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Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Krusader - the alternative KDE file browser

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: KDE users have for a long time had the jack-of-all-trades, all-singing-all-dancing Konqueror for file management. If you yearn for a change of file manager now, however, and you’re a fan of the left-right split in your file manager, you might just like Krusader.

Digital Camera on Slackware

Filed under
HowTos

Tip o' the Day: I like my digicam quite a lot; its a Canon Powershot A630. It doesn’t have all the bells and whistles possible, but it’s a nice little piece that takes decent photos. I’m also a distro hopper, and as such reinstall my operating system every once in a while to try something new. If your distro doesn’t support PTP cameras out of the box, you’ll want to install this package.

Apt-Get It or For-get It

Filed under
Software

daveshields.wordpress: Here is all you need to know about package management on Linux. By package management I mean how you install, update, or remove a package: Apt-get it or for-get it!

Evolution 2.10.3 under PCLinuxOS 2007

Filed under
PCLOS
Software

Steve Carl (bmc blogs): If you are a Linux person, and you are living with MS created infrastructure, then one of the things you have to deal with is how to cross-calendar and email with the MS Windows users around you. And for MS Exchange, that is Evolution.

Take a Ride on Mandriva 2008 RC2 Express

Filed under
MDV

reviewlinux: On September 21 2007 Mandriva announced their release of Mandriva 2008 RC2. I think it was almost a 4 or 5 click process to get to the first install menu and thats why I say "Express" in my article title.

Coming soon: automatic Linux driver upgrades

Filed under
Software

linux-watch: Linux users want two things for their hardware: drivers; and easy access to those drivers. The first is finally happening; and now, thanks to a Dell Linux project called DKMS (Dynamic Kernel Module Support), the other is on its way.

Educating GNU/Linux users

Filed under
Linux

Bruce Byfield: My review of the latest release of Ubuntu was picked up by Slashdot this week, releasing a flood of criticism. Although the article praised Ubuntu, it was also one of the first to mention some of its shortcomings, so it probably provoked more reaction than the average review.

Kexec Hibernation Progress

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Ying Huang posted an updated version of his kexec based hiberation patches. Pavel Machek, one of the uswsusp maintainers, responsed favorably, suggesting, "seems like good enough for -mm to me."

Ubuntu Black Screen Recovery

Filed under
HowTos

lockergnome.com: Updating Ubuntu only to discover that the kernel update has brought you to a black screen - never fun. Once you manage to get back into your Ubuntu PC, you will be feeling a lot better. You have your important data backed up and of course, you can now take steps to put this other kernel out to pasture.

Today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Covert .rtf files on Linux

  • Penguin migration in Patagonia streamed for all to see
  • The Wrong Reason To Choose Open Source
  • Sparks Fly As Linux Kernel Guy Quits In A Huff (Alexander Wolfe)
  • TamilNadu Students get High end Lenovo and Dell laptops at 40% discount
  • One More Opera Snapshot
  • Bill Gates Is Still America's Richest Man
  • Creative Ways To Open Beer With Computer Hardware
  • Is the road to Moscow paved with good intentions?

Why use KDE?

Filed under
KDE

jucato.org: I just suddenly felt an urge to right about KDE after reading troy’s recent post (Troy, your marketing fever and ideas are contagious!!). I will probably be writing about something that has been written over and over again, but let me give it my own personal flavor. So…

Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn Under Parallels Desktop 3

Filed under
Ubuntu

gonz.wordpress: I’m currently posting this using Firefox 2.0.0.6 running in Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn Under Parallels Desktop 3 on my MacBook Pro 15-inch Intel Core Duo.

openSUSE 10.3 RC1 - Not quite there yet for me

Filed under
SUSE

blogbeebe: I downloaded three ISOs; the Gnome and KDE Live CDs, and the binary DVD. I burned all three and tested three machines with the two live CDs.

GIMP tricks: Snooker ball as a pseudo 3d object

Filed under
GIMP
HowTos

polishlinux: I don’t really remember when and where, but I have read once about that GIMP isn’t suitable to create pseudo 3D graphics. Nothing more fallible. I will try to show you that it’s wrong.

Extreme Tux Racer

Filed under
Gaming

freegamer: The team over at Extreme Tux Racer - the latest fork to take on the Tux Racer continuation mantle - have made their inaugral release. It's still a bedding-in period with no real major updates other than a new campaign (cup?) but hopefully it will signal the start of a new lease of life for development of a popular open source franchise.

Upgrade Ubuntu from Feisty to Gutsy

Filed under
HowTos

howtogeek: Ubuntu Gutsy is the next major release of the most popular Linux distro, due for release in October. Like all Linux distributions you can upgrade to the beta version anytime you want, as long as you don't mind encountering a few bumps in the road.

Expect a settlement in Monsoon GPL suit

Filed under
OSS
Legal

Dana Blankenhorn: I was sent a link to a Hava support thread on the issue, which was still online at this writing. The thread makes it clear that the facts of the case are on the side of GPL advocates, and that many people are checking the tools they get, looking for GPL violations.

KWin improvements

Filed under
KDE

Rivo's blog: One of the most interesting things is compositing settings autodetection. KWin now tries to detect your video driver and it's version and if it's good enough then compositing will be enabled by default.

Also: In praise of KDE Edu and Games

PC-BSD Day 17: Multimedia

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: Any desktop that wants to cater to the needs and wants of end users has to be multimedia enabled or at least be enabled as easy and quickly as possible. How is PC-BSD holding up in this regard?

OpenOffice.org Free Software Proves a Success at WalMart

Filed under
OOo

linux electrons: On July 18th 2007, Everex launched its first 'Back to School' PC with OpenOffice.org 2.02 into WalMart stores throughout the United States. The response was fantastic.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming