Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox Full Screen srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:51pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 5:21am
Story Two new projects can help free software replace Skype srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 5:20am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 5:08am
Story Fight “lawful access” with Liberté Linux srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 5:03am
Story Inside Murdoch's $5m Linux supercomputer srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:59am
Blog entry weirdness: puppy & wd-40 srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:07am
Story Open Source for Vertical Apps: srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:43am
Story screenshots of Desura srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:40am
Story phoronix: nvidia, xorg, ext4, cpuidle srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:38am

In Memory of Dr. Carl Sagan

Filed under
Misc

On December 20th, 2006 it will be 10 years since Carl Sagan passed away. He is remembered for many things, however what I’ll remember most about him was his pure love of spreading a love for science.

Beginners Guide to Linux Desktops

Filed under
Software

So you use Linux, but have you ever used a different desktop environment than the default? Surprisingly, there are too many to even count, but we are taking a look at a few of the most popular and explain advantages of each one.

Microsoft will drive Linux desktop adoption in 2007

Filed under
Linux

As part of a list of predictions for 2007, research firm IDC said Microsoft's client operating system anti-piracy efforts will backfire in 2007. Instead of stamping out software piracy, the campaign will drive customers toward a Linux desktop, said the Framingham, Mass.-based research firm.

Ryzom: a free MMORPG?

Filed under
Gaming

MMORPGs, or Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games, are fairly popular in the proprietary gaming world. Rather than playing a game all by yourself on a computer in your own dark room, you could be playing a game all by yourself on a computer in your own dark room---but against thousands of other people who play the same game on-line along with, or against, your character in the game, adding an intriguing social edge to the genre. Unfortunately, no such game currently exists in the free software world. Not yet, anyway.

Choosing Vendors: The Linux vs. Microsoft Red Herring

Filed under
OS

One of the difficulties is that there is so much bad blood between the groups that I often wonder if I’m writing about Israel and Palestine rather than technologies. There are lines that can be crossed that make it incredibly difficult to reach common ground because people just don’t forget some things that are said in anger.

GoboLinux : breath of fresh air?

Filed under
Linux

My very first reaction to GoboLinux was negative. The underlying idea of taming the Unix/Linux file system hierarchy with symbolic links isn't new: heck, SCO did that way back with their 3.2v4.0 release, and for exactly the same reasons. But.. you know, the more I read about GoboLinux, the less certain I became that this is a foolish Don Quixote effort.

Download of the day: Firefox 2.0.0.1 - Final Release Version

Filed under
Moz/FF

Yup, new build is out and you grab latest version from ftp server. Bugs fixed so far for Firefox 2.0.0.1: 83 in total; 42 crashers, 3 memory leaks, 41 regressions, and 4 privacy-related bugs.

2006: The year that changed Linux

Filed under
Linux

I've been saying for years that Linux was well along on its way from being the tech fanboy operating system of choice, to becoming one of big business' favorite operating systems. Well, I was right all along, but in 2006, that progress smacked many Linux fans in the face.

Weekly Debian Nubiles #6

Filed under
Linux
Humor

Did you ever get the feeling that maybe all of the adults have left the Debian project for greener pastures (ie Ubuntu)? When you read about developers deliberately sabotaging the release of Etch do you just think "Oh well, another candidate for the famous Linux Hissy-Fit Award" or do you possibly begin to wonder if this points to a deeper, darker, drearier and - notwithstanding my amazing powers of alliteration - way way dastardlier plot.

A survey of Linux file managers

Filed under
Software

Linux file manager ontogeny encapsulates the history of GNU/Linux. File managers began as command-line and generic graphical tools and progressed to desktop-specific ones, gaining sophistication along the way, with mouse controls, for example, replacing buttons. Today, the more than a dozen options highlighted here will suit users with widely varied interests.

Glipper will make GNOME much more usable

Filed under
Software

One key feature GNOME has lacked, in comparison to KDE, is a clipboard manager like KDE's Klipper. That's now about to change, thanks to the efforts of a project called "Glipper."

Howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Linux play encrypted DVDs

  • Recover Data from a Damaged hard disk using dd_rhelp
  • Ubuntu Quicktip - adding extra fonts to your Ubuntu install
  • Open Source Monitoring 101- A Refresher
  • Mount your widows Partitions and make it read and writable
  • Alternate Desktop Manager - Xfce / Fluxbox / Enlightenment / Blackbox / Openbox / Afterstep / FVWM / WindowMaker
  • beryl + ubuntu edgy on dell latitude d600

Naming Apache Geronimo JNDI and connection pools for Java resource, Part 2

Filed under
News

This article, the second installment in this series, shows you how Apache Geronimo, JNDI, and Java Message Service (JMS) resource groups interrelate. Plus you'll learn how to build a JMS resource connection and access it in a simple Geronimo application using JNDI.

Neuros OSD Review

Filed under
Hardware

The Neuros OSD promises a lot - it claims to be the first open source Linux-based embedded media center and it "records video and links your PC, portables and entertainment center". Bold claims, but can it live up to them? Linuxlookup.com has a two page review of the Neuros OSD from both a developer and user perspective.

Setting Up A PXE Install Server For Multiple Linux Distributions With Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a PXE (short for preboot execution environment) install server with Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft). A PXE install server allows your client computers to boot and install a Linux distribution over the network, without the need of burning Linux iso images onto a CD/DVD, boot floppy images, etc. This is handy if your client computers do not have CD or floppy drives, or if you want to set up multiple computers at the same time (e.g. in a large enterprise), or simply because you want to save the money for the CDs/DVDs. In this article I show how to configure a PXE server that allows you to boot multiple distributions: Ubuntu Edgy/Dapper, Debian Etch/Sarge, Fedora Core 6, CentOS 4.4, OpenSuSE 10.2, and Mandriva 2007.

Is KDE 4 The Desktop Answer?

Filed under
KDE

I just read an article about this in ComputerWorld Australia. The article is an interview and talks about some of what will be new in KDE 4. Having used KDE for close to 10 years now, I am clearly a fan but I am not sure KDE 2, 3, 4 or 27 is the answer.

Disgruntled Debian developers delay Etch

Filed under
Linux

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0, codenamed Etch, had been due to arrive by December 4, 2006, but it's been delayed because some developers have deliberately slowed down their work.

Some Howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install and use SSH Server on Ubuntu 6.10

  • Local DNS Cache for Faster Browsing on Ubuntu
  • How to Backup Kontact

Learn 10 good UNIX usage habits

Filed under
Linux

Adopt 10 good habits that improve your UNIX command line efficiency - and break away from bad usage patterns in the process. This article takes you step-by-step through several good, but too often neglected, techniques for command-line operations. Learn about common errors and how to overcome them, so you can learn exactly why these UNIX habits are worth picking up.

Is Linux Ready for Small Biz?

Filed under
Linux

Many small businesses have avoided Linux for a variety of reasons: not enough applications, complexity of installation or that it requires too much technical know-how to run. The technology has matured over many years, which raises the question: how valid are these considerations today?

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box