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Saturday, 30 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Build It Yourself: A Linux Network Appliance

Filed under
Misc

Practically Networked invites to join our new series on how to build your own Linux-based network appliance. If you're a small business owner with a shared Internet connection and some networked PCs, this is just what you need to secure your LAN with a powerful, flexible device that outperforms comparable commercial devices for a fraction of the cost, or even no cost at all.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: Fuel Injection for HP-UX

Filed under
OS

IBM will tripling the middleware offerings (including WebSphere, Rational, Tivoli, and Lotus) available for HP-UX so that they span the systems vendor's entire portfolio. In other news Linux servers grew 17 percent and now account for 12.2 percent of all server revenue. Linux is found to be much faster than Apple's OS X for statistical computing.

GL to the power of X

It's always fun when the future sneaks up on you, and in the last few months that's exactly what's happened in the land of X. Hackers at Novell crawled into a deep, dark basement and spent months hacking away in secret before emerging in January, eyes blinking from the light, with a still experimental but surprisingly usable OpenGL-based X server called Xgl.

Starting Processes in Fedora, SuSe, Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

At some point we all need to get into our Linux system, and ensure that key processes are started correctly at boot-up. This very brief guide will show you how to find and start your system processes also called services by using the cron process as an example.

Henry's Tech Advice #3 - Python Functions

My name is Henry the Adequate, and I am a superhero. Felinn asks “In python, how do you call functions? Also, is there an ni function?

More Adventures in Kernel Security

Filed under
Linux

As promised, I took my own advice and started playing around with some of the improved kernel modules that I wrote about in a previous article. My kernel module of choice for this exercise was grsecurity. After searching around for a Linux distribution that was built on the most recent kernel, I settled on the latest Rubix distribution.

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo
Slack
SUSE
Ubuntu

The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools. Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

SA open source game developers' quest for glory

Filed under
OSS

A group of South African game developers will meet in Johannesburg tomorrow to hammer out plans for the development of an open source adventure role-playing game that they hope will reinvigorate South Africa's game development industry.

Should Oracle fear open source?

Filed under
Misc

Oracle continues to dominate the database software market but challenges lie ahead from open source, analysts say. The biggest threat to Oracle's dominance of the market could be open source competitors such as MySQL, analysts said.

PIcasa on Linux, so far

Filed under
Software

What the hell, scoops are over-rated anyway. News is news. In this case, news that Google has released Picasa, its photo editing and organizing software, on Linux. That's before they release it on Apple (if they ever do). I believe this is a first.

MySQL Seen as a Buyout Target

Filed under
OSS

As the world of software consolidates and open-source programs become more popular, some observers think MySQL is the company most likely to be acquired by a software giant.

Report: Open Source a Judgment Standard

Filed under
OSS

Open Source is changing the way that Gartner Group measures the application development market. The big loser as a result may well be proprietary Java application development tools.

NDISwrapper Setup Information for SUSE 10.x

Filed under
HowTos

First off, what is NDISwrapper? Shockingly enough, it's a wrapper for the NDIS layer of Windows. In plain English, it means you can use Windows XP drivers inside Linux to power your WIFI card. Very cool.

Yes, Virginia, there will be a Flash Player 9 for Linux

Filed under
Software

Yes, Adobe is actively working on the Linux version of Flash Player 9. We expect to make a pre-release version available on Adobe Labs for early feedback and testing before the end of the year, with the full release expected in early 2007*.

Full Blurb.

Release Candidate for Ubuntu 6.06 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu team is proud to announce the Release Candidate for version 6.06 LTS of Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Edubuntu - codenamed "Dapper Drake". We consider this release candidate complete, stable and suitable for testing by any user.

Easing migration with the OpenOffice.org menu and toolbar configuration tools

Filed under
HowTos

One of my blog readers reports that, when he migrated his organization to OpenOffice.org, he didn't even tell the users that they were switching to a different office suite. He just said that there was going to be a big upgrade. Then, he and his migration cohorts modified the OpenOffice.org menus and toolbars to resemble the Microsoft Office layout and phrasing as much as possible (without violating copyright, of course) and gave that configured version to the users. He reports very few problems with the migration.

45 Minutes to a Moodle Education Server

Filed under
HowTos

This beginner article provides step-by-step instructions for installing Moodle, a Learning Management System, on to a Fedora Linux server. It provides the steps necessary to setup a full powered intranet web-server that can support course listings, event calendars, student/teacher communication and much more. Best of all, a prototype server can be functional within about 45 minutes.

Create your own distribution torrents

Filed under
HowTos

The BitTorrent protocol has revolutionized peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing. It works by enabling users to download fragments of a large file from other users simultaneously, rather than waiting for one file to complete, thus speeding the download process. As a result, many popular Linux distributions have started releasing their ISOs through torrents, many of which you can find at LinuxTracker. But if your favourite distro doesn't offer a release torrent, why not make your own?

Setting Up a Server

Filed under
HowTos

This article teaches you, the reader, how to configure a GNU/Linux based server with three of the most important services that must be provided in a company, at home, a lab or anywhere else, both for clients and internal usage: web, database, mail.

Book review: Linux Patch Management by Michael Jang

Filed under
Reviews

In “Linux Patch Management�, Michael Jang describes in necessary detail how to achieve patch efficiency via tools such as apt-get, rpm and rsynch. His strength and skill at structuring the most relevant information can be seen throughout the book.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu-based Smartphones And Tablets Sound Good, On Paper, But...Do They Make Any Sense?
    As I previously stated in a recent article, I'm a huge fan of Ubuntu as a desktop operating system. It's friendly, reliable, consumes little resources and is largely virus-free.
  • Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ expected to be based on Ubuntu 16.04
    Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ coming soon, to be based on Ubuntu 16.04 and have plenty of new features
  • BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet - The heat is on
    Some investments are financial. Some are emotional. When it comes to Linux on tablets, my motives are mostly of the latter kind. I was super-excited to learn BQ was launching a tablet with Ubuntu, something that I have been waiting for a good solid three years now. We had the phone released last spring, and now there's a tablet. The cycle is almost complete. Now, as you know, I was only mildly pleased with the Ubuntu phone. It is a very neat product, but it is not yet as good as the competitors, across all shades of the usability spectrum. But this tablet promises a lot. Full HD, desktop-touch continuum, seamless usage model, and more. Let us have a look.
  • Kubuntu-16.04 — a review
    The kubuntu implementation of Plasma 5 seems to work quite well. It’s close to what I am seeing in other implementations. It includes the Libre Office software, rather than the KDE office suite. But most users will prefer that anyway. I’m not a big fan of the default menu. But the menu can easily be switched to one of the alternative forms. I’ve already done that, and am preferring the “launcher based on cascading popup menus”. If you are trying kubuntu, I suggest you experiment with the alternative formats to see which you prefer.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review: Very Stable & Improved, Buggy Software Center, Though
    In almost all the occasions that I tested Ubuntu LTS releases, quite rightly so, they’ve always worked better than the non-LTS releases. And this Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the 6th of such release is no exception. This one actually is even more impressive than the others because it has addressed some security related issues and even although not critical, subtle issues that I mentioned in the review. As far as the performance was concerned, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was only largely outperformed by the memory usage where there is a large increase in memory usage. Other than that, those numbers look pretty good to me. That ‘.deb’ file issues with the Software Center is the only major concern that I can come up with. But I’m sure it’ll be fixed very soon.

Devuan Beta, Stumbling Tumbleweed, Ubuntu Too

Today in Linux news Debian-fork Devuan is forging ahead with its plans to create a distribution offering init freedom by releasing a beta for testers. Douglas DeMaio posted today that openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have halted due to glibc upgrade rebuilds. Dedoimedo reviewed the BQ Aquaris M10 and liliputing.com posted of another Ubuntu laptop for sale. And finally, the Hectic Geek reviewed Ubuntu 16.04 and Neil Rickert reviewed Kubuntu 16.04. Read more Also: Devuan releases beta Devuan Jessie - beta release announcement

Devuan Jessie beta released

dear Init Freedom Lovers, once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you. As promised two years ago with the first declaration of Exodus from Debian, today we can proudly state: we do not go gentle into that good night. Now has come the time to announce the Beta release of Devuan. Debian GNU+Linux is a fork of Debian without systemd, on its way to become much more than that. This Beta release marks an important milestone towards the sustainability and the continuation of Devuan as an universal base distribution. Read more Also: Beta Released Of Devuan, The Systemd-Free Version Of Debian

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