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Tuesday, 25 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 524 srlinuxx 09/09/2013 - 1:08pm
Story few more odds & ends: srlinuxx 08/09/2013 - 2:49am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 07/09/2013 - 3:17pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 06/09/2013 - 9:46pm
Blog entry Sometimes the Tech pres just gets it wrong.. fieldyweb 06/09/2013 - 7:44pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 06/09/2013 - 6:50pm
Story Rhythmbox 3.0 Has Been Officially Released srlinuxx 06/09/2013 - 4:55pm
Story @ phoronix today: srlinuxx 06/09/2013 - 4:53am
Story Linux vs. Bullshit srlinuxx 06/09/2013 - 1:35am
Story Manjaro Past, Present and Future: A Virtual Roundtable srlinuxx 06/09/2013 - 1:28am

Hoist your applications with petardfs

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The petard filesystem is designed to produce only errors -- but you can stipulate what conditions generate the errors and what those errors should be. That makes petardfs useful for system and unit testing -- for example, making sure that an application gives a sane error message if it fails to open a file, or if there is a read error at byte 5000 of a file.

7 Reasons Why Linux Won't Succeed On The Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Alexander Wolfe: The open-source operating system is destined to stay stuck in the shadow of Windows, blogger Alex Wolfe opines. Read why he believes desktop Linux hasn't--and isn't--going to have any significant impact.

Hidden Linux : Filelight

Filed under
Software

Tux Love: The easiest way to check on disk space usage in Linux is to do a df -h command in a console window. Unfortunately it doesn't tell you where all the space has gone. Sheesh, what a mess! Thank heavens then for Filelight.

A first run with IBM's free office suite

Filed under
Software

Computer giant IBM yesterday released a free office suite for Windows and Linux machines called Lotus Symphony. Symphony is available from the Symphony website which requires users to register and be logged on to download the software. Symphony is available for both Linux and Windows.

Ignorance (of open source), thy name is Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Matt Asay: Oh, my. We're back to the good old days of Microsoft mythology. I had actually believed that Microsoft had grown up and wised up. But no.

How To Compile rTorrent From SVN In Ubuntu Feisty Fawn / Gutsy

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Torrent is a great way to transfer large files very quickly. However most torrent clients are gui based and have quite some impact on system resources (e.g. Azureus). rTorrent is a lightweight client running from the terminal.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Firefox 2.0.0.7 Officially Released

  • A Free Software Week quandary
  • What will KDE 4.0 be?
  • Linux: Copy on Write Credentials
  • Linux: RAS Infrastructure
  • 10th Issue of the Amarok Newsletter is Out
  • Broadcom Joins the LiMo Foundation
  • Removing orphan packages with Pacman
  • Autostart Apps in PCLinuxOS 2007 (KDE)
  • Microsoft's Mobile PC Newsletter Features Linux-enabled Nokia N800
  • World of Padman on Linux Live DVD
  • Apache lead over Microsoft IIS shrinks again

Linux And Hand-Me-Down Computing

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: My father recently retired a 1-Ghz AMD (AMD) computer with 1 Gbyte of RAM that he'd built from mail-ordered parts. My first move: Wipe it clean, install Linux, and prepare it for an exercise in "hand-me-down computing."

Got game, with linux?

Filed under
Linux

blog.spocore.com: A long time ago, back when i was still a common windows user, i was very serious in online gaming. In particularly a game called Star Wars Jedi Academy. Now I have long since switched to linux, which of course will not run the game natively.

An Idiot’s Tale of Choosing a Linux Distro

Filed under
Linux

pcmechanic: I started using Windows back with Windows 3.1. I went through 95, 98, served a brief prison sentence with Windows ME, moved to 2000, then XP, and now Vista. So, I’ve pretty much used them all. The problem is that I am not much of a Linux guy. I was confused by all the myriad of distros out there. There are just TONS of them. How the hell am I supposed to choose a Linux distro?

NVIDIA 100.14.19 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: After a very slow summer, NVIDIA has finally rolled out an updated Linux proprietary display driver. The release highlights are quite extensive. For those using Compiz, Beryl, or Compiz Fusion will be pleased to know that there is improved GLX_EXT_texture_from_pixmap out-of-memory handling.

Flock 1.0 Coming Fall 2007

Filed under
Software

cybernet: When Flock 0.9 launched it was a pretty big overhaul, and now their next big milestone is Flock 1.0 which currently has a vague release date of Fall 2007. Honestly this is the dream browser.

Also: Flock: Social Network Aggregator?

All Macedonian students to use Linux desktops

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: The One Laptop per Child's XO, better known as the $100 laptop, gets most of the headlines but NComputing is showing in Macedonia, with its Ubuntu Linux based servers and virtual PC terminals, that there's more than one way to get inexpensive Linux desktops into students' hands.

IBM Symphony falls on deaf ears without open source e-mail, calendar

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: IBM’s debut of its homegrown open source version of OpenOffice without e-mail or collaboration features is not surprising but nevertheless disappointing.

Windows Guy Takes Ubuntu Gutsy To Work….

Filed under
Ubuntu

scitech.teambio.org: I’ve been experimenting with Ubuntu (Feisty) for about the last two months. In previous posts, I’ve written how pleased I was. Here are my honest observations about my day with Ubuntu at work.

Just peachy: free software, free movies

Filed under
Movies
OSS

freesoftware mag: Apparently I’ve been living under a rock, because I only recently found out about the Blender project’s free and open source short movie, Elephants Dream.

Mandriva signs FOSS deal with Angola

Filed under
MDV

tectonic: Mandriva Linux today announced a deal with the National Commission for Information Technology (CNTI) in Angola to provide technology solutions, training and consulting services in the African country.

Google Summer of Code continues its record of success

Filed under
Google
OSS

linux.com: A musical notation system for KOffice, a cross-platform kiosk browser, a help system editor for GNOME -- these are just a few of the projects completed in this year's Google Summer of Code (SOC) event, during which Google paid students to work on free and open source software projects. The innovations in this third year appear to have enriched the experience for participants, but not affected the project completion rate.

Buddi: A simple way to track personal finances

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Although the idea of using an application to manage your personal finances makes a lot of sense, not all of us have the time and patience to learn all the intricacies of tools like GnuCash or Money Manager Ex. If that sounds like you, try Buddi, probably the easiest to use personal finance manager out there.

Kwallet - remembering passwords the KDE way

Filed under
KDE

FOSSwire: Jacob took a look at standalone GTK-based password remembering tool GPass recently, and if you’re not on KDE that is a very useful tool. KDE users however have a built in architecture called KWallet.

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More in Tux Machines

AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 OpenCL vs. NVIDIA Shows Problems

Last week I began posting a number of AMD Radeon RX 580 Linux benchmarks but not covered so far has been the OpenCL compute performance considering the Clover-based compute stack isn't good enough for benchmarking and is basically unmaintained these days by AMD. Meanwhile, their ROCm stack is still being brought up and is not yet fully-opened nor optimized yet for performance. Thus for those with desktop cards looking for basic OpenCL support are left with the AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver with its closed-source OpenCL driver. In this article are some fresh OpenCL benchmarks of AMDGPU-PRO on the RX 580 and other Radeon GPUs compared to NVIDIA with its Linux OpenCL driver. Read more

Dark times for OmniOS – an Oracle-free open-source Solaris project

Development of OmniOS – an Oracle-free open-source variant of Solaris – is being killed after five years of work. Active development of OmniOS by OmniTI is being suspended, we're told, with its current beta being the final release. OmniOS is a distribution of Illumos, which is derived from OpenSolaris, Sun's open-source flavor of Solaris. Read more

Ubuntu Phone security updates end in June, app store closing

When Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical (the company behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution), announced his company would not only be abandoning their custom desktop environment (Unity), but also halting development on their phone/tablet operating system, many questions were left unanswered. One of those questions: What happens to the existing phones and tablets running Ubuntu Touch that have already been sold? Read more

today's leftovers

  • OpenRA C&C Reimplementation Gets New Stable Release, Here Is What's New
    Oliver Brakmann from the OpenRA project, an open-source and cross-platform initiative to offer a reimplementation of the popular Command & Conquer games, announced the availability of a new stable release.
  • Pisi-Linux-2.0-Beta-KDE5
  • Arch-Based arkOS Linux Being Discontinued
    arkOS, the Arch-based Linux distribution focused on "securely self-hosting your online life" with aims to make it easy to deploy servers for web-based services, is being discontinued. ArkOS since 2012 had been working to make it trivial to deploy your own Linux web server, your own personal cloud (ownCloud), and making it easy for other services to be deployed while being done so securely and easily. You probably haven't heard of arkOS making the news in a while and sadly now it's making news again, but only because it's being discontinued by its lead developer.
  • SUSE Hack Week 15
    Back in February the fifteenth SUSE Hack Week took place. As always this was a week of free hacking, to learn, to innovate, to collaborate, and to have a lot of fun. I didn't have the full time, so I worked on a couple of small things and a few projects I maintain. I did want to summarize that, so here you go.
  • How To Use SD Card As Internal Storage On Android | Adoptable Storage On Android
  • Anbox - Android in a Box
  • Your CEO’s Obliviousness about Open Source is Endangering Your Business [Ed: Jeff Luszcz says nothing about the risk of proprietary components with back doors etc. and instead 'pulls a Black Duck']
    But what caused these issues? Itis what happens when an open source component is integrated into a commercial software product and violates its open source license, or when it contains a vulnerability that was previously unknown. As technology evolves, open source security and compliance risk are reaching a critical apex that if not addressed, will threaten the entire software supply chain.
  • Mentor tips Azure IoT support and Linux-driven self-driving tech [Ed: Azure is a patent trap with back doors]
    Mentor announced Azure Certified for IoT compliance for Mentor Embedded Linux, and unveiled a Linux-based “DRS360” self-driving car platform.