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Friday, 24 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 13/01/2013 - 7:47pm
Story Bodhi Linux 2.2.0 Review srlinuxx 12/01/2013 - 7:51pm
Story Ask Ubuntu Gets Facelift srlinuxx 12/01/2013 - 7:48pm
Story CompuLab Intense PC Pro Review – The Mini PC of your dreams srlinuxx 12/01/2013 - 7:35pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 12/01/2013 - 12:07am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 11/01/2013 - 7:25pm
Story The Incessant Language Propaganda Horse Race srlinuxx 11/01/2013 - 1:39am
Story Gentoo: A Linux Distribution Where You Compile Your Own srlinuxx 11/01/2013 - 1:37am
Story 5 Must Have Utility Apps For Ubuntu srlinuxx 10/01/2013 - 9:48pm
Story Preview: Elementary OS 2 "Luna" Beta 1 srlinuxx 10/01/2013 - 8:58pm

Application-wise network filtering on Linux?

Filed under
Software

liquidat: Recently I was asked if Linux supports application-wise network filters. Despite the debatable sense behind such a function I was interested in the technical possibilities and current implementations. It turned out that there is no currently active project atm.

So, Can I have Gentoo back?

Filed under
Gentoo

Daniel Robbins: It appears that the Gentoo Foundation may be disappearing in a matter of time. Apparently, no one has time to actually do the work required to run the Foundation. There seems to be some momentum building behind the idea of handing over all of Gentoo's intellectual property to another Foundation.

Gimp Tutorial: Creating a Navigation Button

Filed under
Howtos

Navigation buttons are essential features of both web pages and application interfaces. In the following tutorial, we create an attractive navigation button in a few simple steps that can be followed even with limited Gimp knowledge.

http://jozmak.blogspot.com/

How to install TrueType fonts on your Ubuntu computer

Filed under
HowTos

ars geek: Have you ever wanted to just grab any old TrueType font of the web and start using it in applications on your Ubuntu machine? Did you know that you can and it’s not all that hard? Here’s how to get your system to recognize new fonts for any user.

Grovey! Amarok 2 Jingle contest well underway.

Filed under
Software

amarok.kde.org: The Amarok 2 Jingle Contest is well underway, and even though the contest runs until the 1st of October we have already received some pretty cool submissions.

Latest Mozilla Sunbird is a well-connected calendar

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Mozilla's Sunbird calendaring application lives perpetually in the shadow of its siblings Firefox and Thunderbird, garnering just a fraction of the developer effort and publicity lavished on the browser and email client. Nevertheless, it is slowing maturing into a reliable tool worthy of the Mozilla brand.

Opera 9.22 released

Filed under
Software

We released 9.22 today and it's a recommended security update. Bit Torrent also received some nice improvements, so it should be quite a bit faster now.

AMD 8.39.4 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: Last month was an interesting time for AMD and their ATI Linux display driver. The Radeon HD 2400 and 2600 series were introduced, but as we have unfortunately come to expect, there was not a supported R600 driver that day or even that month.

DSL answers user requests with 4.0 alpha

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: The alpha 1 development release of Damn Small Linux (DSL) 4.0, which hit the Net on Tuesday, is "a very different version" that includes a number of features requested by users on the DSL forums.

Installing the new Oxygen icons under KDE 3

Filed under
HowTos

open device: KDE 4 is coming, and it is bringing a truckload of improvements and goodies. Among these, there is the brand-new Oxygen icon theme. It is not straightforward to obtain a KDE 3 -installable theme from the KDE 4 SVN repository, however someone (as often happens in the OSS world) has done the dirty work for you

Inkscape Tutorial - The Sun

Filed under
HowTos

penguin pete: Half of the battle in graphic design is working smarter, not harder. I've done some tutorials for Gimp which push that tool to its limits, but too many folks focus on Gimp and forget that we have a whole arsenal of power graphics tools on the Linux desktop. Here is one image which would have been a pain to do in Gimp, but a snap in Inkscape.

TechBase Hits 1,000,000

Filed under
KDE

the dot: KDE's new technical documentation library, TechBase, hit an important milestone today when it served up its one millionth page. In step with the KDE 4.0 development cycle, TechBase is rapidly maturing into a central hub for high-level technical information related to KDE and the Free software desktop.

openSUSE News Goes Live

Filed under
SUSE

beineri's blog: Today one of my hack week projects went online: openSUSE News. Actually I have been working on it together with Robert Lihm already before and finished it only after.

Open standards beat Microsoft 13 to 4

Filed under
OSS

tectonic: Microsoft's plans of having its OOXML document format accepted as a South African national standard were thwarted by a conclusive vote against the move in a meeting yesterday.

Scribus: Open Source Desktop Publishing

Filed under
Software

Trusted Reviews: To read most of the digital press, you’d think InDesign was the only big-league desktop publishing (DTP) application anyone took seriously. A few might add QuarkXpress to that. There is a third contender, though, from a rather unusual source.

Useful OpenOffice Calc Formulas and Related Tricks

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice.org Tips: Here are some great tips that I think are useful: formulas, related items, and calculations built into Edit > Paste Special.

Illegal Codecs Put Me Off Linux

Filed under
Software

itmanagement: OK, I’ll be honest with you, the more I use Linux, the more I’m warming to it. But there’s one aspect of Linux that’s putting me off. This is the fact that to play a DVD or use WMA/WMV files I have to install codecs that are technically illegal to use.

Leaving Redmond, WA in 24 hours

Filed under
Ubuntu

tgdaily: This is the first install of what will be a periodic, ongoing series on how migrate from Microsoft's Windows to other Operating systems. This first article provides insight in the much discussed Ubuntu Linux.

Linux Expert: Microsoft Is Throwing Money Away

Filed under
Microsoft

rcpmag.com blogs: James Bottomley is really on top of things (sorry -- we had to say it) when it comes to Linux. The CTO of SteelEye Technology is also on the board of the Linux Foundation. As such, Bottomley's obviously got some insight into Microsoft's continued patent deals with Linux distributors.

Who copied who?

Filed under
Software

venture cake: Popular Linux desktop application Avant Window Navigator received a large amount of flak for using the same depth effect as Apple’s upcoming release of OS X. But things aren’t always what they seem.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: BSD

Security Leftovers

  • Stop using SHA1 encryption: It’s now completely unsafe, Google proves
    Security researchers have achieved the first real-world collision attack against the SHA-1 hash function, producing two different PDF files with the same SHA-1 signature. This shows that the algorithm's use for security-sensitive functions should be discontinued as soon as possible. SHA-1 (Secure Hash Algorithm 1) dates back to 1995 and has been known to be vulnerable to theoretical attacks since 2005. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology has banned the use of SHA-1 by U.S. federal agencies since 2010, and digital certificate authorities have not been allowed to issue SHA-1-signed certificates since Jan. 1, 2016, although some exemptions have been made. However, despite these efforts to phase out the use of SHA-1 in some areas, the algorithm is still fairly widely used to validate credit card transactions, electronic documents, email PGP/GPG signatures, open-source software repositories, backups and software updates.
  • on pgp
    First and foremost I have to pay respect to PGP, it was an important weapon in the first cryptowar. It has helped many whistleblowers and dissidents. It is software with quite interesting history, if all the cryptograms could tell... PGP is also deeply misunderstood, it is a highly successful political tool. It was essential in getting crypto out to the people. In my view PGP is not dead, it's just old and misunderstood and needs to be retired in honor. However the world has changed from the internet happy times of the '90s, from a passive adversary to many active ones - with cheap commercially available malware as turn-key-solutions, intrusive apps, malware, NSLs, gag orders, etc.
  • Cloudflare’s Cloudbleed is the worst privacy leak in recent Internet history
    Cloudflare revealed today that, for months, all of its protected websites were potentially leaking private information across the Internet. Specifically, Cloudflare’s reverse proxies were dumping uninitialized memory; that is to say, bleeding private data. The issue, termed Cloudbleed by some (but not its discoverer Tavis Ormandy of Google Project Zero), is the greatest privacy leak of 2017 and the year has just started. For months, since 2016-09-22 by their own admission, CloudFlare has been leaking private information through Cloudbleed. Basically, random data from random sites (again, it’s worth mentioning that every site that used CloudFlare in the last half year should be considered to having fallen victim to this) would be randomly distributed across the open Internet, and then indefinitely cached along the way.
  • Serious Cloudflare bug exposed a potpourri of secret customer data
    Cloudflare, a service that helps optimize the security and performance of more than 5.5 million websites, warned customers today that a recently fixed software bug exposed a range of sensitive information that could have included passwords and cookies and tokens used to authenticate users. A combination of factors made the bug particularly severe. First, the leakage may have been active since September 22, nearly five months before it was discovered, although the greatest period of impact was from February 13 and February 18. Second, some of the highly sensitive data that was leaked was cached by Google and other search engines. The result was that for the entire time the bug was active, hackers had the ability to access the data in real-time by making Web requests to affected websites and to access some of the leaked data later by crafting queries on search engines. "The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines," Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming wrote in a blog post published Thursday. "We are disclosing this problem now as we are satisfied that search engine caches have now been cleared of sensitive information. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence."

Security Leftovers

  • Change all the passwords (again)
    Looks like it is time to change all the passwords again. There’s a tiny little flaw in a CDN used … everywhere, it seems.
  • Today's leading causes of DDoS attacks [Ed: The so-called 'Internet of things' (crappy devices with identical passwords) is a mess; programmers to blame, not Linux]
    Of the most recent mega 100Gbps attacks in the last quarter, most of them were directly attributed to the Mirai botnet. The Mirai botnet works by exploiting the weak security on many Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The program finds its victims by constantly scanning the internet for IoT devices, which use factory default or hard-coded usernames and passwords.
  • How to Set Up An SSL Certificate on Your Website [via "Steps To Secure Your Website With An SSL Certificate"]
  • SHA-1 is dead, long live SHA-1!
    Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you heard that some researchers managed to create a SHA-1 collision. The short story as to why this matters is the whole purpose of a hashing algorithm is to make it impossible to generate collisions on purpose. Unfortunately though impossible things are usually also impossible so in reality we just make sure it’s really really hard to generate a collision. Thanks to Moore’s Law, hard things don’t stay hard forever. This is why MD5 had to go live on a farm out in the country, and we’re not allowed to see it anymore … because it’s having too much fun. SHA-1 will get to join it soon.
  • SHA1 collision via ASCII art
    Happy SHA1 collision day everybody! If you extract the differences between the good.pdf and bad.pdf attached to the paper, you'll find it all comes down to a small ~128 byte chunk of random-looking binary data that varies between the files.
  • PayThink Knowledge is power in fighting new Android attack bot
    Android users and apps have become a major part of payments and financial services, carrying an increased risk for web crime. It is estimated that there are 107.7 million Android Smartphone users in the U.S. who have downloaded more than 65 million apps from the Google App Store, and each one of them represents a smorgasbord of opportunity for hackers to steal user credentials and other information.
  • Red Hat: 'use after free' vulnerability found in Linux kernel's DCCP protocol IPV6 implementation
    Red Hat Product Security has published details of an "important" security vulnerability in the Linux kernel. The IPv6 implementation of the DCCP protocol means that it is possible for a local, unprivileged user to alter kernel memory and escalate their privileges. Known as the "use-after-free" flaw, CVE-2017-6074 affects a number of Red Hat products including Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and Red Hat Openshift Online v2. Mitigating factors include the requirement for a potential attacker to have access to a local account on a machine, and for IPV6 to be enabled, but it is still something that will be of concern to Linux users. Describing the vulnerability, Red Hat says: "This flaw allows an attacker with an account on the local system to potentially elevate privileges. This class of flaw is commonly referred to as UAF (Use After Free.) Flaws of this nature are generally exploited by exercising a code path that accesses memory via a pointer that no longer references an in use allocation due to an earlier free() operation. In this specific issue, the flaw exists in the DCCP networking code and can be reached by a malicious actor with sufficient access to initiate a DCCP network connection on any local interface. Successful exploitation may result in crashing of the host kernel, potential execution of code in the context of the host kernel or other escalation of privilege by modifying kernel memory structures."

Android Leftovers