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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Bash bits, nibbles and bytes: Handling command line arguments

Filed under
HowTos

blogs.ittoolbox.com: There are plenty of tutorials out on the web but they tend to shove a whole lot down your throat in one big hard to swallow gob. I intend to make short, sharp and shiny snippets so it is easy to understand and use.

Torrentflux — web-based BitTorrent client

Filed under
Software
HowTos

polishlinux.org: The Bittorrent network is becoming increasingly popular and perfectly legal. It allows to download the latest movies, music or, to say the least, almost every Linux distribution available.

Ubuntu: How To Change Wallpaper Easily With Wallpapoz

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: Wallpapoz is an easy to use wallpaper changer application for GNOME. If you love to collect wallpapers, and like your desktop to change wallpaper at regular interval, then Wallpapoz is right for you.

How to Become a Linux Guru

Filed under
Linux

computoredge.com: It's an observed fact that some people are good with computers, and other people aren't. We call the good ones gurus and the rest users. How do you tell the difference?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux keeps landing in the mainstream

  • Is public domain software open-source?
  • Partitioning for Linux
  • GNOME 2.22 Release Candidate
  • Here’s my problem with many rogue coders, hackers, Open Source cultists
  • Novell's PR director leaves to change the world
  • Report: Open Source Adoption Increases App Dev Pay
  • Fedora, Getting Involved Guide (GIG)
  • modprobe returns Invalid kernel module Format
  • Five Main Advantages of Open Source for Enterprise Solutions
  • Firefox, Or Pigfoot?
  • Howto Install Clam AntiVirus with GTK frontend GUI
  • Demystifying a Wireless Network
  • Inside the SFLC's guide to legal management of FOSS projects
  • Open source makes a healthy site for healthy eaters
  • Open source gains business credibility

Full Circle Magazine Issue 10 Released

Filed under
Ubuntu

Can you believe it? We’re already at our tenth issue! Highlights include: Linux Mint Install, How-To : Compile from Source, and Review of the ASUS EEE PC running Xubuntu.

Distro Review: Foresight Linux 1.4.2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: After some delay and threatening over the last couple of weeks I've finally gotten around to typing up my review of Foresight Linux. Foresight is a distro I've been interested in for quite some time, I knew it had a lot of cutting edge features but I was a little worried about the stability issues that might cause. Would my concerns prove to be unfounded?

Battle of the Ultra-Mobile Linux Laptops: Cloudbook vs. EeePC vs. My Old Thinkpad

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

popsci.com: Let's take a look at the main contenders in the Linux-powered ultraportable world—the Asus EeePC and the Everex Cloudbook--and, as a control, my four-year-old IBM Thinkpad X31 running Ubuntu Linux. Sure, the X31 is not as crazy-svelte, but in its day it was about as small as they came, and still serves as an impressively compact workhorse to this day. And best of all, the three of them can be had for $400, so let's see what's possible with each.

Open source software and recycled gear equals PCs for needy schools

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: One person's trash is another's treasure, and this weekend open source vendors and community members plan to join forces with a Northern Californian recycling organization to transform hundreds of desktop and laptops into PCs loaded with Ubuntu, Firefox, OpenOffice and more to be donated to needy area schools.

Tasky on Foresight 2

Filed under
Software

silwenae.org: Tasky is a new task management application for the GNOME desktop. Written by Boyd Timothy, Tasky features syncing with Remember the Milk, but doesn’t feature the ability to use RTM tags yet. Tasky is a great way to help implement and use Getting Things Done.

When Sally met Eddie: The Fedora package story

Filed under
Linux

redhatmagazine.com: There are lots of ways that software gets included in Fedora releases. Because Fedora is a community-powered Linux distribution, the most common (and likely the easiest) method is when a community member packages and “owns” the task of building it for Fedora. This story follows that process.

Defense Planting Seeds of Doubt; Is the Reiser Son to be Believed?

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: The Hans Reiser defense on Thursday zeroed in on the case's only eyewitness -- the Linux programmer's 8-year-old son: A child psychologist took the stand in a bid to convince jurors that the boy, when he was 6, saw his mother Nina Reiser walk out of the Oakland hills house where prosecutors said she never left alive.

White Asus Eee briefly spotted today at Amazon.com

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

theinquirer.net: ANYONE IN NEED of an affordable yet very portable micro-laptop with plenty of battery life has been keeping an eye on the ASUS Eee. But the long awaited 8G version in white colour has been as easy to get as a Wii at Crimble.

Elonex £99 Eee PC rival to arrive in June

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: Elonex has rolled out its sub-£100 Linux-based laptop, the One, but it looks like it's going to prove harder get hold of than Asus Eee PC has been. Elonex today unveiled black, pink, green, white and silver Ones to whet buyers' appetites.

Novell Reports Financial Results for First Fiscal Quarter 2008

Filed under
SUSE

earthtimes.org (pr): Novell, Inc. today announced financial results for its first fiscal quarter ended Jan. 31, 2008. For the quarter, Novell reported net revenue of $231 million. This compares to net revenue of $218 million for the first fiscal quarter 2007.

SystemRescueCD

Filed under
Linux

fosswire.com: Bad things happen, and sometimes those bad things will happen to your computer, or a computer you are responsible for. SystemRescueCD includes a whole host of tools that are very useful. If you are already a Linux whiz, you have a full command line available to you. As well as the command line side of things, the CD also has a GUI available, which uses WindowMaker.

How big a threat is good Microsoft?

Filed under
Microsoft

Dana Blankenhorn: All this “good Microsoft” stuff about supporting open source, abut placing code on Codeplex, and about keeping open source projects “in the loop” regarding format changes, is no head fake. It’s serious. This is the new strategy. Kill open source with kindness.

Also: Microsoft's Ballmer On Windows Server, Yahoo, Linux

Ubuntu Brainstorm Site Takes the Community Pulse

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.wired.com: Ubuntu has launched a new community feedback site, dubbed Brainstorm, where users can post ideas and suggest improvements they'd like to see in the popular Linux distribution. You can also comment and vote on other people's suggestions and ideas for improving Ubuntu.

KDE Desktop Environment of the Year 2007, Apps Finish Strongly

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The 2007 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award winners have been announced. KDE leads the popularity list in the category Desktop Environment with a rocking 52% percent of the votes leaving competing contenders in its dust.

Everex CloudBook First Thoughts Review

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

tabletpcreview.com: The Everex CloudBook marks the latest entry to the expanding world of UMPC-type subnotebooks at affordable prices. With a 7-inch display, 1.2GHz processor, and 30GB hard drive, the CloudBook certainly doesn't make a very good desktop replacement computer, but it does look like one impressive little road warrior. What did we think of the CloudBook after one day in our office? The answers may surprise you.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: DNS Checkers, Alternatives to Adobe Software, Fake Hollywood Hacker Terminal and More

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu Site, Marble Maps, Kube in Randa, and UX in GNOME

  • Call for design: Artful Banner for Kubuntu.org website
    Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.
  • Randa 2017 Report – Marble Maps
    Just came back home yesterday from Randa Meetings 2017. This year, even though my major motive for the sprint was to use Qt 5.8’s Qt Speech module instead of custom Java for text-to-speech during navigation, that could not be achieved because of a bug which made the routes not appear in the app in the first place. And this bug is reproducible both by using latest code, and old-enough code, and is even there in the prod app in the Google Play Store itself. So, although most of my time had gone in deep-diving on the issue, unfortunately I was not able to find the root-cause to it eventually. I will need to pick up on that in the coming weeks again when I get time, to get it fixed.
  • Kube in Randa
    I’ve spent the last few days with fellow KDE hackers in beautiful Randa in the Swiss Mountains. It’s an annual event that focuses on a specific topic every year, and this time accessibility was up, so Michael and me made our way up here to improve Kube in that direction (and to enjoy the scenic surroundings of course).
  • Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes
    In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13. When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use. To make sure our programs can be used by our intended audience, we need usability testing. Usability is basically asking the question, "Can people easily use this thing?" or "Can real people use the software to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time?" Usability is crucial to the creative process of building anything user-based. If real people can't use our software, then all the hard work of creating it is pointless. [...] In early 2016, GNOME decided to make a major UI update to its Settings application. This visual refresh shifts from an icon-based menu to drop-down lists and adds important changes to several individual Settings panels. The GNOME design team wanted to test these early-stage design changes to see how easily real people could navigate the new GNOME Settings application. Previously, GNOME relied on traditional usability tests, where users explore the software's UI directly. But this wouldn't work, since the software updates hadn't been completed.

FSF, GNU and FSFE

  • LibrePlanet 2018: Let's talk about Freedom. Embedded.
    The call for sessions is open now, until November 2nd, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. Pre-order a LibrePlanet 10th anniversary t-shirt when you register to attend! Do you want to discuss or teach others about a topic relevant to the free software community? You've got until Thursday, November 2nd, 2017 at 10:00 EDT (14:00 UTC) to submit your session proposals. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and everyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, CFP and registration open now
    The call for proposals is open now, until November 2, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and anyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • dot-zed extractor
  • FSFE Newsletter - September 2017

    To push our demand, the FSFE launched a new campaign last week: "Public Money Public Code". The campaign explains the benefits of releasing publicly funded Software under free licences with a short inspiring video and an open letter to sign. Furthermore, the campaign and the open letter will be used in the coming months until the European Parliament election in 2019 to highlight good and bad examples of publicly funded software development and its potential reuse.

  • Free Software Foundation Europe Leads Call For Taxpayer-Funded Software To Be Licensed For Free Re-use
    Considered objectively, it's hard to think of any good reasons why code that is paid for by the public should not be released publicly as a matter of course. The good news is that this "public money, public code" argument is precisely the approach that open access advocates have used with considerable success in the field of academic publishing, so there's hope it might gain some traction in the world of software too.

Security: WordPress 4.8.2, CCleaner 5.33, Apache Patch and Cryptocurrencies

  • WordPress 4.8.2 Security and Maintenance Release
    WordPress 4.8.2 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.
  • Attack on CCleaner Highlights the Importance of Securing Downloads and Maintaining User Trust
    Some of the most worrying kinds of attacks are ones that exploit users’ trust in the systems and softwares they use every day. Yesterday, Cisco’s Talos security team uncovered just that kind of attack in the computer cleanup software CCleaner. Download servers at Avast, the company that owns CCleaner, had been compromised to distribute malware inside CCleaner 5.33 updates for at least a month. Avast estimates that over 2 million users downloaded the affected update. Even worse, CCleaner’s popularity with journalists and human rights activists means that particularly vulnerable users are almost certainly among that number. Avast has advised CCleaner Windows users to update their software immediately. This is often called a “supply chain” attack, referring to all the steps software takes to get from its developers to its users. As more and more users get better at bread-and-butter personal security like enabling two-factor authentication and detecting phishing, malicious hackers are forced to stop targeting users and move “up” the supply chain to the companies and developers that make software. This means that developers need to get in the practice of “distrusting” their own infrastructure to ensure safer software releases with reproducible builds, allowing third parties to double-check whether released binary and source packages correspond. The goal should be to secure internal development and release infrastructure to that point that no hijacking, even from a malicious actor inside the company, can slip through unnoticed.
  • Apache bug leaks contents of server memory for all to see—Patch now
    There's a bug in the widely used Apache Web Server that causes servers to leak pieces of arbitrary memory in a way that could expose passwords or other secrets, a freelance journalist has disclosed. The vulnerability can be triggered by querying a server with what's known as an OPTIONS request. Like the better-known GET and POST requests, OPTIONS is a type of HTTP method that allows users to determine which HTTP requests are supported by the server. Normally, a server will respond with GET, POST, OPTIONS, and any other supported methods. Under certain conditions, however, responses from Apache Web Server include the data stored in computer memory. Patches are available here and here.
  • The Pirate Bay Takes Heat for Testing Monero Mining
    Cryptocurrencies usually are mined with CPU power initially, she told LinuxInsider. Users then find ways to speed up the hashing before going to GPU. They build specialized hardware and field programmable gate array (FPGA) chips to carry out the hashing function in order to mine much faster. [...] The notion that The Pirate Bay effectively would borrow resources from its own users is not the problem, suggested Jessica Groopman, principal analyst at Tractica.