Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story With Open-Source Software, You Don't Have to Start From Scratch Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2014 - 6:24pm
Story FreeBSD 10.1 Has The New VT Driver, Hardware Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2014 - 5:34pm
Story Android tablet records and recreates 3D scenes Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2014 - 5:27pm
Story REVIEW: How to turn a Raspberry Pi in to an NSA-proof computer Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2014 - 5:26pm
Story Android L Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2014 - 5:25pm
Story AMD's RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver Sees Some Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2014 - 5:20pm
Story Native Netflix, Ts'o on Systemd, and Fedora 21 Alpha a Go Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2014 - 4:37am
Story Ubuntu gets closer to debut in Meizu MX4 phone Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2014 - 2:52am
Story Android L Will Keep Your Secrets Safer Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2014 - 2:45am
Story WHAT THE GNOME RELEASE TEAM IS DOING Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2014 - 2:32am

Kaffeine 0.8.6 Review

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: When it comes to video players, Kaffeine is my favourite, several reasons for it being that it plays anything I feed it with, it has good subtitle support and the interface it provides is clean and simple to use.

gOS and Sylvania's g netbook series

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

thinkgos.com/blog: Today we’re announcing on our blog that we’ve launched a new 7” netbook with Sylvania, one of the most trusted consumer brands in the world…

Opera 9.51 Released

opera.com: We released 9.51 today, which addresses a few security and lots of stability issues. This release is a recommended upgrade for all those running the latest stable releases.

Virtual Hosting With Proftpd And MySQL (Incl. Quota) On Ubuntu 8.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Proftpd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota with this setup.

yesterday's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • openSUSE Community Freetype2 packages with subpixel hinting available

  • Banshee 1.0 is more than an audio player (video)
  • Kernel Walkthrough
  • Will the Real Hans Reiser Lawyer Please Stand Up?
  • Garmin Nav devices run Gnome Linux
  • Michael Robertson, Where's the Cash?
  • The Four Levels of Small Notebooks
  • ISO approves PDF as an international standard
  • Microsoft "endorses" Linux?

yesterday's leftover howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Gnome Do : Attractive and Functional launcher for Gnome

  • Securing your Contents
  • Count Lines of Code with Cloc
  • Highlight Grepped Text
  • Tweaking the Eee PC
  • Get the changelog of a package with rpm
  • How to install Ms OFFICE 2003 in Ubuntu
  • Howto install and configure gDesklets in Ubuntu hardy
  • Choosing a Secure password

Happiness is a Hot Distro

Filed under
Linux

scienceblogs.com: Why is a Linux Distro, and the process of picking one and installing it, a matter of happiness? Well, for one thing, a Distro is a statement, almost a fashion statement. Picking a Distro is like needing a pickup truck deciding to go for some kind of Toyota pickup vs. a Ford vs. a GMC.

Ultrathin Linux PC Envy

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.computerworld: I want; I mean I really want, an Apple MacBook Air. If you're a Mac or Windows user you've got several excellent top-of-the-line ultra-thin laptop choices. If you're a desktop Linux user, your choices aren't that great. So far.

Invitrogen buys into Novell's SUSE Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Matt Asay: Invitrogen is a billion-dollar supplier to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, with 4,700 employees worldwide and a history of supplying many of the world's leading laboratories in groundbreaking research like the discovery of the AIDS virus.

Open Season Episode 19

Filed under
OSS

theregister.co.uk: We joined the Gates trolls during Episode 19 of Open Season. In this show, we honored Gates's exit from Microsoft with a little game called "Kermit the Frog or Bill." The game revolves around audio clips from both characters. All you have to figure out is who's talking.

Pardus 2008

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: After my review of do-it-yourself-Arch, I wanted to test a distro with a totally different philosophy, one that aims to give you a complete desktop system from the start. Pardus is a relatively new kid on the block, but it has been gathering positive reviews. These are my impressions.

Goodbye XP, and Linux

Filed under
Linux

aardvark.co.nz: Microsoft have, as of today, withdrawn sales of Windows XP through retailers and major PC manufacturers. But this raises a question for which I have no answer.. Where the hell is Linux? Where was the "Upgrade to Linux" campaign?

Flash Player 10 Beta Adds Linux Features

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Today, Adobe has pushed out a new beta for Adobe Flash Player 10, adding support for the Flash windowless mode "wmode", Video 4 Linux 2 (V4L2) support for web cameras with Flash, new language support, improved speed, and improved stability.

Sourceforge.net 2008 Community Choice Awards Finalists Posted

Filed under
OSS

sourceforge.net: After much tallying, number crunching, and crossing out bogus nominations, we are proud to announce the finalists of the 2008 SourceForge.net Community Choice Awards.

Guinness awards download record to Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

zdnet.com.au: The de facto registrar of superlative achievements has credited Mozilla for officially setting a record for downloads in a 24-hour period: 8,002,530 copies of Firefox.

Speaking UNIX: Just a few clicks

Filed under
News

The IBM AIX operating system has kept to what's important: stability, functionality, robustness. And it has done it by keeping a strong command-line interface (CLI). If you never learned to use the CLI or need a refresher on its basics, read on.

Defending Openness in the European Union

Filed under
OSS

Glyn Moody: One of the most surprising recent developments in the field of openness has been the rise of Europe as a key player there. This is not the result of some grand plan, despite what the conspiracy theorists in proprietary software companies might think, but simply a natural evolution.

Also: Open source community pushes Canberra on school computer fund

Free as in Kittens

Filed under
OSS

sharplinux.blogspot: I've talked so far about software freedom as in speech and as in beer. Today my topic is the kind of "free" that people view as a burden, the example being "free kittens." This is the meaning of "free" that keeps many regular, reasonable computer users from adopting.

Linux in Flight: The Penguin Grows Wings

Filed under
Misc

raiden.net: Being an avid fan of aircraft and flight (ref: extreme high performance flying), one of the things that has always caught my interest was the ever improving design of aircraft, engines and avionics. Linux has become quite the integral part of the aviation industry these days, so much so that in some respects, Tux has grown wings.

Asus Eee All-In-One Monitor

Filed under
Hardware

blog.laptopmag: If Eee mania hasn’t set in yet, it’s about to. Earlier this week pictures of the Eee PC 903, 904, and 905 were leaked. Joining these “unofficial” pictures of new Eee PCs are some shots of the Eee Monitor. Based on the photos, we’re wondering whether this is actually a monitor or a new all-in-one PC or a rip off of the iMac.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.