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Friday, 02 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Linux and Solaris face off

Filed under
Linux

Earlier this year, we asked our readers why people thinking of Linux aren't also thinking of OpenSolaris (or vice versa), now that both are pukka OSS operating systems.

Ubuntu fanboys on Linux Today arise for wireless input rant

Filed under
Ubuntu

My last article on the experiences of moving from Windows to Kubuntu Linux brought out the best and the worst of the Linux community judging by some of the responses it received.

Shape your traffic with trickle

Filed under
HowTos

Trickle is a lightweight userspace bandwidth shaper for users with low-speed Internet connections that lets you limit the bandwidth that a specific protocol is using so that you can maintain multiple simultaneous connections and not end up in a traffic jam.

Accelerating commands with alias

Filed under
HowTos

For all you command line conquerors out there that use the bash shell and are tired of continuously typing long commands again and again there is a built in shortcut. That is the alias command.

How To Install Internet Explorer On Ubuntu (Feisty Fawn, Edgy Eft And Dapper Drake)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide shows how to install three different Internet Explorer versions (6.0, 5.5, and 5.0) on Ubuntu Feisty Fawn, Edgy Eft and Dapper Drake desktops. This is good for people such as web designers who have switched to Linux but still need to test their web sites in Internet Explorer.

Celestia Brings Space Exploration To Your Desktop

Filed under
Software

Celestia is a free software package that graphically simulates celestial objects ranging from the earth and our solar system to distant constellations and galaxies.

Simulating motions, light and shadow in three dimensions, the program generates amazing 3D images and allows the user to travel to any place in the universe and visit planets, comets, and other objects in the solar system.

Linux Scheduling for Absolute Beginners

Filed under
HowTos

In my first article, I provided some basic understanding of how scheduling on Linux operating system works and also gave some examples of how to schedule jobs using cron at different date and times. If you haven’t read it, please read Scheduling for Absolute Beginner first.

Two approaches to Flash

Filed under
Interviews

The free software community has two independent projects working toward the implementation of a free Flash player: Gnash and swfdec. There has been some talk recently about these two projects, their goals, their accomplishments, and whether it makes sense to have them both. In an effort to bring more light to the situation, LWN held a conversation with the principal developers of both projects.

Red Hat fattens pork pie

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat has sealed a potentially lucrative marketing and technology deal that could see its open source and Linux software land in more government and defense locations.

The company is partnering with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) to development of technology and marketing to promote Red Hat and open source code to defense, federal and commercial users.

Executing commands upon remote machines via secure email

Filed under
HowTos

I recently came across the grunt package which is designed to allow you to execute commands remotely, via the delivery of GPG-signed email. Since documentation is scant this introductory article was born.

Once installed there are three commands that can be used:

gruntsend

GNU Screen - the ASCII window manager

Filed under
Software

GNU Screen or screen in short is something I discovered late in my UNIX romance. Now that I have got hooked to it there is no going back. One of the first packages I install on any linux distro is this marvelous creation. Let us take a dekko at this and see what makes it so versatile.

The Open Source Desktop: Boom Or Bust?

Filed under
Linux

Ironically for Microsoft, Vista is just the shot in the arm that desktop systems with open-source operating systems needed to boost their sales. At least that's what solution providers seem to think.

Google announces Summer of Code projects

Filed under
Google
OSS

The suspense is over for Google Summer of Code (SoC) 2007 hopefuls. The list is out and Google has accepted 900 applications from a pool of about 6,200.

Penguins form queue to peck INQ hack to bits

Filed under
PCLOS

I NOW HAVE NEARLY one hundred 100 flame-mails about PCLinuxOS, most of them questioning my parentage, one or two of them trying to explain what happened, most of the writers sort of hinting they are part of the distro team.

A week with Windows

Filed under
Linux

As a GNU/Linux user and developer I rarely get to see how the other half lives. That is, Windows users. So, during my week off work, I had two goals: complete the recording of a music project I’d been working on, and finish as many outstanding (non-Linux-centric) projects as possible... using only Windows.

NdisWrapper: The Ultimate Guide

Filed under
HowTos

Here's a comprehensive and idiot-proof guide for utilizing NdisWrapper extracted from Beginning Ubuntu Linux, Second Edition. The guide is part of Chapter 8, which provides a full guide to hardware configuration under Ubuntu.

Is VMware Player Faster than VMware Server?

Filed under
Software

I've been a VMware Player user since it was first released, but I recently decided to switch to VMware Server when I found out that it supports dual processors and snapshots. To my dismay I frequently experienced mouse lag, slow graphics, and keyboard sticking. Switching back to VMware Player resolved my issues and was noticeably faster.

LinuxFest Northwest 2007 looms

Filed under
Linux

Mark Ashworth, one of the original founders of Linuxfest Northwest, said the conference got its start in 1998 when a small group of people invited a couple of local Unix gurus to discuss forming what became the Bellingham Linux Users Group. "We held our second meeting at Bellingham Technical College (BTC) a month later."

Kubuntu looks nice but come on fellas, wireless input

Filed under
Ubuntu

Hands up all PC users who have a wireless mouse and keyboard?

Why Linux perfect system for people who hate computers?

Filed under
Linux

We've had computers powerful enough to be effortlessly useful for ages now. In fact, there is probably one in your attic. Even a 10-year-old PC will work perfectly well as a well-connected typewriter, which is all that most people want or need.

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More in Tux Machines

4MLinux 20.1 released.

This is a minor maintenance release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel. The release ships with the Linux kernel 4.4.34, which restores PAE support that "magically" disappeared in 4MLinux 20.0 (sorry :-). Additionally, some popular programs (Double Commander, Dropbox, Firefox, Java RE, Opera, PeaZip, Thunderbird, Wine) have been updated, too. Read more

Refracta 8.0 Is a Pint-Sized Powerhouse

Refracta is a somewhat obscure Linux distribution that offers exceptional functionality and stability. Obscurity is not always a bad thing when it comes to Linux distros. You can find some very worthwhile alternatives to your current operating system. Refracta is a big surprise in a small package. Many look-alike desktop distros are difficult to distinguish from run-of-the-mill garden varieties. Others offer new adopters something unique that makes using them fun and productive. Refracta is one of the few full-service Linux distros that makes an easy and more convenient replacement for pocket Linux options such as Puppy Linux. Not all Linux distros that install to a USB drive -- and have the ability to save files and system settings in a persistent mode -- work equally well. Read more

Clear Linux With Mesa 13 Is A Strong Match For Intel Linux Performance

When benchmarking Intel's Clear Linux distribution earlier this year we found its Intel graphics performance to be quite good and slightly faster than other Linux distributions even when Clear was using an older version of Mesa. Now with Clear Linux having switched to Mesa 13, I decided to run some fresh Intel OpenGL benchmarks on it compared to other distributions. Read more

PTS: PHP 7.1 vs. PHP 7.0 vs. HHVM Benchmarks

With today's PHP 7.1 release, performance isn't highlighted as much as language improvements to this first major update to PHP7, but I decided to run some PHP 7.1, PHP 7.0, PHP 5.6, PHP 5.5, and HHVM benchmarks of our open-source Phoronix Test Suite code-base. These self-tests of the Phoronix Test Suite aren't the conventional PHP workload of just a CMS, blog, or other web application that can be cached, etc, but effectively of a PHP CLI application. So keep this in mind when looking at the results and that your mileage may vary depending upon use-case. Read more