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Thursday, 05 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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GP2X Searches For The World's Best Programming Talent

Filed under
Gaming

GP32/2X Distribution Ltd and Gamepark Holdings today challenged up and coming designers to develop a game or application that will run on the GP2X - the fast growing Linux-based handheld gaming and entertainment console,

Brainstorming ways to push open source

Filed under
OSS

Having the latest computer technology is great. But what e-government users from the public sector as well as citizens really want is software interoperability. Unfortunately IT managers still only pay lip service to such interoperability, concludes a European project assessing today’s open-source movement.

Libranet's last goodbye

Filed under
Linux

After six months, the Libranet community has learned that its wait for the revival of the distribution was futile. Tal Danzig, Libranet's owner and chief developer, has announced that he is discontinuing the development of Libranet.

DRM - Is It Worth Going To Jail For?

Filed under
Linux

In the spirit of all who chanced civil disobedience for their cause, this is offered as what NOT to do...under any circumstance. Not only would it be illegal (possibly a RICO case) it could temporarily devastate the retail businesses involved. Enough so that the effects would be newsworthy...and that is exactly the desired effect.

How to build a Linux router - Part 2

Filed under
HowTos

Last time on the "How to build a Linux router - Part 1" we installed Fedora Core 4 as the operating system. In this part, we will be configuring the operating system to handle our routing for us, as well as throw in some added perks such as a upnp server, local caching nameserver, and DHCP server.

OSU open source founders leaving

Filed under
OSS

The founders of Oregon State University's Open Source Lab are leaving the organization to run a Portland startup, the school announced Thursday, creating a void at the top of one of the state's best-known open source organizations.

Losses double for SCO Group

Filed under
Misc

The SCO Group Inc.'s net loss for the fiscal second quarter more than doubled from a year ago, hampered by litigation expenses that totaled nearly $3.8 million in the quarter.

Build a Desktop with Kubuntu 6.06 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Kubuntu is one great distribution. It has something for everyone. This How-To is going to cover as much as I can. Its strengths lie in Debian and the Apt-Get package management system. The 2.6 kernel has come a long way and will run on anything from an old 486 to the modern Duocore cpu's along with everything in between. So Lets get to It!!!.

The Software Wars map

Filed under
OS

Ever wonder what map might be hanging inside Fortress Gates, the super-secret center from which Lord Gates and his evil minion, Steve "the Undertaker" Ballmer, run the Evil Empire? Well, no I haven't either, but that hasn't stopped Steven Hilton.

Red Hat, JBoss execs call for Java openness

Filed under
OSS

At the Red Hat Summit, the annual convergence of users and partners of the Durham, N.C.-based commercial Linux vendor held here last week, Yeaton was joined by Shaun Connolly, vice president of product management at JBoss. The two open source executives took the opportunity to grouse about the current state of Java, touch upon plans for virtualization and rally on the need for openness by companies like Microsoft.

Installing Linux (Keeping Windows)

Filed under
HowTos

If you have been using Windows for any length of time you will have acquired some expertise and probably built up a collection of files you don't want to lose, two reasons why you might think moving to Linux is going to be too much trouble. It isn't, trust me.

How To Samba With Suse 10.1 And Windows XP

Filed under
HowTos

This guide is intended for those using Suse 10.1 and Samba with the firewall (SuSEfirewall2) enabled. It applies to machines in workgroups only, not domains. Samba works great out of the box with Suse 10.1 however the firewall adds some complexity to the issue. This guide was created from my attempts to make accessing all shares and printers on my Windows/Linux network work perfectly.

LinuxWorld SF looms

Filed under
Linux

IDG World Expo announced the exhibitor and keynote speaker line-ups for this summer's LinuxWorld Conference & Expo, themed "Fifteen Years of Breaking the Rules" and scheduled for Aug. 14-17, 2006 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco.

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Windows Vista Beta 2 now freely available

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft has opened up its new work in progress operating system Windows Vista Beta 2 for public scrutiny. However, be warned. You'll need pretty highly configured hardware to run it and a very fast internet connection to download the 3.5GB 32-bit or 4.4GB 64-bit version.

The Apache Software Foundation Announces Call for Participation for ApacheCon US 2006

Filed under
Software

The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) has announced the Call for Participation for ApacheCon US 2006, its 9th official conference. Lauded among the leading success stories in the Open Source community, the ASF stewards, incubates, and develops leading Open Source projects, including Apache HTTP Server, the world's most popular Web server software.

Breaking News: GNU/Hurd 1.0 Released!

Filed under
Humor

In what some are calling the most shocking development since the invention of fire, Richard M. Stallman today unveiled the first official release of the GNU Project's operating system kernel, GNU/Hurd 1.0.0.

My Penguin, The Doctor

Filed under
Linux

Many people in the Linux community know that its an operating system built to handle the most mission-critical of jobs. In fact, Linux is so stable, it can handle the most mission-critical job of all: managing the human heart.

Software Squashes Bugs With Help From Users, Open Source

Filed under
OSS

New open source software is being put to use by open source projects including Evolution, Gaim, theGimp, Gnome, Rhythmbox and others can more quickly find the worst bugs, including those that are causing hangups for most users. In turn, users can automatically report back on software quality with a program known as the Cooperative Bug Isolation Project.

Book review: Learning Perl

Filed under
Reviews

The book Learning Perl will teach the reader how to begin writing code using the Perl language. The authors are not new to this subject matter. It would be hard to find a more qualified group to learn from. O’Reilly publishes this work in their familiar style and format. This book is commonly referred to as the Llama book.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: The Latest

  • Fedora’s Love For Python Continues
    In this digital age, there is still some use for having messaging that is easy to distribute and consume. While it may seem quaint and old-fashioned, hard-copy content is a useful way to deliver information at events like conferences and meetups.
  • Fedora account system and FreeIPA
    Over the years, a number of times, people have asked us about migrating from our own custom Fedora Account System (FAS) to FreeIPA.
  • Testing FreeIPA in openQA
    openQA has some integration with Open vSwitch and it’s what the SUSE folks use, so I went with that. You basically have to create a tap device for each worker instance and use something like OVS to connect those devices together with a virtual bridge or whatever so the test VMs can communicate. The VMs also need to access the per-job web server that os-autoinst runs for the worker to upload logs to and download scripts to run from (in some cases), so in the reference set up you have that bind to the bridge interface and ensure the firewalling is set up so the VMs can reach it. And if you need the VMs to have access to the external network, as we do for FreeIPA testing (dnf and rolekit just do not want to work without access to the repositories), you have to basically set up NAT routing for the traffic from the VMs. It’s lots of network configuration fun!

Leftovers: Debian

  • The Pyra - handheld computer with Debian preinstalled
    The machine is a complete ARM-based PC with micro HDMI, SATA, USB plugs and many others connectors, and include a full keyboard and a 5" LCD touch screen. The 6000mAh battery is claimed to provide a whole day of battery life time, but I have not seen any independent tests confirming this. The vendor is still collecting preorders, and the last I heard last night was that 22 more orders were needed before production started.
  • New sources for contributors.debian.org
    Many people might not be aware of it, but since a couple of years ago, we have an excellent tool for tracking and recognising contributors to the Debian Project: Debian Contributors Debian is a big project, and there are many people working that do not have great visibility, specially if they are not DDs or DMs. We are all volunteers, so it is very important that everybody gets credited for their work. No matter how small or unimportant they might think their work is, we need to recognise it!
  • What's new since Jessie?
    Jessie was released one year ago now and the Java Team has been busy preparing the next release.

Leftovers: OSS

  • The New Kingmakers and the Next Step for Open Source
  • Puppet Rebrands, Launches Numerous New Projects
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Fast-forward to today, and Puppet Labs is changing its name to mark a new era, and is out with several new product initiatives. The organization, now known as just Puppet, has also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who comes to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president.
  • Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    After taking a break in 2015, Tracing is back at Plumbers this year! Tracing is heavily used throughout the Linux ecosystem, and provides an essential method for extracting information about the underlying code that is running on the system. Although tracing is simple in concept, effective usage and implementation can be quite involved.
  • Jeremy Sands: Southern Fried College Football and Down-Home Linux
    This is a “Meet the Man Behind the Curtain” interview. It’s more about Sands than about either csnbbs.com or the LinuxFest he spends so much of his time organizing. But at the end of the interview, he talks about how the LinuxFest can always use more volunteers, even if all you can do is woman or man the registration desk for an hour. And sponsors? It’s a pretty healthy operation financially, but more sponsors are always welcome — especially ones from the Southeast, because this conference is proudly regional, not something identical to what you might find in, say, Los Angeles or Washington State.
  • A daughter of Silicon Valley shares her 'nerd' story
    In the end, I had to leave my job at ISC. Luckily, my work and my values brought me to Mozilla, where I've been both perseverant and lucky enough to have several meaningful roles. Today, I'm the senior program manager of diversity and inclusion. I work full-time on building a more diverse and inclusive Mozilla, standing on the shoulders of giants who did the same before me and in partnership with many of the smartest and kindest people I know. I've followed my passion for empowering people to find meaningful ways to contribute to the Internet I believe the world needs: an expansion of the one that excited me so long ago. And I get to see a lot of the world while I do it!
  • Waiting for Plugins: The Nylas N1 Email Client
    I wish the Nylas N1 team the best. I love that they took the time to build a Linux client. I love the idea of a hackable email client. But Nylas N1, as it stands now, is very limited. If you happen to like the defaults, you’re in for a treat. But if you’re looking for an email client that bends to your will and that you can easily customize as a non-developer, you’re probably better off with Thunderbird (especially now that people are thinking about its future). Thunderbird isn’t pretty—certainly not as pretty as Nylas N1—but it lets you build it into whatever email client you want it to be.
  • RightScale, Focused on the Cloud, Delivers Docker Container Management
  • Drupal developer on how to make your website more accessible
    For open source developer Mike Gifford, founder and president of OpenConcept Consulting Inc., any mention of Drupal accessibility after his name is redundant. He has spent the better part of 10 years improving and cementing accessibility in Drupal, enough to earn the role of official core accessibility maintainer for the project. Accessibility awareness has grown considerably in the Drupal community, but the Internet changes rapidly and the software needs to keep up to remain relevant. Recent press on the trend of decoupling Drupal—including the milestone post by project founder Dries Buytaert himself—tends to skirt the issue that so-called headless configurations can blot out accessibility functions designed for the theme layer.
  • DuckDuckGo Gives $225,000 to Open Source Projects
    It appears as if people have been using DuckDuckGo’s privacy centered search enough to make the company successful. Certainly not we-control-the-world successful like Google, but successful enough to give it some cash-on-hand breathing room. Also successful enough for the company to give back to the community by handing out $225,000 to some free and open source projects.
  • DuckDuckGo's 2016 open source donations
  • H2020 submission is rather 'anti-open'
    So what's the EC's current stand with forcing citizens to use Adobe's proprietary, closed technology and only Windows or Mac for submission of H2020 projects? With Adobe retiring Linux versions of Acrobat a couple of years ago (yes you can still download an obsolete version for Linux from Adobe's FTP but it won't work with ECAS "A forms"), this is a very "anti-open" situation.
  • It's Time to Open Source Moving Vehicles
    Open source software has made its mark on desktop computing, mobile phones, and the internet of things. But one area yet to be cracked wide open with freely distributed software is mobility: from autonomous cars, software-assisted driving, to connecting vehicles to other devices. On Wednesday, Arthur Taylor, chief technology officer at Advanced Telematic Systems, presented an open-source platform that he hopes will be the start of more innovation in software development for mobility technologies. But he also argued for the merits of open source software in a space pretty much dominated by the closed-off products of large corporates, such as Google and Uber.
  • Next Phase of Development Begins for The Hovalin, An Open Source 3D Printed Violin
    The Hovalin, developed by Matt and Kaitlyn Hova, is a open source 3D printed violin that has received much attention since the first version was released. Now the next phase of development has begun for the Hovalin 3.0, and Matt Hova has posted a blog entry and started a Reddit thread about the project that always keeps improving in a collaborative effort by many Hovalin fans. In the Hovalin website blog post, Hova explains what the most recent plans are for the latest version. First, version 3.0 will “move away from the current carbon fiber rectangle to an 8 mm rod.” Also, a lock will be created that will be used to keep the top and bottom pieces together. Custom brims to prevent warping will be added, as well as possible chin and shoulder rests. Finally, Hova wants to “work out a new system for distributing multiple options for the .stls including files with brim, files without brim, pre-sliced files with supports for the middle piece.” There are many changes in the works here, as you can see from just this list alone.

Openwashing