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Wednesday, 22 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Git 2.0.3 Version Control System Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 7:41pm
Story How 3D Printing Is Making Better Movie Monsters Rianne Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 6:30pm
Story Open-Source AMD Users Report Hawaii GPU Acceleration Is Working Rianne Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 5:11pm
Story Android L 4.5 / 5 ‘Lollipop’ Release Date, News, Rumors: Nexus, HTC Will Support Android L; Samsung, Sony, Motorola, LG Support Not Confirmed Rianne Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 5:07pm
Story Interview with Jim Hall, GUADEC Keynote Speaker Rianne Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 4:59pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 4:31pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 4:30pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 4:30pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 11:49am
Story OpenDaylight: One open source SDN controller to rule them all? Roy Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 7:50am

Linux: A Search Engine’s View

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: In May’s issue of Linux Journal, their segment “LJ Index” featured some tidbits or trends about which countries are actually Googling “Linux.” It is always interesting where Linux is gaining public interest, which countries are falling behind.

OOo stuff

Filed under
OOo
  • Review: OpenOffice.org Beta Fails the Office 2007 Test

  • OpenOffice.org 3.0 beta shrugs off X11
  • Having different layout and page numbering within a document
  • Test Drive OpenOffice 3 Beta in Ubuntu
  • OpenOffice.org, Now Home to Attractive Release Notes

Mandriva One it is

Filed under
Linux

jmcg.livejournal: I replaced the Mepis 6 partition with Mandriva One. The laptop is a dual boot with Win XP which I need to retain because of the accounting application I use for my small business. The problem was that the new naming scheme for hard drives has made a mess of what used to be a simple procedure.

Review: openSUSE 11 Beta 2

Filed under
SUSE

ostoolbox.blogspot: openSUSE 11 is currently in beta still, and will be officially released in June. I downloaded and installed it using the KDE 4 LiveCD, but was rather disappointed with what I saw.

Also: Review: openSUSE 11 Beta2

CNR supports Linux Mint, adds Weatherbug

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux.com: Linspire has upgraded its CNR.com (Click'N'Run) download site for Linux software to support the Ubuntu-based, consumer-friendly Linux Mint distribution. CNR.com will also add a Linux version of Weatherbug's weather service, which offers live, local weather information and severe weather alerts.

Also: Pinheads and Patriots

Ubuntu 8.04: Upgrade or clean install?

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: Which path should you follow? Should you take advantage of Ubuntu's package manager and use it to upgrade your system to the latest 8.04 Hardy Heron release, or should you download a CD or DVD ISO image and do a clean install?

Free software takes on Microsoft Office

Filed under
Software

reuters.com: Ninety percent of the users don't need all the functionality that Office provides. More demanding users who don't want to pay may look to Symphony and its cousin, OpenOffice, a package developed by a nonprofit group that includes a database program and drawing software.

Samba 3.2 reflects open source project’s ambivalence toward Microsoft

Filed under
Software

blogs.zdnet.com: Samba’s forthcoming version 3.2 release capitalizes on Microsoft’s interoperability commitments while also guarding against patent covenants that threaten the GPL.

Fedora rescuecd vs. Debian netinst

Filed under
Linux
Software

vsingleton.blogspot: Other than a few obtuse references to some of the features of the Fedora 8 rescuecd, I could not easily figure out how to install Fedora 8 (fc8) in a similar fashion to Debian's netinst installer.

Linux + UMPC = Smokin' Hot

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

junauza.com: Ultra-Mobile Personal Computers (UMPC) are so hot right now that major PC manufacturers are competing to create the lightest, fastest and sexiest-looking portable machines imaginable. Most of these emerging sub-notebooks are pre-installed with Linux, and I wasn't surprised.

Rootkits, the who's what's and whys in kitting the box

Filed under
Software

thelinuxsociety.org.uk: The idea of this guide is to make you aware of rootkits, what they can do, their history, and the varying different type of rootkits. I'm also going to discuss couple of possible countermeasures and steps that you can take to defend your self against rootkits.

Gzip, Bzip2 and Lzma compared

Filed under
Software

blog.i-no.de: There has recently been a discussion about GNU switching from bzip2 to lzma for their distributed tarballs. They still offer gzip tarballs as an alternative. However, Gentoo has been preferring the bzip2 tarballs mostly due to the improved pack ratio of bzip2. Unfortunately, the software for lzma is not (yet) as mature as some would like.

Ubuntu tips & tricks

Filed under
Ubuntu

1. Play youtube videos directly in Totem Movie Player (Hardy)...
4. To customize most of the colors of your ubuntu...
5. To download youtube videos and convert them to .avi...

13 useful tips

The future of PHP

Filed under
News

Discover PHP's new features and syntax improvements and see how they will take this already-popular scripting language to the next level. Learn how Unicode support, Web 2.0 features, and other changes make PHP V6 more robust, as well as more international.

Areca: Linux desktop backups made easy

Filed under
Software

liquidat.wordpress: In the last years several projects were started to provide user friendly solutions for the backup of Linux desktop machines. Despite their advantages they all suffer from stalled development: all mentioned projects are effectively dead at the moment. There is only one exception: the little known Areca.

Firefox: Can browsers make bucks?

Filed under
Moz/FF

bbc.co.uk/blogs: What's the most valuable piece of web software you use every day? Your web browser, surely. So whoever makes the browser which dominates the market should also make riches beyond the dreams of avarice - shouldn't they?

The best and worst docks for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

linuxowns.wordpress: Docks became popular when Mac began using them in their operating system. But these days docks are available on all platforms. So which ones should you avoid and which ones should you use?

The HP Mini-Note 2133 with Ubuntu is pretty sweet

Filed under
SUSE

blog.lostlake.org: I got a mini-note 2133. It came with SUSE. I tried, repeatedly to do the most simple operations and it just sucked. So, I installed Ubuntu and the Mini-Note turned into a great machine.

Top Ten Reasons for a Linux Laptop

Filed under
Humor

reallylinux.com: In a bit of off the cuff humor, I've created another Linux Top Ten Countdown. It's nowhere near as funny without a drum roll, so perhaps you may wish to download and listen to one while reading the list.

SourceForge® Implements OpenID Technology

Filed under
OSS

SourceForge today announced inclusion of the OpenID functionality in their SourceForge.net website. SourceForge.net users can now log in with an OpenID and receive a corresponding SourceForge.net identity for use at other sites that support OpenID logins.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 17.10 Users Get Major Kernel Update, 20 Security Vulnerabilities Patched

If you're using the latest Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system on your personal computer, you should know that it received it's first major kernel update since the official release back in October 19, 2017. The update addresses a total of 20 security vulnerabilities for Ubuntu 17.10's Linux 4.13 kernel packages, including the Raspberry Pi 2 one. Among the security issues patched in this update, five are related to Linux kernel's USB subsystem, including a use-after-free vulnerability, which could allow a physically proximate attacker to crash the affected system by causing a denial of service (DoS attack) or possibly execute arbitrary code. Other three are related to the ALSA subsystem, including a race condition. Read more

Samsung DeX will finally give life to the Linux smartphone

Remember when Canonical was doing everything they could to bring convergence between the Linux desktop and the Ubuntu Phone? They worked tirelessly to make it happen, only to fall short of that goal. This effort was preceded by Ubuntu Edge—a smartphone that, by itself, would bridge the mobile device and the desktop. That failed as well, but the intent was the same. For those that aren't familiar, the idea behind convergence is simple: Offer a single device that could serve as both a smartphone handset, and when connected to a monitor work as a standard desktop computer. The idea is quite brilliant and makes perfect sense. Especially when you remember how many people use a smartphone as their only means of either connecting to the world or productivity. With that number growing every year, the idea of convergence becomes even more important. Give them one device that could function in two very important ways. Read more Also: Samsung Galaxy S8 Icon Theme for KDE Plasma

today's howtos

PINE64 PINEBOOK Review — Is This $89 Linux Laptop Worth it?

A while back, there were articles circulating about the “World’s Cheapest Laptop,” but they really weren’t accurate. The PINEBOOK weighs in at $89USD for the 11″ model and $99USD for the 14″ model. But, can a sub-$100 laptop, new or used, really be worth it? It would almost be unanymously be argued not, but the PINEBOOK makes a very compelling case. Let’s tell you about it in detail. PINE64, the company behind the first budget/hobbyist 64bit single board computer by the same name, has started offering a lot more in the alternative computing arena. They have a wide variety of inventory on their website containing all sorts of odds and ends in addition to the flagship offerings. Everything a tinkerer might need, from microSD cards to USB wifi, USB ethernet, even power over ethernet broken-out into a DC barrel adapter and LCD panels, all for very appealing prices. Read more Also: Surface Book 2 can’t stay charged during gaming sessions