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Wednesday, 07 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Why is Vista lame?

Filed under
Microsoft

Critical reception of Vista is cool, at best. Yet I know Microsoft didn’t set out to create a mediocre product. They have a lot of smart, passionate people who really want to create industry leading products. It is just that, on their flagship product, they haven’t.

My experience upgrading from Ubuntu 6.10 to Ubuntu 7.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

I’ve just completed my upgrade from Ubuntu’s Edgy Eft to Fiesty Fawn. I’m running this on a Lenovo x60s with an Intel Centrino Duo processor (1.66Ghz each), 1.5 GB of RAM and the Intel i915 chipset.

Unlike my last experience, this one went very, very smooth. In fact, there were no hiccups, glitches or bugs that I’ve found so far and I’ve tested all of my critical stuff.

Open-source group takes first interoperability steps

Filed under
OSS

Nonprofit consortium the Open Solutions Alliance (OSA) has begun making moves to increase businesses' use of open-source software.

The industry group Wednesday issued an interoperability roadmap and announced its first major project -- the Common Customer View prototype.

The Perfect Setup - Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Ubuntu 7.04)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Ubuntu 7.04) based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Courier POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

I will use the following software:

Web Server: Apache 2.2
Database Server: MySQL 5.0

GNOME Mobile and Embedded Initiative launched

Filed under
Software

The GNOME Foundation is scheduled to announce the GNOME Mobile and Embedded Initiative (GMAE) today at the Embedded Linux Conference in Santa Clara, Calif. The initiative is aimed at bolstering GNOME usage as an embedded and mobile development platform.

The Final Analysis of the Tux500 Scam

Filed under
Linux

Yayyy! Today is the Very Last Day that Penguin Pete has to talk about the tux500 scam! The story is almost completely told, and then I can forget it.

Nokia Internet Tablet : Sysadmins’ friend?

Filed under
Misc

A bane of the system administrator’s (SA) job is on-call work. You either end up lugging a laptop or making a dash for the nearest machine when things go wrong. . It would be nice to have something that was a bit more portable but had enough tools to fix most issues.

Feisty Released, Ubuntu Open Week and The Funky Feisty Competition…oh my!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Well, its out, thats right - Ubuntu 7.04, the Feistiest of Feisty Fawns is currently being slammed down the net into peoples computers. Go get your lovely Ubuntu goodness here.

Linux: ZFS, Licenses and Patents

Filed under
Linux

A recent discussion on the lkml examined the possibility of a Linux implementation of Sun's ZFS. It was pointed out that the file system is released under the GPL-incompatible CDDL, and that Sun has filed numerous patents to prevent ZFS from being reverse engineered.

Samsung latest to buy Linux patent protection from Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Samsung Electronics has followed in the footsteps of Novell and Fuji Xerox and signed a patent agreement with Microsoft which indemnifies the Korean electronics giant from any possible Linux patent infringement claims that Microsoft believes it could lodge.

People Behind KDE: Volker Krause

Filed under
KDE

For the next interview in the fortnightly People Behind KDE series we travel over to Germany to talk to the key to your personal information storage, a highly dedicated KDE-PIM developer (though hide any small animals when visiting his apartment!) - tonight's star of People Behind KDE is Volker Krause.

A SHORT INTRO

Age: 26
Located in: Aachen, Germany

Microsoft aims to double PC base

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft software will sell for just $3 (£1.50) in some parts of the world in an attempt to double the number of global PC users.

The firm wants to bring computing to a further one billion people by 2015.

Governments in developing countries can purchase the cut-price software, if they provide free PCs for schools.

Ubuntu launch marred by website woes

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Ubuntu's website has been flaking out on and off throughout today as its users attempt to download the latest free, open source desktop, laptop, client, and server Linux distribution.

Better Wi-Fi on the Linux Horizon

Filed under
Linux

Wireless networking on Linux is entering a new era. An era of bliss and ease; where users and network administrators have abundant time for relaxing lie-abouts on sunny warm hills because their wireless systems are humming along contentedly, instead of being vexing and unreliable.

Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn)

Filed under
Ubuntu

Although still not reflected on the main ubuntu.com site, which has suffered ~4 hours downtime this morning and is currently throttled, it appears Ubuntu 7.04 has become available for x86 and AMD 64 archs as well as in desktop and server flavors.

Installing CentOS 5 "Debian Style"

Filed under
HowTos

If one knows of the hype about Ubuntu, and it is almost unavoidable, one is led to believe that it is the most popular Linux distribution for desktop users. I have yet to see hard data that shows evidence of that claim so that will remain unresolved for now. One of the reasons touted for Ubuntu's popularity is that it comes on a single CD.

Get things done with ThinkingRock

Filed under
Software

The Getting Things Done (GTD) method of time management is one of the simplest methods I've found, but until recently I hadn't had much luck in finding any Linux-compatible applications to help me stick to using GTD. A few weeks ago I stumbled on ThinkingRock, a Java-based app for following the GTD methodology, and tried it out. I've been pleased with its simplicity and ease of use.

Arch Linux

Filed under
Linux

My friend pushed me into using Arch Linux some time ago, and it’s pretty awesome. It’s a binary distribution, which is nice because I don’t really fancy compiling everything myself.

There are three things about Arch that I love, that is the distribution being quite minimized - it’s smaller than the other Big Ones (Debian, et al.) but probably somewhat larger than Slackware.

OLPC XO Theft: Vandalizing Education

Filed under
OLPC

Why should we be concerned about the XO and crime? Probably because the extent and pervasiveness of crime in the developing world is something not always understood from outside.

Ensuring the Success of Dell Desktop Linux

Filed under
Linux

I’m watching the progress that Dell is making with their second desktop Linux effort and am increasingly wondering how long before the Linux supporters make it clear to Dell this is a bad idea.

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More in Tux Machines

Getting started with Raspberry Pi

So you have a Raspberry Pi, or you’re thinking of getting one, and you want to know how to get started and how to become a master user of one. The Raspberry Pi is a single board computer, meaning that in many ways it's a regular PC, except that everything that makes up the computer is on a single board rather than a traditional PC, which has a motherboard and requires a number of additional daughterboards to make a whole unit. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun Hardcore Tactical Stealth Game Out on Linux
    More and more AAA games are coming to our beloved Linux platform, and nothing makes us happier than to see Daedalic Entertainment's Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun title launching today on Steam for Linux, Mac, and Windows. If you're not familiar with Daedalic Entertainment's work, they are the creators of the superb and fun Deponia series, but Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun is something different, a tactical stealth-strategy game in the style of the Commandos stealth-oriented real-time tactics video game series.
  • Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun, the top-down stealth game is now out
    Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun [GOG, Steam, Official Site] is the rather good top-down stealth game from Mimimi Productions. It's now out way a day-1 Linux release and it has a demo. I played the demo and I was massively impressed, so impressed that I would very much like to cover the game properly. So I will be reaching out to the developer for a key.
  • The Keeper, a promising looking side-scrolling survival action game with plenty of action is coming to Linux
    The Keeper side-scrolling survival action game full of boss battles, a combo system for combat and a day and night cycle will come to Linux.
  • Editorial: A chat about asking developers for a Linux port
    It has come to my attention recently that some people have been taking a really hard stance against developers who want to gauge interest for a Linux port. I want to talk about it for a bit. [...] Be the Linux community I know and love, be helpful to developers, get in on beta testing when you can (I’ve seen plenty of developers give out free keys for this too!) and appreciate the good games we get. We are a smaller market in most people’s eyes, so let’s not turn away anything that could help us grow even a little. The fact is, I’ve seen multiple games only come to Linux because Linux fans showed actual interest in it. One such example is Nightside, which I discovered on Steam. After a quick chat with the developer, I was able to convince them to do a Linux build and after a short test they then decided to do support a Linux build. There’s many such examples like this, but due to the amount of games I cover that’s one I could quickly pull up (without having to sift through hundreds of articles).
  • Dawn of War II has a minor patch to fix a few issues
  • Khronos are working on an open standard for VR, Valve will use it
  • BOOR, a new puzzle platformer will arrive with Linux support next year
    BOOR [Official Site] is a new puzzle platformer from developer Dazlog Studio and publisher BadLand Games that will have Linux support. We have many puzzle platformers now, so I do hope BOOR has something to set itself apart from the rest of them. I haven't seen anything in the trailer or the feature list that really jumps out at me. I am hoping when they reveal more gameplay it will look more enticing.
  • The developers of 'EVERSPACE' are still working on the Linux version, seeking help from Epic Games
    EVERSPACE [Steam, Official Site] is the fantastic looking UE4 space shooter that's being ported to Linux, but the developers have encountered a problem with lighting bugs. I follow the topic on Steam, but a user also emailed this in to ask me to highlight it. I would have anyway since I'm interested in it.
  • Total War: WARHAMMER - Realm of The Wood Elves DLC will come to Linux soon
    Total War: WARHAMMER - Realm of The Wood Elves [Steam] is the next DLC that introduces an exciting race into this strategy game. Feral have confirmed it will be on Linux soon with the quick tweet they sent out.
  • DoomRL or 'DRL' as it's now called has gone open source
    After ZeniMax sent the lawyers knocking, the developer of what was called DoomRL (Doom Roguelike) has changed it's name to 'DRL' [Github, Official Site] and it's now open source. ZeniMax are well within their rights to "protect" the Doom brand, but I still think their lawyers are idiotic for doing this. It's not like small-time roguelike was actually competing with the real Doom.

High School's Help Desk Teaches Open Source IT Skills

The following is an adapted excerpt from chapter six of The Open Schoolhouse: Building a Technology Program to Transform Learning and Empower Students, a new book written by Charlie Reisinger, Technology Director for Penn Manor School District in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. In the book, Reisinger recounts more than 16 years of Linux and open source education success stories. Penn Manor schools saved over a million dollars by trading proprietary software for open source counterparts with its student laptop program. The budget is only part of the story. As Linux moved out of the server room and onto thousands of student laptops, a new learning community emerged. Read more

What’s New with Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8?

I’m pleased to announce the release of the Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8. As always, we focused on improving code quality, security hardening as well as enabling new features. One area of interest and particular focus is new feature support for ARM servers. Over the last few months, we’ve seen a surge of patches from various ARM vendors that have collaborated on a wide range of updates from new drivers to architecture to security. Read more