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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 08/06/2013 - 2:41pm
Poll Ubuntu srlinuxx 08/06/2013 - 1:21pm
Story The Wayland Situation: Facts About X vs. Wayland srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:02pm
Story The trouble with UEFI Boot, and a helping hand from a BIOS firmware update srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:01pm
Story Why we need an Anti-Virus in Linux? srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:00pm
Story Kernel Log: Coming in 3.10 (Part 1) srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 9:17pm
Story Ubuntu holds its own srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:42pm
Story Fedora Day Two: Customisation srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:39pm
Story Young maker says Raspberry Pi is way to go srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:38pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 4:43am

MEPIS 7.0 Beta1 is Available For Testing

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: MEPIS has announced the upload of the first official Beta of the upcoming 7.0 release of SimplyMEPIS. Version 6.9.60beta1 for 32 and 64 bit processors is available from the testing directory at the MEPIS subscriber site and the MEPIS public mirrors.

Turn Apache into a collaborative authoring platform with mod_dav

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Ever thought about how nice it would be if you could edit the files stored on your Web server directly without the cumbersome download-edit-upload routine? Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV) is the way to do it.

sudo changes, the good way

Filed under
Software

beranger: As "potentially dangerous" is a more or less infinite set these days, OpenBSD 4.2 will get a better approach to sudo.

Gutsy and openSUSE 10.3 Beta1: Part2

Filed under
Ubuntu

laserjock.wordpress: The response to my first post was pretty overwhelming. I’ve got a little bit more openSUSE experience under my belt and wanted to talk a bit more about Gutsy:

graphical disk usage and statistics using filelight

Filed under
Software

vertito.blogspot: We all know most user's desktop runs and boots operating system from their harddisk. Simply from a harddisk, which is usually composed of files and folders. But trying to think how these data are scattered out or organized and logically located without overwriting each other and knowing where the other sector part ends and continued from your harddisk would be almost impossible for an average desktop user like me! And the light shows up.

early bird howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Configure Apt Sources.List - For Complete Newbies

  • Howto setup a print server for Windows (and others) using CUPS and zeroconf
  • Generating md5 encrypted password for chpasswd

Virgin America migrates to Red Hat Linux

Filed under
Linux

computerweekly: The website has selected Red Hat Enterprise Linux as the platform to support the website, after previously using the less scalable Red Hat-sponsored Fedora open-source solution.

Also: Linux security holes identified

Two tools for enabling wireless cards

Filed under
Software

linux.com: No other hardware nowadays supports GNU/Linux as weakly as wireless network adapters. Between the constant release of new models and major vendors who are uninterested in supporting the operating system, free drivers for wireless cards are next to impossible to reverse engineer. Nor can you find many retailers willing to customize laptops as readily as they do workstations. In this situation, ndiswrapper and the Broadcom firmware cutter provide a functional, if not always satisfactory, solution.

Ubuntu 7.04 (feisty) on a Thinkpad T61P

Filed under
Ubuntu

Michael R Head: Finally got Ubuntu running on the T61P (which has assumed the name of my last laptop which is in the process of having the contents of its hard drive transplanted). I encountered some issues in the process of doing this.

Could Linux become the dominant OS?

Filed under
Linux

the register: The trends suggest that Linux will become the dominant OS - the commodity OS - both for the PC and the server, to the eventual detriment of Microsoft's revenues.

Linux text editors: Do any make the grade?

Filed under
Software

computerworld: Linux buffs tend to scoff at one of the major reasons that Windows users like me haven't switched yet: We don't want to give up our favorite applications. With countless open-source options, plus a rising number of commercial apps for Linux, their argument goes, we can certainly find a replacement for whatever software we're running on XP or Vista. But, Linux fans, it's not so simple.

Bruce Perens Declines 60 Minutes Interview

Filed under
Reiser

technocrat.net: 60 Minutes called yesterday regarding the Hans Reiser story - Reiser is a brilliant filesystem developer and is about to go to trial.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How can I make dd give me a progress report?

  • Linux Testers Wanted for EVE Online
  • Red Hat in talks with states for open source solution
  • Is Open-Source A Business Model? $500 Million Says It Is
  • An Interview with Matt Asay
  • MIT’s ‘$100 laptops’ to go to Pacific islands
  • Xandros dance with Microsoft turns to a smooch
  • What made Kevin’s jaw hit the floor today?

Minty Dell(icious)

Filed under
Linux

Steve Carl (bmc blogs): Success with one Dell leads to trying another. The "old" Dell also runs Linux like it was made for it. Oh. Wait. Linux is made for almost everything.

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 updated

Filed under
Linux

debian.net: The Debian project has updated the stable distribution Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (codename Etch). This update adds security updates to the stable release, together with a few corrections to serious problems.

Manage your photos with digiKam

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftware mag: It’s been said that for a free software desktop to succeed it needs to address the needs of the average home user. Managing digital photographs is just one of those needs. Let’s see how one of the more popular free software photo management applications, digiKam, measures up.

KDE 4: cursor themes, LinuxMCE, some impressions

Filed under
KDE

liquidat: Current KDE 4 SVN has an improvement that makes it possible to change the cursor theme without re-starting X. Also, the LinuxMCE team now officially cooperates with KDE to merge technology where it makes sense. I also took some general KDE 4 screenshots to gather some impressions.

Also: Raptor Menu flip Effect

Linux: Moving 4K Stacks Forward

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In a series of 5 patches, Jesper Juhl propsed moving 4K stacks from a debug feature to a non-debug feature, defaulting it to be enabled in the -mm tree.

Information sharing at the NSA (video)

Filed under
Misc

linux.com: The topic of information sharing among US intelligence agencies, the FBI, and other federal agencies has attracted attention since 9/11. At Defcon XV, I had the opportunity to ask Tony Sager, chief of the National Security Agency's Vulnerability Analysis and Operations Group, about information sharing within the agency.

Linux Mint Takes on a KDE Flavor

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Linux Mint, a community Linux distribution that includes some proprietary elements for a better "out of the box" user experience, is now available in an edition with KDE as its desktop environment.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics