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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 17 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Discourse Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 11:11pm
Story EXT4 In Linux 3.18 Has Clean-ups, Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 11:10pm
Story Free and Open Source Electronic Signature in Costa Rica Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 10:55pm
Story Rejuvenate your Fedora desktop with Moka Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:57pm
Story Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst on the impact of cloud and mobile Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:50pm
Story LIBINPUT INTEGRATION IN KWIN/WAYLAND Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:31pm
Story V is for Vivid Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:27pm
Story Elive Is an Interesting Debian-Based Distro with a Beautiful Enlightenment Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:27pm
Story NVIDIA's NVPTX Support For GCC Is Close To Being Merged Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:22pm
Story The Future of the Internet - 20 Years Ago Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 8:18pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu - THE Linux Distribution

  • Mozilla Developer News for Aug 5
  • Could Linux Change Democracy?
  • Microsoft menaced by open source
  • GoblinX 2.7
  • IBM to open source supercomputing code
  • Would you buy a Microsoft-less desktop?
  • Interview: MarkMail Indexes KDE Mailinglist Archives
  • Book Review: Ubuntu for Non-Geeks
  • Kernel Log: New Stable kernel, DRI2 postponed, Xgl removed from X.org
  • Mozilla about:addons
  • Using Bash To Feed Command Output To A While Loop Without Using Pipes
  • Microsoft To Counter Open Source With 'Basic' Software Line

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • MLB.TV in Linux

  • Fedora on a stick
  • Learn more about a command when no man info page is available
  • Customize the Joe text editor
  • How to install OpenOffice.org extensions
  • A few terminal tips
  • Traffic Accounting with Linux IPTables
  • Hauppauge WinTV-HVR900 on Mandriva Linux 2008.1

Linux: the desktop years

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: IBM, Canonical, Red Hat and Novell have put out an interesting joint release about how they are to deliver Microsoft-free personal computing. In celebration of Linux’s imminent domination of the desktop market I thought it would be worth remembering how we got here:

Spotlight on FireFTP, an FTP client for Firefox

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: One of the things that makes Firefox so gosh-darn lovable is the ability to create and add third-party extensions to the browser. These can range from themes that customize the appearance, little boxes to update your Twitter, or even full-featured applications like music players or, say, FTP clients!

Linuxworld headlines

Filed under
Linux
  • LinuxWorld Conference & Expo Announces Finalists for Product Excellence Awards

  • LinuxWorld video: Merrill Lynch moves to stateless computing
  • LinuxWorld: For mobile operating systems, too much Linux?
  • LinuxWorld gets an open source voting tryout
  • LinuxWorld Day Two Gets Rolling
  • LinuxWorld keynotes: Now is the time to invest
  • LinuxWorld showing its true colors?

Ubuntu wins “Best Desktop Solution” at Linux World Expo 2008

Filed under
Ubuntu

fabianrodriguez.com: I just wanted to extended a huge “thank you!” to all of the Ubuntu community Smile Today Ubuntu won the “Best Desktop Solution” Product Excellence Award at LinuxWorld Conference and Expo 2008 in San Francisco, California for a second consecutive year.

New modules for GNOME 2.24

Filed under
Software

LWN: The GNOME release team has announced which new modules will be added for the 2.24 release. New stuff will include empathy, project hamster, and PolicyKit. The up-and-coming Conduit synchronization tool didn't quite make it, and neither did WebKit, though both seem likely for 2.26.

Intel's Larrabee GPU Will Support Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Intel's Larrabee will not launch for another year or two, but additional details were shared this week on this project that will launch Intel into the discrete graphics arena. We've known this already, but Larrabee will be a many-core graphics processor with an x86 instruction set designed to compete with the graphics cards from both ATI/AMD and NVIDIA.

Humor: A Better View of Microsoft Security

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

blog.linuxtoday: Ordinarily I don't pay any more attention to Microsoft than I have to, but this was too funny to ignore: A Better View of Microsoft Security?; Microsoft to expand its Trustworthy Computing in a bid to help users and vendors understand security risks.

WiFi software arrives on Linux desktops

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux.com: A vendor of Linux-based WiFi arrays is finally releasing a version of its WiFi Monitor utility for Linux desktops. The open source, widget-like Xirrus WiFi Monitor for Linux enables users to monitor, secure, and troubleshoot WiFi networks, says Xirrus.

Are Ubuntu Users Getting the Best of Both Worlds?

Filed under
Ubuntu

ostatic.com: For a community distribution, Ubuntu sure knows how to preen itself to look good for the business world. Canonical hasn't exactly kept its plans to get on IT managers' radar a secret, but the number of enterprise-ready applications for Ubuntu 8.04 LTS that are slowly becoming available in the Ubuntu Partner repository is getting hard to ignore.

High Noon with Smokin' Guns

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: Since the release of the Quake 3 engine source code in summer 2005 a lot of modifications and spin-offs have emerged. One such spin-off, Smokin' Guns (formerly known as Western Quake 3), is all about classical Wild West themes: big rifles and revolvers, wailing steel guitars, bank robberies, and smooth talking. It's a game you don't want to miss.

Reviewing Linux-next

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "I do think 'next' as it is has a few issues that either need to be fixed (unlikely - it's not the point of next) or just need to be aired as issues and understood," noted Linus Torvalds about the linus-next development tree, originally designed as a way to get subsystem maintainers more involved in managing merge conflicts.

IBM, Canonical/Ubuntu, Novell, Red Hat to Deliver Microsoft-Free Desktops Worldwide

Filed under
Linux

money.cnn.com: For the first time, IBM and leading Linux distributors Canonical/Ubuntu, Novell and Red Hat will join forces globally with their hardware partners to deliver Microsoft-free personal computing choices with Lotus Notes and Lotus Symphony in the one billion-unit desktop market worldwide by 2009.

Also: IBM targets Microsoft with desktop Linux initiative
And: IBM gets hip with 'cool' Ubuntu PC deal

Fedora 10 Alpha Preview

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Fedora 9 shipped earlier this year. Now, however, it's time start getting excited over Fedora 10. The first Alpha release of Fedora 10 (codenamed Cambridge) was released this morning. In this article we have screenshots of Fedora 10 along with some of the features you can expect when this Linux operating system ships in October.

5 Known Office Suites for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: A typical desktop computer user will almost always need an office suite. There are actually 5 known free and open source office suites that work best in Linux.

Lenovo launches a netbook

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Lenovo has announced its entry into the "netbook" market. The Linux-based IdeaPad S9 for "certain overseas markets," feature 8.9-inch display, plus 1.6GHz Intel Atom N270 processors, and up to 160GB of storage.

What to expect in Debian 5: Lenny

Filed under
Linux

practical-tech.com: Debian took a giant step forward recently towards releasing the next version of Debian, Lenny, by freezing the codebase. Now, the only major things standing between the next release of the popular Linux distribution are “fixes for release critical bugs” and “fixes for severity.”

Five Things Linus Torvalds Has Learned About Managing Software Projects

Filed under
Linux

cio.com: Linus Torvalds needs no introduction in operating systems or open-source circles. He's the creator, muse and chief developer of the Linux operating system. Torvalds started Linux while he was in college in 1991. Today, Linux is the foundation of multibillion-dollar companies including Oracle, Novell and Red Hat.

Bernard Out As Novell Global Channel Chief

Filed under
SUSE

crn.com: Tim Wolfe, president and general manager of Novell Americas, will serve as acting vice president of global channel sales effective immediately, replacing Pat Bernard who was just named to the position last November, the company said early Tuesday.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • MX Linux Review of MX-17 – For The Record
    MX Linux Review of MX-17. MX-17 is a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS Linux communities. It’s XFCE based, lightning fast, comes with both 32 and 64-bit CPU support…and the tools. Oh man, the tools available in this distro are both reminders of Mepis past and current tech found in modern distros.
  • Samsung Halts Android 8.0 Oreo Rollouts for Galaxy S8 Due to Unexpected Reboots
    Samsung stopped the distribution of the Android 8.0 Oreo operating system update for its Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones due to unexpected reboots reported by several users. SamMobile reported the other day that Samsung halted all Android 8.0 Oreo rollouts for its Galaxy S8/S8+ series of Android smartphones after approximately a week since the initial release. But only today Samsung published a statement to inform user why it stopped the rollouts, and the cause appears to be related to a limited number of cases of unexpected reboots after installing the update.
  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Kevin Tian
    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.
  • Initial Intel Icelake Support Lands In Mesa OpenGL Driver, Vulkan Support Started
    A few days back I reported on Intel Icelake patches for the i965 Mesa driver in bringing up the OpenGL support now that several kernel patch series have been published for enabling these "Gen 11" graphics within the Direct Rendering Manager driver. This Icelake support has been quick to materialize even with Cannonlake hardware not yet being available.
  • LunarG's Vulkan Layer Factory Aims To Make Writing Vulkan Layers Easier
    Introduced as part of LunarG's recent Vulkan SDK update is the VLF, the Vulkan Layer Factory. The Vulkan Layer Factory aims to creating Vulkan layers easier by taking care of a lot of the boilerplate code for dealing with the initialization, etc. This framework also provides for "interceptor objects" for overriding functions pre/post API calls for Vulkan entry points of interest.

Logstash 6.2.0 Released, Alfresco Grabbed by Private Equity Firm

  • Logstash 6.2.0 Release Improves Open Source Data Processing Pipeline
    The "L" in the ELK stack gets updated with new features including advanced security capabilities. Many modern enterprises have adopted the ELK (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana) stack to collect, process, search and visualize data. At the core of the ELK stack is the open-source Logstash project which defines itself as a server-side data processing pipeline - basically it helps to collect logs and then send them to a users' "stash" for searching, which in many cases is Elasticsearch.
  • Alfresco Software acquired by Private Equity Firm
    Enterprise apps company taken private in a deal that won't see a change in corporate direction. Alfresco has been developing its suite of Enterprise Content Management (ECM) and Business Process Management (BPM) technology since the company was founded back in June of 2005. On Feb. 8, Alfresco announced that it was being acquired by private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners (THL). Financial terms of the deal are not being publicly disclosed.

Servers and GPUs: Theano, DevOps, Kubernetes, AWS

  • Open Source Blockchain Computer Theano
    TigoCTM CEO Cindy Zimmerman says “we are excited to begin manufacturing our secure, private and open source desktops at our factory in the Panama Pacifico special economic zone. This is the first step towards a full line of secure, blockchain-powered hardware including desktops, servers, laptops, tablets, teller machines, and smartphones.” [...] Every component of each TigoCTM device is exhaustively researched and selected for its security profile based especially on open source hardware, firmware, and software. In addition, devices will run the GuldOS operating system, and open source applications like the Bitcoin, Ethereum and Dash blockchains. This fully auditable stack is ideal for use in enterprise signing environments such as banks and investment funds.
  • Enterprises identify 10 essential tools for DevOps [Ed: "Source code repository" and other old things co-opted to promote the stupid buzzword "devops"]
    Products branded with DevOps are everywhere, and the list of options grows every day, but the best DevOps tools are already well-known among enterprise IT pros.
  • The 4 Major Tenets of Kubernetes Security
    We look at security from the perspective of containers, Kubernetes deployment itself and network security. Such a holistic approach is needed to ensure that containers are deployed securely and that the attack surface is minimized. The best practices that arise from each of the above tenets apply to any Kubernetes deployment, whether you’re self-hosting a cluster or employing a managed service. We should note that there are related security controls outside of Kubernetes, such as the Secure Software Development Life Cycle (S-SDLC) or security monitoring, that can help reduce the likelihood of attacks and increase the defense posture. We strongly urge you to consider security across the entire application lifecycle rather than take a narrow focus on the deployment of containers with Kubernetes. However, for the sake of brevity, in this series, we will only cover security controls within the immediate Kubernetes environment.
  • GPUs on Google’s Kubernetes Engine are now available in open beta
    The Google Kubernetes Engine (previously known as the Google Container Engine and GKE) now allows all developers to attach Nvidia GPUs to their containers. GPUs on GKE (an acronym Google used to be quite fond of, but seems to be deemphasizing now) have been available in closed alpha for more than half a year. Now, however, this service is in beta and open to all developers who want to run machine learning applications or other workloads that could benefit from a GPU. As Google notes, the service offers access to both the Tesla P100 and K80 GPUs that are currently available on the Google Cloud Platform.
  • AWS lets users run SAP apps directly on SUSE Linux
  • SUSE collaborates with Amazon Web Services toaccelerate SAP migrations

Chrome and Firefox

  • The False Teeth of Chrome's Ad Filter.
    Today Google launched a new version of its Chrome browser with what they call an "ad filter"—which means that it sometimes blocks ads but is not an "ad blocker." EFF welcomes the elimination of the worst ad formats. But Google's approach here is a band-aid response to the crisis of trust in advertising that leaves massive user privacy issues unaddressed. Last year, a new industry organization, the Coalition for Better Ads, published user research investigating ad formats responsible for "bad ad experiences." The Coalition examined 55 ad formats, of which 12 were deemed unacceptable. These included various full page takeovers (prestitial, postitial, rollover), autoplay videos with sound, pop-ups of all types, and ad density of more than 35% on mobile. Google is supposed to check sites for the forbidden formats and give offenders 30 days to reform or have all their ads blocked in Chrome. Censured sites can purge the offending ads and request reexamination. [...] Some commentators have interpreted ad blocking as the "biggest boycott in history" against the abusive and intrusive nature of online advertising. Now the Coalition aims to slow the adoption of blockers by enacting minimal reforms. Pagefair, an adtech company that monitors adblocker use, estimates 600 million active users of blockers. Some see no ads at all, but most users of the two largest blockers, AdBlock and Adblock Plus, see ads "whitelisted" under the Acceptable Ads program. These companies leverage their position as gatekeepers to the user's eyeballs, obliging Google to buy back access to the "blocked" part of their user base through payments under Acceptable Ads. This is expensive (a German newspaper claims a figure as high as 25 million euros) and is viewed with disapproval by many advertisers and publishers.
  • Going Home
  • David Humphrey: Edge Cases
  • Experiments in productivity: the shared bug queue
    Over the next six months, Mozilla is planning to switch code review tools from mozreview/splinter to phabricator. Phabricator has more modern built-in tools like Herald that would have made setting up this shared queue a little easier, and that’s why I paused…briefly
  • Improving the web with small, composable tools
    Firefox Screenshots is the first Test Pilot experiment to graduate into Firefox, and it’s been surprisingly successful. You won’t see many people talking about it: it does what you expect, and it doesn’t cover new ground. Mozilla should do more of this.