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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Open-Source DisplayPort MST Is Under Review Rianne Schestowitz 21/05/2014 - 8:00am
Story Mesa 10.1.4 Rianne Schestowitz 21/05/2014 - 6:43am
Story Red Hat's OpenStack moment: Just like Linux in 2003? Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2014 - 6:04am
Story The Mac-ifying of the Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2014 - 5:45am
Story Fedora Shake Up, Linus Interviewed, and Mint 16 Reviewed Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2014 - 5:34am
Story Security's future belongs to open source Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2014 - 5:13am
Story Rugged, wildly modular tablet runs Android and Linux Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2014 - 5:08am
Story Android mini-PC taps quad-core Rockchip, cools itself Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2014 - 5:05am
Story Introducing the GTK+ inspector tool for Application Developers Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 10:14pm
Story Clonezilla Live 2.2.3-10 Is Now Stable and Based on Linux Kernel 3.14.4 Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 10:05pm

Linux thriving in an anti-Windows Vista market

Filed under
Linux

tech.blorge.com: An anti-market has grown up around Windows Vista that was made possible by largely by its haphazard design and high price tag. But that works well for Linux, which is enjoying some strong sales growth at Novell.

Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron Alpha 5

Filed under
Ubuntu

distro-review.com: It's getting to the point where I should just rename "April" and "October" on my calandar "Ubuntu!" because that's what it just boils down to. If you have any interest in the state of open source software then you'll know that Ubuntu tends to be the benchmark.

When geeks and graffiti combine

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom.com: There is a lot of geeky graffiti out there. Some are just scribbles on a wall (programmer art being as it is), and some definitely qualify as artwork.

Refocusing LinuxWorld

LinuxToday: It may seem a bit weird to start a discussion about the LinuxWorld Conference and Expo (LWCE) so early in the year, but the topic came up because a friend of mine in the "biz" IM'ed me yesterday and asked if I was going to attend the Open Source Business Conference (OSBC). To me, the OSBC epitomizes what LWCE would be like without the developers and user community in attendance.

Graphics and Free Software: a great 2007, but where is OpenGL?

Filed under
Software

liquidat.wordpress: 2007 was probably The Year Of Free Graphics: AMD/ATI’s specs, a new totally Mesa , output hotplugging via XRandR and the announcement of new shiny OpenGL specs. While this all was truly great, the OpenGL releases never happened, and there are no updates on the topic.

URPMI + RPM5 = True

Filed under
MDV

Per Øyvind Karlsen: I've just finished porting urpmi (and rpmtools) to rpm 5.0, making it the first dependency solver supporting rpm 5.0! There seems to be less regressions with rpm5 currently, this was surprising considering it being a quite recent major release.

Getting Excited About KDE4

Filed under
KDE

linuxappfinder.com: A year ago I was really excited about KDE4, but the lack of some basic features I found whenever I tried a release candidate soured me a bit. I still loved the vision. When the February update showed up in Kubuntu I decided to give it another go. Now I'm happy that I did.

Fight The Power: Greening Your Linux Systems

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: Linux has a lot of advantages as a desktop operating system. Power management, unfortunately, still is not one of them. But there are plenty of ways to make a Linux system less power-hungry -- and some of the most effective fixes are also some of the easiest.

Cool Desktop Linux Applications (Part 1): Internet and networking applications

Filed under
Software

linuxondesktop.blogspot: Desktop Linux has seen tremendous growth over the past few years and with this there has also been tremendous growth in number of applications relevant for desktop use available. Now most of the Linux distributions because of either space constraint or well because of licensing issue do not include many really cool applications.

End of life for Debian 3.1

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: One year after the release of Debian GNU/Linux 4.0, codenamed ‘etch’, and nearly three years after the release of Debian GNU/Linux 3.1, security support for Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 will cease at the end of March.

Extending Ubuntu's Battery Life

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: Last week when traveling to Europe for FOSDEM and other business meetings, I had picked up a new 9-cell battery for a Lenovo ThinkPad T60. While an additional three battery cells will noticeably extend your battery life, you can also extend your battery life by taking a few simple steps.

New add-ons for OpenOffice.org Writer

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: After a slow start, add-ons for OpenOffice.org are finally starting to reach a critical mass. When I last wrote about add-ons for OpenOffice.org in September 2004, the examples were relatively limited, with extendedPDF the outstanding example.

Open Source Gaming: Nexuiz 2.4 Released!

Filed under
Gaming

tipotheday.com: After a long wait, the latest edition of the fast-paced free and open source FPS, Nexuiz, has been released! Major updates include a new menu system, additional maps, more efficient use of memory, updated textures and graphics, and lots more.

Trafshow - Real Time Traffic Monitoring for the Paranoid

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: Of all the thousands of available or recommended applications out there that every geek (and non-geek) should have in their arsenal of tools, there are a few that slip under the radar and go relatively unnoticed in the tech world. One of those is trafshow. I've been using it for years, and it's one of the best network monitoring tools around.

OOXML Fails to Get Majority Approval at BRM

Filed under
OSS

groklaw: Basically, there were too many proposed changes to be able to cover them in the BRM, so they tried a workaround, but the upshot is ... it's a mess. Oddly, despite the rules, Alex Brown, Updegrove reports, allowed non P countries to vote, but OOXML still couldn't get a majority of the delegations to back it at the BRM.

Adding a UPS to a desktop Linux machine

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) will allow your computer to continue to function for a period of time when mains power is lost. This can help you to smooth over short-term (1-5 minute) loss of power by running from the UPS battery.

Why I prefer Vim and not Emacs

Filed under
Software

masuran.org: If there is one question you could ask to recognize a true geek, it would be “Do you use Vi or Emacs?” If you’re talking to a geek they will either start laughing because they recognize you as a fellow geek or they will start talking about the merits of their favorite editor.

Review: ThinkPad T61 with SLED 10 Linux

Filed under
SUSE

crn.com: Used to be that the only way to get a Linux laptop was to buy a laptop and install it yourself. Not anymore. Lenovo shipped a ThinkPad T61 pre-installed with SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 to CMP Channel Test Center for review.

Better Linux Sound Management With ALSA

Filed under
Software

LinuxPlanet: Today we're going to dig into ALSA, the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture, because I think it's the best tool for managing your Linux sound devices. It's good for managing multiple sound devices, and it works in all Linux environments including other window managers, or no X Windows at all.

Installing Wolvix Linux - Full tutorial

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

dedoimedo.com: We all know that Slackware means stability and security. But Slackware has never been a distribution for the weak and elderly. It has always been regarded as one of the more geeky and difficult distros, alongside Gentoo. Until now. Well, Gentoo got Sabayon and Slackware got Wolvix.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: DHS on Potential Voting Machines Cracking, Joomla Patches Critical Flaw

  • DHS tells 21 states they were Russia hacking targets before 2016 election
  • 1. WikiLeaks, Russian edition: how it’s being viewed
    Russia has been investing heavily in a vision of cyberdemocracy that will link the public directly with government officials to increase official responsiveness. But it is also enforcing some of the toughest cybersecurity laws to empower law enforcement access to communications and ban technologies that could be used to evade surveillance. Could WikiLeaks put a check on Russia’s cyber regime? This week, the online activist group released the first of a promised series of document dumps on the nature and workings of Russia’s surveillance state. So far, the data has offered no bombshells. “It’s mostly technical stuff. It doesn’t contain any state contracts, or even a single mention of the FSB [security service], but there is some data here that’s worth publishing,” says Andrei Soldatov, coauthor of “The Red Web,” a history of the Soviet and Russian internet. But, he adds, “Anything that gets people talking about Russia's capabilities and actions in this area should be seen as a positive development.”
  • Joomla patches eight-year-old critical CMS bug
    Joomla has patched a critical bug which could be used to steal account information and fully compromise website domains. This week, the content management system (CMS) provider issued a security advisory detailing the flaw, which is found in the LDAP authentication plugin. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is used by Joomla to access directories over TCP/IP. The plugin is integrated with the CMS. Joomla considers the bug a "medium" severity issue, but according to researchers from RIPS Technologies, the problem is closer to a critical status.
  • Joomla! 3.7.5 - Takeover in 20 Seconds with LDAP Injection
    With over 84 million downloads, Joomla! is one of the most popular content management systems in the World Wide Web. It powers about 3.3% of all websites’ content and articles. Our code analysis solution RIPS detected a previously unknown LDAP injection vulnerability in the login controller. This one vulnerability could allow remote attackers to leak the super user password with blind injection techniques and to fully take over any Joomla! <= 3.7.5 installation within seconds that uses LDAP for authentication. Joomla! has fixed the vulnerability in the latest version 3.8.

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.