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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Virtual Machine Replication & Failover with VMWare Server & Debian Etch (4.0)

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HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions about how to create a highly available VMware Server environment on a Debian Etch system. With this tutorial, you will be able to create Virtual Machines that will be available on multiple systems with failover/failback capabilities.

3 months with Vector Linux 5.8 SOHO

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Linux

jjsh.org: I have been evaluating Vector Linux 5.8 SOHO over the last 3 months or so. As promised, here are my findings.

Setting the time of your system

Filed under
HowTos

go2linux.org: Lots of the task your Linux machine are controlled by the time, things like cron jobs, emails' Date, file's dates, so it is really important to have your computer's clock on time.

Linux For Older PC Hardware

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Linux

At Phoronix we are constantly running Linux benchmarks. With an increasing number of new Linux users trying out Linux for the first time on their old computers, we have been asked to conduct some benchmarks using popular desktop Linux distributions on older hardware.

I would like to introduce you to Microsoft's latest Vista Victim

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Microsoft

helios: Like most people, Ed is a computer user...a novice computer user. He has a set number of tasks he assigns to his computer and rarely if ever deviates from them. That's not because he wants to, but like most computer users, it's all he knows how to do.

The 'WOW' Signal turns 30

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Sci/Tech

cosmiclog: 30 years ago astronomer Jerry Ehman was looking over a printout of radio data from Ohio State University's Big Ear Radio Observatory when he saw a string of code so remarkable that he had to circle it and scribble "Wow!" in the margin. The printout recorded an anomalous signal so strong that it had to come from an extraordinary source.

Howto Setup Bluetooth Keyboard and Mouse in Ubuntu

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HowTos

ubuntu geek: If you have a Bluetooth Keyboard and Mouse here is the procedure to follow howto setup in ubuntu.

Thinking outside the Opera box

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Interviews

the register: Some of Opera's long-term bets are beginning to pay off. This week we caught up with Opera founder and CEO Jon von Tetzchner to discuss this, and some of the thornier challenges facing the company. So we started with a biggie - was the web leaving Opera behind?

Guitar Hero... more addictive than WoW?

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Gaming

Vincent Danen: Last week I bought Guitar Hero II with the guitar controller. I brought it home and really got into it. Had to move the PS2 out of my office or I'd get no work done.

Grandmom’s guide to Linux/Ubuntu: Downloads and add ons and Wine, oh my!

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Ubuntu

bloggernews.net: One good thing about Ubuntu is that it’s webbrowser is Firefox (Opera is also available). There are a lot of these extensions available, but I’ll just list the few I use every day. Look around and see what you like and try them. Most (but not all) work on the Linux version of Firefox.

Thirteen Blog Clichés

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Misc

coding horror: I started out in early 2004. As a result, I've developed some rather strong opinions about what makes blogs work so well, and what makes blogs sometimes not work so well. I'd like to share some of the latter with you today, in a piece I call Thirteen Blog Clichés.

OSI email group gets catty over Microsoft's Permissive License request

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: The OSI License-Discuss mailing list has been ablaze for the past few days since Microsoft submitted its Permissive License (MS-PL) to the OSI [Open Source Initiative] for official open source license approval. Chuck Swiger, an active member of the license-discuss community, thinks that lets the GPL out of the mix.

Troubleshooting Linux Audio, Part 3a

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HowTos

Linux Journal: At last we reach the final installment of this series, the question & answer stage in which we'll consider some of the common problems encountered with audio and MIDI on Linux, along with some common and perhaps not-so-common solutions to those problems. We've looked at some indispensable items for your Linux system troubleshooting toolkit, now let's see how they are applied.

I Run Linux, and I Don't Hate Microsoft

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Microsoft

Penguin Pete: Yes, you read the title correctly. I only run FOSS systems, including GNU/Linux, BSD, Open Solaris, Minix, GNU/HURD, and Plan Nine From Bell Labs. I'll even give a favorable nod to Apple hardware if I see it running FOSS software. But I am adamantly opposed to running a single byte of Microsoft code under my roof or associated with my business. Yet, I don't hate them.

What IBM learned from Linux, open source

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OSS

Matt Asay: IBM trumpets open standards so much that it's easy to forget the company cares deeply about open source, too. I much prefer this latter emphasis, incidentally, because IBM is so good at playing the "open" standards game - it's much harder to game an open-source license.

Gnome Main Menue Applet Preview

Filed under
Software

The Linux Movement: In my last post I made a quick little video of some of the New applets being developed for Awn. But there was one I couldn't get to work at the time, and that was the Awn Gnome Main Menu Applet. But Guess what i got it workign now....

PC Manufacturers Finally Embracing Linux, Sort Of

Filed under
Linux

dailytech: Dell and Lenovo are the first two companies to recently offer pre-installed open source Linux distribution on PCs and notebooks, but I highly doubt they will be the last manufacturers to take the plunge...

Ubuntu sources.list online generator

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Ubuntu

All about Linux: I have faced a number of times the prospect of entering the web address of the online repositories just because I some how tampered the contents of the sources.list file which is residing in /etc/apt/ location.

Lesser Known Applications for Linux — Learning and Hobby Tools

Filed under
Software

richardfcrawley.wordpress: This installment will review applications that serve as learning and hobby tools. It will range from beneath the surface of the Earth to orbiting the Earth.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation
    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.
  • Open Source for Science + Innovation
    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.
  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners
    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.

Docker/Kubernetes/Containers

  • Containerization Leaders Explore Possible Standardized Data Storage Interface
    A group of engineers from every leading container orchestrator maker have gathered together, virtually, around an initiative to explore a common lexicon for container-based data storage. Initially proposed by Mesosphere’s Benjamin Hindman, the Container Storage Interface initiative — which, for now, is essentially a GitHub document — is exploring the issue of whether the community at large, and their users, would benefit from a standardized API for addressing and managing storage volumes.
  • What are the top open source tools for Docker management?
  • Enterprise container DevOps steps up its game with Kubernetes 1.6
    Managing containers isn't easy. That's where such programs as Docker swarm mode, Kubernetes, and Mesosphere can make or break your containers initiatives. Perhaps the most popular of these, Kubernetes, has a new release, Kubernetes 1.6, that expands its reach by 50 percent to 5,000 node clusters. Conservatively, that means Kubernetes can manage 25,000 Docker containers at once.

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.