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Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Low-power netbooks run Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: A Germany-based retailer called One is shipping four branded, Linux-based netbooks that consume only 3.5 Watts apiece. The One A440, A110, A115, and A140 are all based on the Via C7-M Ultra Low Voltage processor (ULV), and come with integrated Via graphics chips.

A New Acceleration Architecture For X

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: XAA, or the XFree86 Acceleration Architecture, is over twelve years old and finally in 2005 it was greeted by a replacement, EXA. EXA was designed to offer speed improvements over XAA by accelerating more options and enhancing X's RENDER extension.

Ulteo: What Gael Did Next

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: Almost immediately upon leaving Mandrakesoft, he began making teasing statements about his next project, claiming it would revolutionise the way we use computers. The Ulteo project, as it became known, was all about freeing us from our home desktops.

9 + 5 things you’ll get with Fedora 10

Filed under
Linux

fabrizioballiano.net: Fedora 10 will be released on 28th October 2008, let’s take a look at what some of the upcoming features, 9 of them have been accepted by the team, 5 more are still in the “proposed” state.

interesting Press Releases

Filed under
Linux
  • Freespire Returns to Debian Roots

  • VMware Joins The Linux Foundation
  • gOS Announces gOS 3 Gadgets -- the Newest Version of Its Linux OS

Mozilla reveals the Firefox of the future?

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcpro.co.uk: Mozilla has unveiled a spectacular new concept browser, dubbed Aurora. The bleeding-edge browser is part of a new Mozilla Labs initiative, in which the open-source foundation is encouraging people to contribute ideas and designs for the browser of the future.

Linux is a platform, not an OS

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: There is one thing that many people have yet failed to realize, and that is that Linux is a platform, not an OS. Now as bizarre as that may sound, if you truly think about it, you'll realize that I'm right.

Opendocument format

Filed under
OSS

trolltech.com/blogs: The Open Document Format (ODF) is an ISO standardized method of storing rich text and other office data. The ODF standard has grown in popularity over the last years quite a bit. Many governments around the world have passed laws stating that any sort of communication between the government and its people has to be done in ODF.

LinuxWorld 2008 - nobody cares

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: There are certain phrases that we tend to hear a lot from vendors — ‘enterprise-class, best of breed, customer choice,’ etc. However, I was repeatedly hearing somewhat surprising phrases as I made the rounds at LinuxWorld this year: ‘We don’t care, customers don’t care, no one cares …”

Of Kids and Linux

Filed under
Linux

penguinpetes.com: LinuxWorld is planning a good old-fashioned install-fest for their San Francisco conference. And if you have an old PC or can bluff your way through an Ubuntu install, you're invited to participate. Ah, the kids! God bless the younger generation. That is the hope for Free and Open Source Software.

The Pitfalls of Open Source Litigation

Filed under
OSS

internetnews.com: Optimists say the best things in life are free; realists say yes, but anything that's free costs way too much. Nowhere is that more applicable than in open source software.

Sony’s music now DRM free in Germany

Filed under
Misc

liquidat.wordpress: The entire process actually works with Konqueror (3.5.9 on Fedora 8), so there is no need for Microsoft software at all. If I saw it right there wasn’t even flash or anything else used. Just a plain page which, in the end, offered me the files inside a zip container.

Desktop search comparison: Beagle vs. Tracker

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Beagle and Tracker are projects that allow you to index your files so you can quickly search filesystems. Both projects started out with the intention of being used with the GNOME desktop, but have recently made a push to be desktop-independent and work with KDE and other desktop environments.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu - THE Linux Distribution

  • Mozilla Developer News for Aug 5
  • Could Linux Change Democracy?
  • Microsoft menaced by open source
  • GoblinX 2.7
  • IBM to open source supercomputing code
  • Would you buy a Microsoft-less desktop?
  • Interview: MarkMail Indexes KDE Mailinglist Archives
  • Book Review: Ubuntu for Non-Geeks
  • Kernel Log: New Stable kernel, DRI2 postponed, Xgl removed from X.org
  • Mozilla about:addons
  • Using Bash To Feed Command Output To A While Loop Without Using Pipes
  • Microsoft To Counter Open Source With 'Basic' Software Line

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • MLB.TV in Linux

  • Fedora on a stick
  • Learn more about a command when no man info page is available
  • Customize the Joe text editor
  • How to install OpenOffice.org extensions
  • A few terminal tips
  • Traffic Accounting with Linux IPTables
  • Hauppauge WinTV-HVR900 on Mandriva Linux 2008.1

Linux: the desktop years

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: IBM, Canonical, Red Hat and Novell have put out an interesting joint release about how they are to deliver Microsoft-free personal computing. In celebration of Linux’s imminent domination of the desktop market I thought it would be worth remembering how we got here:

Spotlight on FireFTP, an FTP client for Firefox

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: One of the things that makes Firefox so gosh-darn lovable is the ability to create and add third-party extensions to the browser. These can range from themes that customize the appearance, little boxes to update your Twitter, or even full-featured applications like music players or, say, FTP clients!

Linuxworld headlines

Filed under
Linux
  • LinuxWorld Conference & Expo Announces Finalists for Product Excellence Awards

  • LinuxWorld video: Merrill Lynch moves to stateless computing
  • LinuxWorld: For mobile operating systems, too much Linux?
  • LinuxWorld gets an open source voting tryout
  • LinuxWorld Day Two Gets Rolling
  • LinuxWorld keynotes: Now is the time to invest
  • LinuxWorld showing its true colors?

Ubuntu wins “Best Desktop Solution” at Linux World Expo 2008

Filed under
Ubuntu

fabianrodriguez.com: I just wanted to extended a huge “thank you!” to all of the Ubuntu community Smile Today Ubuntu won the “Best Desktop Solution” Product Excellence Award at LinuxWorld Conference and Expo 2008 in San Francisco, California for a second consecutive year.

New modules for GNOME 2.24

Filed under
Software

LWN: The GNOME release team has announced which new modules will be added for the 2.24 release. New stuff will include empathy, project hamster, and PolicyKit. The up-and-coming Conduit synchronization tool didn't quite make it, and neither did WebKit, though both seem likely for 2.26.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Code of Conduct, Kelly Davis, Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions

  • ow We’re Making Code of Conduct Enforcement Real — and Scaling it
    This is the first line of our Community Participation Guidelines — and an nudge to keep empathy at center when designing response processes. Who are you designing for? Who is impacted? What are their needs, expectations, dependencies, potential bias and limitations?
  • Role Models in AI: Kelly Davis
    Meet Kelly Davis, the Manager/Technical Lead of the machine learning group at Mozilla. His work at Mozilla includes developing an open speech recognition system with projects like Common Voice and Deep Speech (which you can help contribute to). Beyond his passion for physics and machine learning, read on to learn about how he envisions the future of AI, and advice he offers to young people looking to enter the field.
  • Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions
    While the world celebrates athletic excellence, we’re taking a moment to share some of the amazing Internet champions that help build, support and share Firefox.

Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

So has Canonical been breaking rules with Ubuntu is 2017, or has it in been writing its own rulebook? Back in April we saw an AWS-tuned kernel of Ubuntu launched, the move to cloud is unstoppable, clearly. We also saw Ubuntu version 17.04 released, with Unity 7 as the default desktop environment. This release included optimisations for environments with low powered graphics hardware. Read more Also: Ubuntu will let upgraders ‘opt-in’ to data collection in 18.04

The npm Bug

  • ​Show-stopping bug appears in npm Node.js package manager
    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
  • Botched npm Update Crashes Linux Systems, Forces Users to Reinstall
    A bug in npm (Node Package Manager), the most widely used JavaScript package manager, will change ownership of crucial Linux system folders, such as /etc, /usr, /boot. Changing ownership of these files either crashes the system, various local apps, or prevents the system from booting, according to reports from users who installed npm v5.7.0. —the buggy npm update.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more