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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 14 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Home automation hub runs Linux, offers cloud services Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 2:22am
Story Linux 3.17 Lands Memfd, A KDBUS Prerequisite Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 1:17am
Story LXQt 0.8 Is Being Released Soon Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 1:10am
Story About the use of linux for normal people Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 1:04am
Story Mesa 10.2.6 Has Plenty Of OpenGL Driver Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 12:53am
Story The Connected Car, Part 3: No Shortcuts to Security Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 12:38am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:43pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:42pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:41pm
Story Ubuntu 14.10's Feature Freeze Is This Wednesday Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:27pm

One more thing with Novell: the EULA

Filed under
SUSE

beranger.org: OK, it's about a Beta/Prerelease. Still, it's open source and governed by GPL or by more permissive licenses. And what is openSUSE 11.0b3 EULA saying? (Was it written by Microsoft, or what?)

Does OpenOffice.org fall short?

Filed under
OOo

blogs.zdnet.com: I am past-president for our local Lunix User Group and currently its education director. We have 4 servers running Linux, two desktops running Linux and 3 laptops running Windows. In general, OpenOffice lacks many features that frequent users of Office use.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Experience Easy, Excellent and Exciting Computing with the New Eee PC™

  • Legal Climate for Open-Source Users Changes With Litigation and License Revisions
  • Why Novell is cashing in on Linux
  • Shell Script To Monitor Disk Usage On Linux and Unix
  • Freeing up the future: Is open source best for business?
  • Mozilla Developer News June 3
  • Dr. Phatak speaks...and the world learns
  • Try doing this with proprietary software
  • GnuCash: Free Accounting Software
  • My Problems with Fedora 9
  • Dell Mini Inspiron? New Asus EeePC’s? Its the keyboard, silly
  • The X=X+1 Issue

5 Reasons Why JBoss Founder Marc Fleury is My Hero

Filed under
OSS

There is a funny thing about commercial open source software companies as much as they like talking about their community-driven open source heritage they end up doing a lot of things their proprietary counterparts do.

A Tale Of Two Experiences … Or Why I Don’t Use Windows

Filed under
Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: Today I booted into Windows XP MCE for the first time in 24 days. I would like to share my experience. I kept careful notes because I knew what to expect from past experience and I anticipated some of the problems that I will share.

Linux Gazette: June 2008 (#151)

Filed under
Linux

This month's Linux Gazette is online and ready to read. Topics include gDesklets: Beauty with a Purpose, USB thumb drive RAID, and Using Crontab.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to number each line in a text file on Linux

  • How to enable the universe and multiverse repositories in Ubuntu 8.04
  • How do I… Connect an Apple iPod to an Ubuntu Linux PC?
  • Install the linux mint menu in ubuntu hardy
  • How to change the hostname of a Linux system
  • zypper on opensuse
  • Run-levels: Create, use, modify, and master
  • Manage Ogg audio streams with OGMtools

Why do Open-Licensed drivers matter?

Filed under
OSS

zerias.blogspot: One of the more common questions to be found in open-licensed software today is why do open drivers matter? The theological and emotional factors of Open-Licensed software that drive many of the concerns today are simply lost on the average computer user. There need to be tangible benefits.

Tracking Kernel Oops

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "The http://www.kerneloops.org website collects kernel oops and warning reports from various mailing lists and bugzillas as well as with a client users can install to auto-submit oopses," began Arjan van de Ven, referring to a website first announced last December.

Three German KDE Deployments

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The IT Service Center Berlin has announced the development of a desktop system for the public services in Germany's capital. This is yet another public body making the switch to the Free Desktop system.

Alternative distros: Puppy Linux and antiX

Filed under
Linux

Josh Saddler: I'm in search of a lightweight distro for an ancient 1ghz, 128MB RAM laptop. One of these days, I'll find a distro that properly supports ACPI and VGA-out. I hope. Now, I'll sum up my impressions of Puppy Linux and antiX.

Flock 2.0 Based on Firefox 3 - Beta Coming Soon

Filed under
Moz/FF

cybernetnews.com: Mozilla is hard at work getting ready for the launch of Firefox 3, and another Release Candidate is scheduled to be available tomorrow. The Flock team is working equally as hard to make sure that they update their browser with all of the Firefox 3 goodness as soon as possible.

Urban Terror FPS is as realistic as today's headlines

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: Over the past two years, I've reviewed free software first-person shooters including Tremulous, Alien Arena, and Nexuiz -- all top-notch games. Now we can add Urban Terror to that list. While the first three sport other-worldly, sci-fi-style opponents, Urban Terror goes for realistic opponents -- as realistic as today's headlines.

Biedronka offers low cost Kubuntu based laptop

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Hardware
Moz/FF
OOo
GIMP

Biedronka, which is roughly the Polish equivaent to Wal-mart, is offering a laptop with Kubuntu pre-installed for only 999 PLN.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 - 1-Year End Of Life Notice

Filed under
Linux

redhat.com: In accordance with the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Errata Support Policy, the
7 year life-cycle of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 will end on May 31, 2009.

Review: A new all-in-one server

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computerworld.com: Almost exactly seven years ago, I reviewed four different "All-in-One" Internet appliances that included file, e-mail and Web servers and some other workgroup type utilities. Jumping into the fray is a new product from a fairly young company near Vancouver called Sutus. Sutus avoids security issues by using a hardened version of Gentoo Linux.

A Quick Look At Facebook's Open Source

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com/blog: The other week, when representatives from Facebook mentioned that they'd be open-sourcing significant portions of their platform, I hazarded a guess that they would be providing at most a set of APIs. Now that Facebook's actually released some code under the aegis of the Facebook Open Platform, I had a look-see.

Canonical Releases Ubuntu for Netbooks

Filed under
Ubuntu

practical-tech.com: The paint has barely dried on Ubuntu 8.04 when Canonical announced at the Computex trade show in Taiwan on June 3rd that it will be releasing a new version of Ubuntu 8.04 just for Intel Atom-based netbooks and UMPCs (Ultra Mobile PCs).

Upgrading to Slackware 12.1

Filed under
Slack

linux.com: Pat Volkerding and the Slackware team released the latest version of Slackware Linux, 12.1, on May 2. Even though it is a "point one" release, the list of new features reads like what other distributions would consider a major new version.

Linux Podcasts Roundup

Filed under
Linux

crunchbang.org: I have been working pretty hard lately, mainly coding some personal projects. I always used to listen to music whilst coding, these days I tend to listen to podcasts. Is that sad? Maybe, maybe not. Either way, I thought I would post a list of Linux and Ubuntu related podcasts which I listen to on a regular basis.

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More in Tux Machines

Australian Securities Exchange completes Red Hat migration

The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) has completed the migration of "mission-critical" legacy applications to the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). ASX first deployed JBoss EAP in 2011 to modernise its legacy technologies and to facilitate the introduction of new web applications after it realised its legacy application server platform was becoming increasingly inconsistent, unstable, and expensive. After the initial ASX Online Company migration was complete in 2012, ASX used JBoss EAP to build the ASX.com API, as well as its Sharemarket Game, which gives players the opportunity to learn how the share market works. Read more

Programming/Development: GAPID 1.0 and Atom 1.23

  • Diagnose and understand your app's GPU behavior with GAPID
  • GAPID 1.0 Released As Google's Cross-Platform Vulkan Debugger
    Back in March we wrote about GAPID as a new Google-developed Vulkan debugger in its early stages. Fast forward to today, GAPID 1.0 has been released for debugging Vulkan apps/games on Linux/Windows/Android as well as OpenGL ES on Android. GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and allows for analyzing rendering and performance issues with ease using its GUI interface. GAPID also allows for easily experimenting with code changes to see their rendering impact and allows for offline debugging. GAPID has its own format and capturetrace utility for capturing traces of Vulkan (or GLES on Android too) programs for replaying later on with GAPID.
  • Hackable Text Editor Atom 1.23 Adds Better Compatibility for External Git Tools
    GitHub released Atom 1.23, the monthly update of the open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor application loved by numerous developers all over the world. Including a month's worth of enhancements, Atom 1.23 comes with the ability for packages to register URI handler functions, which can be invoked whenever the user visits a URI that starts with "atom://package-name/," and a new option to hide certain commands in the command palette when registering them via "atom.commands.add." Atom 1.23 also improves the compatibility with external Git tools, as well as the performance of the editor by modifying the behavior of several APIs to no longer make callbacks more than once in a text buffer transaction. Along with Atom 1.23, GitHub also released Teletype 0.4.0, a tool that allows developers to collaborate simultaneously on multiple files.

Red Hat GNU/Linux and More

Security: VLC Bug Bounty, Avast Tools, Intel ME

  • European Commission Kicks Off Open-Source Bug Bounty
    The European Commission has announced its first-ever bug bounty program, and is calling on hackers to find vulnerabilities in VLC, a popular open-source multimedia player loaded on every workstation at the Commission. The program has kicked off with a three-week, invitation-only session, after which it will be open to the public. Rewards include a minimum of $2,000 for critical severity bugs, especially remote code execution. High severity bugs such as code execution without user intervention, will start at $750. Medium severity bugs will start at a minimum of $300; these include code execution with user intervention, high-impact crashes and infinite loops. Low-severity bugs, like information leaks, crashes and the like, will pay out starting at $100.
  • Avast launches open-source decompiler for machine code
    Keeping up with the latest malware and virus threats is a daunting task, even for industry professionals. Any device connected to the Internet is a target for being infected and abused. In order to stop attacks from happening, there needs to be an understanding of how they work so that a prevention method can be developed. To help with the reverse engineering of malware, Avast has released an open-source version of its machine-code decompiler, RetDec, that has been under development for over seven years. RetDec supports a variety of architectures aside from those used on traditional desktops including ARM, PIC32, PowerPC and MIPS.
  • Avast makes 'RetDec' machine-code decompiler open source on GitHub
    Today, popular anti-virus and security company, Avast, announces that it too is contributing to the open source community. You see, it is releasing the code for its machine-code decompiler on GitHub. Called "RetDec," the decompiler had been under development since 2011, originally by AVG -- a company Avast bought in 2016.
  • The Intel ME vulnerabilities are a big deal for some people, harmless for most
    (Note: all discussion here is based on publicly disclosed information, and I am not speaking on behalf of my employers) I wrote about the potential impact of the most recent Intel ME vulnerabilities a couple of weeks ago. The details of the vulnerability were released last week, and it's not absolutely the worst case scenario but it's still pretty bad. The short version is that one of the (signed) pieces of early bringup code for the ME reads an unsigned file from flash and parses it. Providing a malformed file could result in a buffer overflow, and a moderately complicated exploit chain could be built that allowed the ME's exploit mitigation features to be bypassed, resulting in arbitrary code execution on the ME. Getting this file into flash in the first place is the difficult bit. The ME region shouldn't be writable at OS runtime, so the most practical way for an attacker to achieve this is to physically disassemble the machine and directly reprogram it. The AMT management interface may provide a vector for a remote attacker to achieve this - for this to be possible, AMT must be enabled and provisioned and the attacker must have valid credentials[1]. Most systems don't have provisioned AMT, so most users don't have to worry about this.