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Saturday, 25 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Virgin America migrates to Red Hat Linux

Filed under
Linux

computerweekly: The website has selected Red Hat Enterprise Linux as the platform to support the website, after previously using the less scalable Red Hat-sponsored Fedora open-source solution.

Also: Linux security holes identified

Two tools for enabling wireless cards

Filed under
Software

linux.com: No other hardware nowadays supports GNU/Linux as weakly as wireless network adapters. Between the constant release of new models and major vendors who are uninterested in supporting the operating system, free drivers for wireless cards are next to impossible to reverse engineer. Nor can you find many retailers willing to customize laptops as readily as they do workstations. In this situation, ndiswrapper and the Broadcom firmware cutter provide a functional, if not always satisfactory, solution.

Ubuntu 7.04 (feisty) on a Thinkpad T61P

Filed under
Ubuntu

Michael R Head: Finally got Ubuntu running on the T61P (which has assumed the name of my last laptop which is in the process of having the contents of its hard drive transplanted). I encountered some issues in the process of doing this.

Could Linux become the dominant OS?

Filed under
Linux

the register: The trends suggest that Linux will become the dominant OS - the commodity OS - both for the PC and the server, to the eventual detriment of Microsoft's revenues.

Linux text editors: Do any make the grade?

Filed under
Software

computerworld: Linux buffs tend to scoff at one of the major reasons that Windows users like me haven't switched yet: We don't want to give up our favorite applications. With countless open-source options, plus a rising number of commercial apps for Linux, their argument goes, we can certainly find a replacement for whatever software we're running on XP or Vista. But, Linux fans, it's not so simple.

Bruce Perens Declines 60 Minutes Interview

Filed under
Reiser

technocrat.net: 60 Minutes called yesterday regarding the Hans Reiser story - Reiser is a brilliant filesystem developer and is about to go to trial.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How can I make dd give me a progress report?

  • Linux Testers Wanted for EVE Online
  • Red Hat in talks with states for open source solution
  • Is Open-Source A Business Model? $500 Million Says It Is
  • An Interview with Matt Asay
  • MIT’s ‘$100 laptops’ to go to Pacific islands
  • Xandros dance with Microsoft turns to a smooch
  • What made Kevin’s jaw hit the floor today?

Minty Dell(icious)

Filed under
Linux

Steve Carl (bmc blogs): Success with one Dell leads to trying another. The "old" Dell also runs Linux like it was made for it. Oh. Wait. Linux is made for almost everything.

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 updated

Filed under
Linux

debian.net: The Debian project has updated the stable distribution Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (codename Etch). This update adds security updates to the stable release, together with a few corrections to serious problems.

Manage your photos with digiKam

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftware mag: It’s been said that for a free software desktop to succeed it needs to address the needs of the average home user. Managing digital photographs is just one of those needs. Let’s see how one of the more popular free software photo management applications, digiKam, measures up.

KDE 4: cursor themes, LinuxMCE, some impressions

Filed under
KDE

liquidat: Current KDE 4 SVN has an improvement that makes it possible to change the cursor theme without re-starting X. Also, the LinuxMCE team now officially cooperates with KDE to merge technology where it makes sense. I also took some general KDE 4 screenshots to gather some impressions.

Also: Raptor Menu flip Effect

Linux: Moving 4K Stacks Forward

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In a series of 5 patches, Jesper Juhl propsed moving 4K stacks from a debug feature to a non-debug feature, defaulting it to be enabled in the -mm tree.

Information sharing at the NSA (video)

Filed under
Misc

linux.com: The topic of information sharing among US intelligence agencies, the FBI, and other federal agencies has attracted attention since 9/11. At Defcon XV, I had the opportunity to ask Tony Sager, chief of the National Security Agency's Vulnerability Analysis and Operations Group, about information sharing within the agency.

Linux Mint Takes on a KDE Flavor

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Linux Mint, a community Linux distribution that includes some proprietary elements for a better "out of the box" user experience, is now available in an edition with KDE as its desktop environment.

Razer DeathAdder Linux Program

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: As was pointed out in the Phoronix Forums, there is now an open-source utility to configure your Razer DeathAdder mouse under Linux.

Debian Turns 14 Today

Filed under
Linux

Tom-buntu: Debian, the Linux distribution that Ubuntu is based on, is 14 years old today. Incredible!

OpenOffice.org developer talks about plans for OOXML support

Filed under
OSS

arstechnica: Michael Brauer, the OpenOffice.org XML project lead and OASIS OpenDocument Technical Committee Chair, has written a blog entry about the progress of native Office Open XML (OOXML) import filter development for OpenOffice.org. Brauer explains the importance of supporting OOXML in OpenOffice.org and also describes some of the challenges associated with supporting an emerging document format.

People of openSUSE: Martin Schlander

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

opensuse news: Here is the interview with Martin Schlander, also known as ‘cb400f’, from Denmark. He is the coordinator for Danish translations.

How to install Ubuntu Linux on the decTOP SFF computer

Filed under
HowTos

librenix.com: I recently bought a decTOP small form factor (SFF) computer. My goal was to build a cheap, fanless, quiet, and low power consumption Linux server. This article details the steps I used to build the USB boot/installation drive and install Ubuntu 6.06 on the decTOP.

Book Review: The Official Ubuntu Book

Filed under
Reviews

techbookreport: It should be no surprise that Ubuntu has so quickly established itself as one of the leading Linux distributions. Now, for those looking for a book to help them on the way, the Official Ubuntu Book is out in a new edition to match the 7.04 release of the software.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Puppet Wins Best DevOps Tool for Open Source at the 2017 DevOps Excellence Awards
  • The goal of HP's radical The Machine: Reshaping computing around memory
    Not every computer owner would be as pleased as Andrew Wheeler that their new machine could run "all weekend" without crashing. But not everyone's machine is "The Machine," an attempt to redefine a relationship between memory and processor that has held since the earliest days of parallel computing. Wheeler is a vice president and deputy labs director at Hewlett Packard Enterprise. He's at the Cebit trade show in Hanover, Germany, to tell people about The Machine, a key part of which is on display in HPE's booth. [...] HPE has tweaked the Linux operating system and other software to take advantage of The Machine's unusual architecture, and released its changes under open source licenses, making it possible for others to simulate the performance of their applications in the new memory fabric.
  • Eudyptula Challenge Status report
    Welcome to another very semi-irregular update from the Eudyptula Challenge.
  • Eudyptula Challenge Status report
    The Eudyptula Challenge is a series of programming exercises for the Linux kernel. It starts from a very basic "Hello world" kernel module, moves up in complexity to getting patches accepted into the main kernel. The challenge will be closed to new participants in a few months, when 20,000 people have signed up.
  • Daimler Jumps on Linux Bandwagon
    Not long ago, if a major corporation were to take out membership in an open source project, that would be big news -- doubly so for a company whose primary business isn't tech related. Times have changed. These days the corporate world's involvement in open source is taken for granted, even for companies whose business isn't computer related. Actually, there's really no such thing anymore. One way or another, computer technology is at the core of nearly every product on the market. So it wasn't surprising that hardly anyone noticed earlier this month when Daimler AG, maker of Mercedes-Benz and the world's largest manufacturer of commercial vehicles, announced it had joined the Open Invention Network (OIN), an organization that seeks to protect open source projects from patent litigation. According to a quick and unscientific search of Google, only one tech site covered the news, and that didn't come until a full 10 days after the announcement was made.
  • ONAP: Raising the Standard for NFV/SDN Telecom Networks [Ed: Amdocs pays the Linux Foundation for editorial control and puff pieces]
    This article is paid for by Amdocs...
  • Plamo 6.2 リリース
    Plamo 6.2 をリリースしました。
  • Dominique Leuenberger: [Tumbleweed] Review of the week 2017/12
    What a week! Tumbleweed once again is the first (to my knowledge) to ship the just released GNOME 3.24.0 as part of its main repository. Being shipped to the users in less than 48 hours since the official release announcement is something we can only do thanks to all the automatic building and testing AND the efforts put into the packages! If packagers would not be at the ball the whole time, this would not be possible. Even though the week has seen ‘only’ 4 snapshots (0317, 0318, 0320 and 0322) the changes delivered to the user base is enormous.
  • VMware Workstation 12.x.x for latest openSUSE Tumbleweed
  • Zero Terminal Mini Linux Laptop Created Using Raspberry Pi Zero W And Smartphone Keyboard
  • Zero Terminal: A DIY handheld Linux PC made from a Raspberry Pi and a cheap iPhone keyboard accessory

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • Flowblade Video Editor 1.12 Released, Adds 2 New Tools
    A shiny new version of open-source video editor Flowblade is available for download. Flowblade 1.12 introduces a pair of new tools. Progress has also been made towards creating a distribution agnostic .AppImage, though, alas, there are still kinks to be ironed out so you won’t find an app image of the current release.
  • Vivaldi 1.8 Web Browser Launch Imminent As First Release Candidate Is Out
    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard announced today, March 24, 2017, the release and immediate availability of the first Release Candidate of the forthcoming Vivaldi 1.8 web browser for all supported platforms. Dubbed as Vivaldi Snapshot 1.8.770.44, the Release Candidate of Vivaldi 1.8 is here to fix some last-minute bugs for the new History feature, which is the star of the new upcoming web browser release based on the latest Chromium 57 open-source project, as well as to improve the user interface zoom functionality.
  • Epiphany 3.24 Web Browser Has New Bookmarks UI, Improves Tracking Protection
    GNOME 3.24 arrived a couple of days ago, and it's the biggest release of the popular desktop environment so far, shipping with lots of new features and improvements across all of its applications and components. During its 6-month development cycle, we managed to cover all the major features implemented in the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, but also the various improvements included in many of the apps that are usually distributed under the GNOME Stack umbrella.
  • Firefox Sync Support Is Coming to GNOME Web
    GNOME Web (aka the browser formerly known as Epiphany) is working to add Firefox Sync support, letting users keep bookmarks, history and open-tabs in sync across devices.

Games and CrossOver