Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Openbox window manager grows up

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you want an adaptable window manager that doesn't drain your resources, try Openbox. Its latest version, 3.4.2, released this month, has several visual improvements and dozens of new usable features.

Ubuntu Linux's Achilles' Heel: It's Tough To Install On Laptops

Filed under
Ubuntu

Information Week: The wildly popular Linux distro isn't all it's cracked up to be, especially if you try to install it on a laptop, our reviewer Alex Wolfe finds. Come along on his Ubuntu safari, as he hacks his way through bug-fraught installation attempts.

Tux Paint gets a face lift

Filed under
Software

DesktopLinux: Five years after the debut of its popular open-source drawing program for children, New Breed Software announced the release of Tux Paint 0.9.17.

Linux: Granular

Filed under
Linux

dailykos.com: Granular offers a visually stunning KDE, certainly the nicest implementation of it in any distro I've yet reviewed; once everything is configured, you enter an alabaster screen that loads all the modules necessary to run the liveCD.

BA in BS on the OBS

Filed under
SUSE

wafaa.eu: The guys and gals over at openSUSE have been beavering away at enhancing a tool that is invaluable to the Bongo Project and many many others - the openSUSE Build Service (OBS for short). One of those enhancements is enabling statistics so packagers can see if the sweat and tears has been worth it.

How Microsoft crushed Linux's Chinese rebellion

Filed under
Microsoft

salon: Somehow, facing a market where piracy was rampant and the government openly pro-Linux, Microsoft turned it around. China, says Gates, will one day be Microsoft's biggest market.

TinyMe - The little distro that could

Filed under
Linux

Raiden's Realm: Having become a fan of PcLinuxOS after a recent review of their 2007 version, I've followed its development with interest. One of those is TinyMe, a live cd derivative of PCLOS, that offers you the best of its parent, with the small size common to "lite" distributions or "distros" as they're more commonly called.

Dual-booting XP and Linux - It’s really easy!

Filed under
HowTos

zdnet blogs: Over the past few weeks several people have asked me if it’s possible to set up a Windows XP/Linux dual-boot system on a PC that already has Windows XP installed on it, and if it’s possible, how easy is the process.

Amarok 2.0 Jingle Contest

Filed under
Software

dot.kde.org: The Amarok team needs your help. Amarok are looking for a new, shiny and fresh jingle to play at first start of Amarok 2.0 and are holding a contest to find one.

Catalog shopping comes to open-source software

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com: A free beta Web site unveiled yesterday from open-source consulting firm Optaros Inc. is designed to tackle that problem. The site, Enterprise Open Source Directory, is billed as a one-stop information repository on some 300 enterprise-ready open-source applications.

Lenovo Unveils Its Highest Performing Notebook: A Linux Workstation

Filed under
Hardware

Information Week: Lenovo on Tuesday introduced its highest performing notebook, a Linux mobile workstation powered by an Intel Centrino Pro processor.

Easy CD ripping with Konqueror

Filed under
HowTos

ITtoolbox Blogs: We live in a world of sound. Many sounds are jarring and loud like traffic or construction work. Other sounds are dull and boring like elevator music. Still more sounds are pleasant. The biggest problem is how to get the collection of silver plastic disks converted to electronic form for those portable grooving machines.

A beginner’s introduction to the GNU/Linux command line, Part II

Filed under
HowTos

FreeSoftware Mag: Your GNU/Linux computer is an amazing machine. It can display images. It can run programs. It can perform dozens of functions all at the same time. How can you keep track of all this activity? By monitoring the processes that your computer runs, and one of the best ways to monitor and control processes is by using the command line.

How “Wintel thinking” reduces productivity

Filed under
Misc

Paul Murphy: For many jobs there’s a PC way and a Unix way. For example, I write these blogs using vi under either CDE (Solaris 10) or Gnome (Solaris 9) and just embed references and format information as I go along. The result is extremely portable because the text is independent of the format.

The Future of Publishing with Linux Magazines

Filed under
Linux

OSWeekly: Not too long ago, I subscribed to a Linux magazine for beginners called Tux. Fantastic magazine, but the last I heard they were "headed out," so to speak, due largely to a lack of funding. Now we are presented with the question: will Full Circle Magazine fall victim to the same fate as the once beloved Tux Magazine? Not likely. Why?

NoMachine NX 3.0 improves remote access to Linux boxes

Filed under
Software

linux.com: NoMachine recently released version 3.0 of its remote desktop product line. NX 3.0 has some interesting advantages over similar products -- but also some pitfalls for inexperienced users.

Preview: Mozilla Lightning

Filed under
Moz/FF

synergymx: There is a distinct lack of good applications for tracking your calendar, email, and tasks all in one location. Some applications do email but not calendar, where as others do calendars without email. As a business user there is a connection between the two.

Kernel space: Progress on ACPI and power management

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: Len Brown can only be a glutton for punishment; he is, after all, the maintainer of the Linux ACPI subsystem. That is a difficult position to be in: ACPI involves getting into the BIOS layer, an area of system software which is not always known for careful, high-quality work.

Why is Everything so Stupid on Windows?

Filed under
Microsoft

Penguin Pete: Check out what happens when a tool that has been a standard part of Unix - for what 30 years now? - gets ported to Windows for the first time. Here is "wingrep", the grep for Windows. So, today, class, we will learn all about (writing it on the chalkboard and underlining it twice) grep!:

Mandriva advances into Korea, the IT hub of Asia

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva Press Release: Mandriva Korea (MetaNav) begins operations in order to offer Mandriva Linux solutions to organizations and people all over South Korea and the East Asia area.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Atom Installer
    One thing that I miss about using Ubuntu is PPA’s there are lot’s of PPA in Ubuntu and you can hack around and install all types of software which are required for your usage. In the Fedora side of the world there are copr repos but they don’t have as many repos as in Ubuntu and you can’t build non-free software (don’t get me wrong here, I love FREEdom software but couldn’t resist not using some beautiful non-free applications such as Sublime). I am creating a work around for this by using shell scripts which are open source (cc0) but when those scripts are executed they install non-free software on your system.
  • MKVToolNix 9.9.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New GUI Improvements, More
    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced today, February 20, 2017, the release and general availability of MKVToolNix 9.9.0 "Pick Up" for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. MKVToolNix 9.9.0 represents a month of hard work, during which the developer managed to add a bunch of new and interesting features, fix as many bugs reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.8.0 point release, as well as to improve the build system, especially in regards to the man pages of the software.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.2 and KDE Applications 16.12.2, More
    The developers behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system have announced today the immediate availability of all the latest KDE technologies released this month in the stable repositories of the distribution. Yes, we're talking about the KDE Plasma 5.9.2 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, and KDE Development Platform 4.14.29, all of which can be found in your Chakra GNU/Linux's repos if you want to run the newest KDE software.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • IOTA: IoT revolutionized with a Ledger
    Ever since the introduction of digital money, the world quickly came to realize how dire and expensive the consequences of centralized systems are. Not only are these systems incredibly expensive to maintain, they are also “single points of failures” which expose a large number of users to unexpected service interruptions, fraudulent activities and vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious hackers. Thanks to Blockchain, which was first introduced through Bitcoin in 2009, the clear benefits of a decentralized and “trustless” transactional settlement system became apparent. No longer should expensive trusted third parties be used for handling transactions, instead, the flow of money should be handled in a direct, Peer-to-Peer fashion. This concept of a Blockchain (or more broadly, a distributed ledger) has since then become a global phenomenon attracting billions of dollars in investments to further develop the concept.
  • Return Home and Unify: My Case for Unity 8
  • Can netbooks be cool again?
    Earlier this week, my colleague Chaim Gartenberg covered a laptop called the GPD Pocket, which is currently being funded on Indiegogo. As Chaim pointed out, the Pocket’s main advantage is its size — with a 7-inch screen, the thing is really, really small — and its price, a reasonable $399. But he didn’t mention that the Pocket is the resurrection of one of the most compelling, yet fatally flawed, computing trends of the ‘00s: the netbook. So after ten years, are netbooks finally cool again? That might be putting it too strongly, but I’m willing to hope.

Linux Devices

  • Compact, rugged module runs Linux or Android on Apollo Lake
    Ubiqcomm’s 95 x 95mm, Apollo Lake-based “COM-AL6C” COM offers 4K video along with multiple SATA, USB, GbE, and PCIe interfaces, plus -40 to 85°C operation. Ubiqconn Technology Inc. has announced a “COM-AL6C” COM Express Type 6 Compact form factor computer-on-module built around Intel’s Apollo Lake processors and designed to withstand the rigors of both fixed and mobile industrial applications. The module offers a choice among three Intel Apollo Lake processors: the quad-core Atom x5-E3930, quad-core x5-E3940, and dual-core x7-E3950, which are clocked at up to 2.0GHz burst and offer TDPs from 6.5 to 12 Watts.
  • Internet-enable your microcontroller projects for under $6 with ESP8266
    To get started with IoT (the Internet of Things), your device needs, well, an Internet connection. Base Arduino microcontrollers don't have Internet connectivity by default, so you either need to add Ethernet, Wi-Fi shields, or adapters to them, or buy an Arduino that has built-in Internet connectivity. In addition to complexity, both approaches add cost and consume the already-precious Arduino flash RAM for program space, which limits what you can do. Another approach is to use a Raspberry Pi or similar single-board computer that runs a full-blown operating system like Linux. The Raspberry Pi is a solid choice in many IoT use cases, but it is often overkill when all you really want to do is read a sensor and send the reading up to a server in the cloud. Not only does the Raspberry Pi potentially drive up the costs, complexity, and power consumption of your project, but it is running a full operating system that needs to be patched, and it has a much larger attack surface than a simple microcontroller. When it comes to IoT devices and security, simpler is better, so you can spend more time making and less time patching what you already made.
  • Blinkenlights!
  • Blinkenlights, part 2
  • Blinkenlights, part 3
  • [Older] Shmoocon 2017: The Ins And Outs Of Manufacturing And Selling Hardware
    Every day, we see people building things. Sometimes, useful things. Very rarely, this thing becomes a product, but even then we don’t hear much about the ins and outs of manufacturing a bunch of these things or the economics of actually selling them. This past weekend at Shmoocon, [Conor Patrick] gave the crowd the inside scoop on selling a few hundred two factor authentication tokens. What started as a hobby is now a legitimate business, thanks to good engineering and abusing Amazon’s distribution program.
  • 1.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users NEVER use a PC, 200 Million PC Internet Users never use a mobile phone. Understanding the 3.5 Billion Internet Total Audience
    As I am working to finish the 2017 Edition of the TomiAhonen Almanac (last days now) I always get into various updates of numbers, that remind me 'I gotta tell this story'.. For example the internet user numbers. We have the December count by the ITU for year 2016, that says the world has now 3.5 Billion internet users in total (up from 3.2 Billion at the end of year 2015). So its no 'drama' to know what is 'that' number. The number of current internet total users is yes, 3.5 Billion, almost half of the planet's total population (47%).