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About Tux Machines

Friday, 26 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story What is the sense of gNewSense? srlinuxx 31/05/2011 - 4:05pm
Story Fedora 15 KDE: When New Old Is Better Than New New. srlinuxx 31/05/2011 - 4:02pm
Story Canonical rubbishes Android tablets srlinuxx 31/05/2011 - 3:50pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 31/05/2011 - 6:38am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 31/05/2011 - 6:29am
Story New opensource linux space sim srlinuxx 30/05/2011 - 8:58pm
Story Linaro Rapidly Hitting Linux Milestones srlinuxx 30/05/2011 - 8:54pm
Story GNOME 3! My experiences so far... srlinuxx 30/05/2011 - 8:52pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 407 srlinuxx 30/05/2011 - 6:56pm
Story How Unity, Compiz, GNOME Shell & KWin Affect Performance srlinuxx 30/05/2011 - 6:55pm

How to create easy-access templates via right-click : Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

How many of us regularly use certain types of files or documents during our day-to-day work? I know I am always in & out of documents and editing or creating .html files. Well, this tuturial will shave off precious seconds as you scramble for world domination.

Support and Typical Problems in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

This chapter from The Official Ubuntu Book discusses some of the most common problems faced by users, presented in a cookbook format, followed by a concise solution.

First look at Ubuntu Fesity Fawn Herd 1

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

I recently got Feisty Fawn Herd 1 (the first testing release) up and running in a Virtual Machine to take a look. While this is a testing distro does contain bugs, it’s interesting to look at what’s coming down the line for April of ‘07.

Networking Notes: Learn to Stop Worrying and Love Linux

Filed under
Linux

If you've been thinking of dipping your toes in the Linux pool, you might find a lot of the sound and fury surrounding licenses, technologies and strange dealings with Microsoft more than you bargained for when you signed up for a low-cost and powerful file server. Come on in ... the water's fine.

Coolest places you will find LINUX directing operations

Filed under
Linux

This list of interesting Linux uses is by no means exhaustive. I just picked linux uses that interested me and I hope you will find it interesting too. Most of the picks came from Linuxdevices.com. You can check it out and see their cool stuff.

Mozilla Firefox 3 - Gran Paradiso (Alpha1) now available

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla has released Mozilla Firefox Gran Paradiso Alpha 1, which is an early developer milestone for the next major version of Firefox that is being built on top of the next generation of Mozilla’s layout engine, Gecko 1.9.

Assessing the true cost of One Laptop Per Child

Filed under
Misc

While Nicholas Negroponte's One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project has garnered a tremendous amount of support worldwide, it has also become a lightning rod for critics who have questioned the viability of its long-term success and impact. As the OLPC receives its first shipment of laptops and continues to formalize agreements with developing countries, the cost of individual laptops hover at about $130. Critics, however, suggest that the "true cost" may be several times that amount.

Disk Partitioning

Filed under
HowTos

Nowadays P2P like bittorrent are so popular, until others need to add a new harddisk to download all the stuff. A new harddisk is need to repartition before you can use it. To partitioning the new harddisk, you can use this:

Introduction to Freedom

Filed under
OSS

Since this is on the internet and the objective of this article is to let you - the users of the internet - know and hopefully have a better idea about freedom on the internet, in computers and on media, we would like to explain some of the ideas that have the principle of freedom at its core which are important for these fields.

Batch processing in PHP

Filed under
News

What do you do when you have a feature in your Web application that takes longer than a second or two to finish? You need some type of offline processing solution. Check out several methods for offline servicing of long-running jobs in your PHP application.

ZenWalk 4.0: Great Taste, Less Volkerding

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I do not like Slackware. Let me get that out right now. This should be obvious to anyone who's read my rants or had the misfortune to mistake my Slackware 11 rant for a real review and decided to subsequently question my IQ and parentage on the comments section of OSNews. Zenwalk is a derivative of Slackware, so it's starting out the game with two strikes against it. However it has been several versions since I last looked at this distro (2.4). Let's see if it can make up for its parent.

Open source booming in Asia

Filed under
OSS

Open source code is now used by over 70 per cent of software developers in Asia, according to a new report. The number of developers using open source in the region has surged more than 40 per cent in just three years.

Open Source to pervade enterprise users

Filed under
OSS

Open source seems to be the buzzword that is set to pervade enterprises over the next few years. According to industry sources, enterprise open source buyers will turn into systems integrators, as the architectural approaches to open source will be predominant.

Open Source at 90 MPH

Filed under
Misc

Inspired by Linux, the OScar project aims to build a car by tapping the knowledge of a volunteer team. It won’t be an easy ride, but their journey is important

Travails of adding a second hard disk in a PC running Linux

Filed under
Hardware

Over the years, I have accumulated a couple of hard disks which I salvaged from my old computers. I have a Seagate 12 GB hard disk, a Samsung 2.1 GB hard disk apart from another Seagate 20 GB hard disk. In fact, these were just lying around with out being put to any use and recently I decided to add one of them to my present computer.

Interview with Fred Trotter: the Medsphere saga

Filed under
Interviews

Recently Medsphere, supposedly an “Open Source” Medical Software Company, has sued its founders Scott and Steve Shreeve. Why? Medsphere claims that the Shreeves illegally released Medsphere software to Sourceforge. An “Open Source” Software company is suing its founders for releasing code under a free license... that’s a bit like Ford suing its employees for making cars.

OS X more appealing than desktop Linux: Gartner

Filed under
OS

OS X is more appealing to enterprises as a desktop operating system than ever before and although it is unlikely to take market share away from Windows, the Mac could reduce the number of Linux-based desktops, according to research group Gartner.

Video: openSUSE 10.2 Installation

Filed under
SUSE

After trying out openSUSE 10.2 last night @home on a separate partition and spending some time, around couple of hours, I decided to take a bold decision - to install it as my primary OS, replacing the good old SUSE 10.1.

GNU/Linux: anywhere and everywhere

Filed under
Linux

There are many things about GNU/Linux which merit complaint. But it is extremely doubtful whether anyone can find anything to complain about with regards to the versatile nature of the operating system. Despite this flexibility, it's not often that one hears of the operating system being used in secure facilities by government organisations. Hence I was pleasantly surprised to hear that a locked-down version of the Knoppix distribution is being used at a remand centre close to Melbourne.

The Linux Liability Problem

Filed under
Linux

The greatest differentiator between OS vendors is no longer a question of features, function, performance, customer support, security, reliability or any feature of the product itself. The future of computing may depend on the lawyers.

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More in Tux Machines

Servers/Networks

  • Rackspace to be Acquired for $4.3B
    Rackspace announced that it is being acquired in an all-cash deal valued at $4.3B. Pending regulatory anti-trust approval, the firm will be taken private by a group of investors led by Apollo Global Management in Q4 of 2016. This valuation equates to a price of $32/share. The 38% premium cited in the announcement is calculated against a base share price from August 3, as the news about the pending acquisition began increasing the company stock price as early as August 4. For historical context, this valuation falls considerably below the company’s peak market capitalization in January 2013 when Rackspace was worth $10.9B. This means that the company’s current valuation – including the premium – is less than 40% of what it was at its highest point.
  • More on Open Source Tools for Data Science
    Open source tools are having a transformative impact on the world of data science. In a recent guest post here on OStatic, Databricks' Kavitha Mariappan (shown here), who is Vice President of Marketing, discussed some of the most powerful open source solutions for use in the data science arena. Databricks was founded by the creators of the popular open source Big Data processing engine Apache Spark, which is itself transforming data science. Here are some other open source tools in this arena to know about. As Mariappan wrote: "Apache Spark, a project of the Apache Software Foundation, is an open source platform for distributed in-memory data processing. Spark supports complete data science pipelines with libraries that run on the Spark engine, including Spark SQL, Spark Streaming, Spark MLlib and GraphX. Spark SQL supports operations with structured data, such as queries, filters, joins, and selects. In Spark 2.0, released in July 2016, Spark SQL comprehensively supports the SQL 2003 standard, so users with experience working with SQL on relational databases can learn how to work with Spark quickly."
  • SDN, open source nexus to accelerate service creation
    What's new in the SDN blog world? One expert says SDN advancements will be accelerated, thanks to SDN and open source convergence, while another points out the influence SDN has in the cloud industry.
  • Platform9 & ZeroStack Make OpenStack a Little More VMware-Friendly
    Platform9 and ZeroStack are adding VMware high availability to their prefab cloud offerings, part of the ongoing effort to make OpenStack better accepted by enterprises. OpenStack is a platform, an archipelago of open source projects that help you run a cloud. But some assembly is required. Both Platform9 and ZeroStack are operating on the theory that OpenStack will better succeed if it’s turned into more of a shrink-wrapped product.
  • Putting Ops Back in DevOps
    What Agile means to your typical operations staff member is, “More junk coming faster that I will get blamed for when it breaks.” There always is tension between development and operations when something goes south. Developers are sure the code worked on their machine; therefore, if it does not work in some other environment, operations must have changed something that made it break. Operations sees the same code perform differently on the same machine with the same config, which means if something broke, the most recent change must have caused it … i.e. the code did it. The finger-pointing squabbles are epic (no pun intended). So how do we get Ops folks interested in DevOps without promising them only a quantum order of magnitude more problems—and delivered faster?
  • Cloud chronicles
    How open-source software and cloud computing have set up the IT industry for a once-in-a-generation battle

KDE and Qt

GNOME News

  • Fresh From the Oven: GNOME Pie 0.6.9 Released
    For a slice of something this weekend you might want to check out the latest update to GNOME Pie, the circular app launcher for Linux desktops.
  • GUADEC 2016 and the Butterfly Effect
  • GUADEC 2016 Notes
    I’m back from GUADEC and wanted to share a few thoughts on the conference itself and the post-conference hackfest days. All the talks including the opening and closing sessions and the GNOME Foundation AGM are available online. Big thanks goes to the organization team for making this possible.

Security News

  • Thursday's security updates
  • Priorities in security
  • How Core Infrastructure Initiative Aims to Secure the Internet
    In the aftermath of the Heartbleed vulnerability's emergence in 2014, the Linux Foundation created the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII)to help prevent that type of issue from recurring. Two years later, the Linux Foundation has tasked its newly minted CTO, Nicko van Someren, to help lead the effort and push it forward. CII has multiple efforts under way already to help improve open-source security. Those efforts include directly funding developers to work on security, a badging program that promotes security practices and an audit of code to help identify vulnerable code bases that might need help. In a video interview with eWEEKat the LinuxCon conference here, Van Someren detailed why he joined the Linux Foundation and what he hopes to achieve.
  • Certificate Authority Gave Out Certs For GitHub To Someone Who Just Had A GitHub Account
    For many years now, we've talked about the many different problems today's web security system has based on the model of security certificates issued by Certificate Authorities. All you need is a bad Certificate Authority be trusted and a lot of bad stuff can happen. And it appears we've got yet another example. A message on Mozilla's security policy mailing list notes that a free certificate authority named WoSign appeared to be doing some pretty bad stuff, including handing out certificates for a base domain if someone merely had control over a subdomain. This was discovered by accident, but then tested on GitHub... and it worked.