I finished two assignments in my crappy ME 410 statics class that involved me making graphs and writing out equations on a computer. For the first one I used OpenOffice and it was really ghetto; I was determined to do a “proper one” for the second assignment, and so I went out to learn LaTeX and how to generate graphs using GNU Octave.

Automatic patch management with PatchQuest in a home environment

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Patch management has become an area of concern for business networks and home networks as well. Updates and patches are continually developed by vendors to improve their solutions. Most network administrators would know the chaos resulting from the release of a new critical patch. PatchQuest is patch management software that frees administrators from manually managing patches for their existing Windows/Linux installations. Linux-Tip tested the free edition , which can manage up to 5 computers.

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More in Tux Machines

DevOps Handbook and Course

Leftovers: Gaming

Android Leftovers

  • Off We Go: Oracle Officially Appeals Google's Fair Use Win
    It was only a matter of time until this happened, but Oracle has officially appealed its fair use Java API loss to the Federal Circuit (CAFC). As you recall, after a years-long process, including the (correct) ruling that APIs are not covered by copyright being ridiculously overturned by CAFC, a new trial found that even if APIs are copyright-eligible, Google's use was covered by fair use. Oracle then tried multiple times to get Judge William Alsup to throw out the jury's ruling, but failed. In fact, on Oracle's second attempt to get Alsup to throw out the jury's ruling, citing "game changing" evidence that Google failed to hand over important information on discovery, it actually turned out that Oracle's lawyers had simply failed to read what Google had, in fact, handed over.
  • On iMessage’s Stickiness
  • Physical RAM attack can root Android and possibly other devices [Ed: Memory flipping is not at all an Android problem]

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Enterprise Open Source Programs Flourish -- In Tech and Elsewhere
    If you cycled the clock back about 15 years and surveyed the prevailing beliefs about open source technology at the time, you would find nowhere near the volume of welcome for it that we see today. As a classic example, The Register reported all the way back in 2001 that former CEO of Microsoft Steve Ballmer made the following famous statement in a Chicago Sun-Times interview: "Linux is a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches."
  • 5 More Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    In part one of this series, I covered my top five reasons to love Kubernetes, the open source container orchestration platform created by Google. Kubernetes was donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation in July of 2015, where it is now under development by dozens of companies including Canonical, CoreOS, Red Hat, and more. My first five reasons were primarily about the project’s heritage, ease of use, and ramp-up. The next five get more technical. As I mentioned in part one, choosing a distributed system to perform tasks in a datacenter is much more complex than looking at a spreadsheet of features or performance. And, you should make your decision based on your own needs and team dynamics. However, this top 10 list will give you my perspective, as someone who has been using, testing, and developing systems for a while now.
  • Bankers plan to give Corda blockchain code to Hyperledger project
  • Are European Banks Falling Behind in Blockchain Development?
  • Hyperledger adds 10 new members to support open source distributed ledger framework
    The Linux Foundation's Hyperledger project has announced that 10 new members have joined the project in order to help create an open standard for distributed ledgers for a new generation of transactional applications.
  • The Blockchain Created By Ethereum's Fork is Forking Now
    A blockchain that was born out of the rejection of a contentious technical change is on the cusp of making a decision some argue contradicts its core values. That's the situation the developers behind ethereum classic face ahead of a hard fork expected to be enacted on its blockchain on 25th October (should network participants approve the upgrade). Originally formed in reaction to a decision by the ethereum community to edit its "immutable" ledger, the fork caused an ideological schism among its enthusiasts. Alarmed by the action (or seeing a chance to profit by continuing the original network), miners and speculators began running its blockchain, which developers named "ethereum classic". Other investors then bought into the vision, and today, there are currently 85m classic ethers (ETC) worth $87m.
  • Red Hat: OpenStack moving beyond the proof-of-concept phase
    Red Hat’s annual poll found that 43 percent of respondents have deployed the cloud platform in production, compared to just 16 percent one year ago. The company reckons the increase reflects efforts by the community to address complexity and deployment issues that were previously known to have been a major roadblock to adoption. The study also noted that the steep learning curve for deploying OpenStack is being addressed as a growing number of engineers become certified to operate the platform. In addition, Red Hat cited cloud native application development as another driving force in enterprise adoption of OpenStack.
  • OpenStack Summit Emphasizes Security, Interoperability
    From security to interoperabilty to use cases and everything in-between, this week's OpenStack Summit from Oct. 25 to 28 in Barcelona, is set to illuminate the cloud. This year's event, which brings together vendors, operators and developers of the open-source cloud platform, will offer more sessions than ever before on securing OpenStack clouds. The Barcelona Summit follows the release of the OpenStack Newton milestone, which debuted on Oct. 6. While discussions about the most recent release are always part of every OpenStack Summit, so too are case-studies from operators of OpenStack clouds.
  • A complete view into application security must include open source [Ed: Black Duck spam (self-promotional marketing) takes form of FOSS FUD, as usual]
  • While Other Cities Go Linux, Toronto Bets Big on Microsoft Software [Ed: Toronto joins the Dark Forces]
    "" The partnership between Microsoft and the city of Toronto certainly comes at the right time, as other authorities across the world already announced decisions to give up on Windows and Office and replace them with open-source alternatives. Munich is the city that started the entire trend, but it wasn’t at all a smooth transition. Some of the local officials proposed a return to Microsoft software, claiming that training and assistance actually impacted productivity and explaining that in the end it all pays off to use Microsoft software because of the familiarity that users experience, which translates to a substantial productivity boost. And yet, the transition off Microsoft products is happening and more authorities are willing to do it, not necessarily because of the costs, but also due to security concerns, as is the case of Russia.
  • Open-Source Toolkit Lets Communities Build Their Own Street Furniture
    Despite the vast amount of customization options technology has allotted us, it can still be difficult to create projects that are community-centric. For example, though 3D printing can help us personalize our own jewelry, it has limited use for outfitting parks with trash cans or equipping bus stops with comfortable seating. Still, hyper-customizable tech has taught us the convenience of managing our own products, eliminating the bureaucratic complications of mass produced, production-line assembly. Leveraging this ideology to better the community, the Better Block Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to building local communities, has developed an open-source toolkit for creating a variety of fixtures for communities. The platform, called Wikiblock, allows designs ranging from benches to beer garden fences to be downloaded and taken to a maker space where a computer-aided machine can print the design from plywood. Similar to Ikea’s simplistic, DIY approach, the printed wood can be assembled by hand, without glue or nails.
  • How to make a lighted, porch bag for Halloween
    While I typically go all out for Halloween decorations every year, I'll admit I'm feeling tired this year. I still wanted to delight the neighborhood kids with simple details, so I decided to make lighted bags for my front porch railing this year. If you are someone who has a paper cutting machine like the Silhouette, this project will likely be a lot easier. Simply import the SVG file, resize for whatever size box you want, cut out, and assemble. However, for those of you who don't have one, I've included instructions on how to make this project without any machine at all. The box was created with the help of artists who share their art at OpenClipArt. I also used Inkscape to create the SVG file. If you don't like bats, you could modify the SVG file to include other types of clipart in the center of the bag.