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Saturday, 19 Aug 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Daniel Robbins Nominated for Gentoo Trustee ...or not

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.funtoo.org (Daniel Robbins): It looks like someone nominated me for the upcoming Gentoo trustee election. Before I know how to reply to this nomination, I need to know if it is even valid.

First look at Ulteo Desktop

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Using VNC to remotely access your desktop, applications, and documents sounds like a great solution when you are out and about, but it has a few significant drawbacks: you have to leave your machine turned on, the VNC protocol is not secure, and often you need a dedicated VNC client to access your desktop. Ulteo, the company started by Gaël Duval of Mandriva fame, is set to offer an alternative solution.

GIMP 2.4.4 Release Announced

Filed under
GIMP

GIMP 2.4.4 is a bug-fix release in the stable 2.4 series. Some include a fixed typo in stock icon name, removed duplicate entry from Tango palette, and fixed potential crash on missing CMYK color profile.

Your First Steps with Linux

Filed under
Linux

terminally-incoherent: Over the years I think I helped to influence few people here and there to actually start experimenting with linux. Here are the few tips I usually pass down to the newbies. I figured that I might as well record them here and just point people to this post from now on.

Ubuntu Ultimate 1.6: A Feature Rich Newbies friendly Desktop Linux distro

linuxondesktop.blogspot: Ubuntu is undoubtedly one of the most popular Linux distributions , it is popular with geeks as well as Linux newbies and even big computer cos like Dell are shipping their laptops with Ubuntu preinstalled . However Ubuntu usually comes with pretty limited number of applications and codecs. Ubuntu Ultimate 1.6 plays a role to resolve this issue.

Interview With Mandriva CEO, François Bancilhon

Filed under
Interviews
MDV

linuxjournal.com: Linux Journal recently caught up with Mandriva CEO, François Bancilhon, to find out more about a recently announced partnership between Mandriva of France and Turbolinux of Japan.

Fires ravage South African One Laptop project

Filed under
OLPC

tectonic.co.za: The South African arm of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project has suffered a setback following the past weekend’s devastating fires in the Western Cape.

Distrowar: Fluxbuntu vs. MiniMe

Filed under
Linux

junauza.blogspot.com: Fluxbuntu and MiniMe are ultra-lightweight versions of two equally popular Linux distributions namely Ubuntu and PCLinuxOS. Fluxbuntu kept it light by utilizing a Fluxbox window manager as well as other unhefty pre-installed applications. Meanwhile, MiniMe uses a KDE desktop but with minimum out-of-the-box software packages.

Asus Eee PC: Why is it SO Hot?

datamation: If you want to see the future of the portable PC, forget about the MacBook Air. Forget, too, about deluxe supertanker laptops like the HP Pavilion HDX, which fetches $1,999. No, to see where the portable computer industry is headed, take a look at the humble Asus Eee PC. All this enthusiasm raises the natural question: Why?

Also: Asus Brings EeePC and Linux to TVs, Desktop, and All-in-One

The Linux kernel: now and then

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: When Linus Torvalds was writing his kernel way back in the 1990s, he was working in a small bedroom in an average house in Finland and using hardware that wasn't exactly top of the range.

GIMP Animation Package 2.4.0 Released

Filed under
GIMP

GAP, the GIMP Animation Package, is a collection of plug-ins to extend GIMP with capabilities to edit and create animations. Version 2.4.0 of the GIMP Animation Package is now available. This is a bug-fix release that makes GAP usable with GIMP 2.4.x releases.

Review: SimplyMepis 7.0

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: SimplyMepis, or just Mepis for short, is a distribution built around an idea of being as simple for a new user as possible. I've heard a lot of talk about Mepis lately, yet I've never really tried it before. But given that I've heard so many glowing comments and reviews about it, I thought to take it for a spin myself and see what all the hype and fuss was about.

The future of Linux: what it means for Wikipedia

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: With 2,000 lines of code being added every single day, any lingering suggestion that Linux might suffer from a lack of support is clearly insane. But what lessons can the open-source OS teach its somewhat younger encyclopaedic cousin, Wikipedia?

French police deal blow to Microsoft

Filed under
Ubuntu

afp.google.com: The French paramilitary police force said Wednesday it is ditching Microsoft for the free Linux operating system, becoming one of the biggest administrations in the world to make the break.

First look: CrunchBang - A faster Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: Everybody knows Ubuntu, right? And I bet that some of you heard about Openbox, the standards compliant, fast, lightweight, extensible window manager (similar to Fluxbox). Well, CrunchBang is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu and powered by Openbox!

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • dillo: a super fast web browser

  • OLPC, by Jim Gettys
  • Put your program in, Pull your program out. That's what it's all about.
  • Progress drives Linux, greed drives Windows Vista
  • A practical guide to Ubuntu Linux
  • Why don't corporates love Debian?
  • Linux an inspiration for new ideas: expert
  • Ubuntu Help: Reporting bugs using Launchpad
  • What do Torvalds, Gates and Jobs Have In Common?
  • Epson Stylus C92 on Ubuntu Gutsy (7.10)
  • Delete Emacs backup files
  • "Real-time" Linux tools ported to Ubuntu
  • Mother-in-law on Linux? Yep.

Core Driver Patches in the 2.6.25 Merge Window

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Prefacing a series of 196 patches, Greg KH noted, "due to the low level nature of these patches, and because they touch so many different parts of the kernel, a number of the subsystem maintainers have asked me to get them in first to make merging other trees easier."

HP calls for a bit of help with open source tools

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.com.au: HP has called on developers to pitch in and help improve the open source management tools it made available to the community last week.

Also: OpenLogic: HP hogged FOSS announcement limelight

Mozilla Developer News - Jan 29

Filed under
Moz/FF

In this issue: Mozilla: celebrating the first ten years, Firefox 3 Beta 3 code freeze today, Firefox 2.0.0.12 scheduled for release on February 12, Mozilla Mobile prototype user-interfaces posted, and more.

A better ext4 filesystem for Linux

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: A new Linux filesystem gets rid of the 256-petabyte limit, and adds a checksum feature for the journal. But developers want you to know that it's not yet ready for production sytems.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: GnuCash, Minuet, Citrix, and YouTube

  • Escape from QuickBooks (with data in hand)
    When a small business contemplates getting away from a proprietary accounting tool like QuickBooks in favor of free software like GnuCash, the first order of business is usually finding a way to liberate that business's accounting data for input into a new system. Strangely enough, Intuit, the creator of QuickBooks, never quite got around to making that easy to do. But it turns out that, with a bit of effort, this move can be made. Getting there involves wandering through an undocumented wilderness; this article is at attempt to make things easier for the next people to come along.
  • Minuet – a guitar adventure
    As you remember from my last post, minuet currently supports multiple plugins to display its exercises. To change from one plugin to another, all you have to do is to press on the desired instrument name: for now, only “Guitar” and “Piano” are available.
  • Available Now: Linux VDA 7.15 LTSR!
    Originally, XenApp and XenDesktop releases occurred around once a year, similar to the Academy Awards, and contained significant updates. Many large enterprise customers needed to assess which version would be ideal to standardize their main production environment on for the coming years, unlike other customers seeking the latest features and capabilities who felt that the releases were not soon enough or feature requirements had changed over time.
  • [Video] YouTube screws us again and Linux is screwing itself.
    Google is up to their old tricks again.They have figured how to ripoff their content providers with a new ad algorithm. Meanwhile, Linux podcasting is a clown show and I'm sick of dealing with it.

Fedora: Fedora + Plasma + Unity, Design Interns, and New ISO Build

  • Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks?
    Hybrid things aren't usually the best option around. Like hybrid cars, for example. Technically, when you marry concepts, you change the energy state, and while this could make sense in that you blend the best of several worlds, when this is done in a forced manner over a short period of time rather than eons of evolution, you end with the worst bits as the product of your mutation. I read about the United theme for Plasma a few months ago, and given that I've spent a fair deal of time fiddling with themes and icons and fonts and making different desktop environments look prettier than their defaults, I was intrigued. So I decided to see whether the notion of having Plasma look like Unity is a sane option. Let us.  Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks? [...] What is thy point, Vanessa, the astute among you may ask? Well, I have nothing against United or its creators, but I did come to the conclusion that too much tweaking is worse than no tweaking, if this statement makes sense. I like the notion of trying to overcome the inherent problems in each desktop through the use of themes and extensions. After all, I've been doing that profusely for the past few months. But it gets undone when you cross the desktop environment space. Making Gnome better yes. Making Plasma better, absolutely. Unity as an overlay for Plasma, well tricky. There's too much disparity for you to be able to hide the underlying workflow mechanisms and UI philosophies. Then, every little inconsistency glares. You notice things you do not expect, and you get angry because there are certain things you do expect. Some transformations work quite well because they build on the foundations, e.g. various Gnome panels or Macbuntu. But Plasma has its own special charm and flow and making it into a weird version of Unity, which itself is a weird version of Gnome misses the bigger picture. And so, if you're asking me, Plasma and Unity are two separate worlds, best enjoyed in isolation. United is an interesting notion, but it also signifies the upper limit for my own wild ideas and tweaking. Yes, you can make it work, then again, it means taking away from the beauty and style of what these two desktops do, and that's not the purpose of my pimping guides. So we shall stop here, and explore other colors and shapes. Have fun, little penguins.
  • Fedora Design Interns 2017
    Here’s an update on internships. Older post linked to here. Quick recap: there’s been 2 long-term interns for Fedora design team since February, and one short-term guy, who came for 2 weeks at the beginning of June. Guys have been doing an amazing job, I can’t stress enough how happy I am to have them around.
  • F26-20170815 Updated ISOs released

today's howtos

Security: Hardware Back Doors, Microsoft Windows, Kronos

  • Hiding malware in boobytrapped replacement screens would undetectably compromise your mobile device
     

    On the one hand, if you let an untrusted stranger install hardware in your electronic device, you're opening yourself up to all kinds of potential mischief; on the other hand, an estimated one in five smartphones has a cracked screen and the easiest, most efficient and cheapest way to get that fixed is to go to your corner repair-shop.  

  • How hackers {sic} are targeting the shipping industry [iophk: "Microsoft TCO"]
     

    Whenever one of the firm's fuel suppliers would send an email asking for payment, the virus simply changed the text of the message before it was read, adding a different bank account number.  

  • Locky ransomware is back from the dead with two new strains [iophk: "Windows TCO"]
     

    What hasn't changed, though, is the method of distribution.Rather than rifling through the trove of spilt US National Security Agency exploits, as the groups behind WannaCry and NotPetya did, Locky is distributed via phishing emails containing malicious Microsoft Office files or zipped attachments containing a malicious script.

  • Connected cars could have an airbag problem
     

    "It's not the car manufacturers' fault, and it's not a problem introduced by them. The security issue that we leveraged in our research lies in the standard that specifies how the car device network (i.e., CAN) works," added Trend.

    [...] To eliminate the risk entirely, an updated CAN standard should be proposed, adopted, and implemented. This whole process would likely require another generation of vehicles."

  • Code chunk in Kronos malware used long before MalwareTech published it
    A chunk of code found in the Kronos bank-fraud malware originated more than six years before security researcher Marcus Hutchins is accused of developing the underlying code, a fellow security researcher said Friday. The conclusion, reached in an analysis of Kronos published by security firm Malwarebytes, by no means proves or disproves federal prosecutors' allegations that Hutchins wrote Kronos code and played a role in the sale of the malware. It does, however, clarify speculation over a Tweet from January 2015, in which MalwareTech—the online handle Hutchins used—complained that a complex piece of code he had published a month earlier had been added to an unnamed malware sample without his permission.
  • Secret chips in replacement parts can completely hijack your phone’s security
    People with cracked touch screens or similar smartphone maladies have a new headache to consider: the possibility the replacement parts installed by repair shops contain secret hardware that completely hijacks the security of the device. The concern arises from research that shows how replacement screens—one put into a Huawei Nexus 6P and the other into an LG G Pad 7.0—can be used to surreptitiously log keyboard input and patterns, install malicious apps, and take pictures and e-mail them to the attacker. The booby-trapped screens also exploited operating system vulnerabilities that bypassed key security protections built into the phones. The malicious parts cost less than $10 and could easily be mass-produced. Most chilling of all, to most people, the booby-trapped parts could be indistinguishable from legitimate ones, a trait that could leave many service technicians unaware of the maliciousness. There would be no sign of tampering unless someone with a background in hardware disassembled the repaired phone and inspected it.