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Tuesday, 31 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Vincent Danen: Linux vs Mac Community... a blog response

Filed under
Linux

I read with great amusement a blog entry from Bryan O'Bryan entitled Why I ditched my Mac for Linux and some of the comments (no time to read them all; perhaps later). Instead of leaving a comment there and having it lost in the 100+ comments, I decided to respond here.

KateOS 3.0 Beta: Now even easier

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Linux
Reviews

I recently got a chance to try out the new KateOS 3.0 alpha and beta versions, and I must say, I'm very impressed. The new release brings a number of improvements, such as OpenOffice.org 2.0.3 included by default, and all of the most recent versions of many applications.

Diction & Style

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HowTos

Over the years I have spent as much spare time as I can to get better at writing. I consider myself an adequate writer, not good, but adequate. Suprisingly I recently came across some old Unix tools that run right from the prompt and will not mangle the original text. Diction and style are not grammar checkers but instead, grammar helpers.

The case of some Flash based games unable to display text when viewed in GNU/Linux

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HowTos

One persistent problem I used to face while using GNU/Linux was when I visited sites containing certain flash based games. The games played well but they never displayed the text embedded in it.

Transparency, principles, and the Microsoft way...

In its short but illustrious history the FOSS movement has been accused of being akin to communism. So just the other day as I was considering whether to wear my hammer and sickle shirt, I saw some Microsoft press releases that made me choke on my unpleasant dark rye bread. Microsoft Executive lauds open source? Pardon?

Linux's foray into Windows territory

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Linux

The open-source Linux operating system has made deep in-roads into the servers of large companies, but employee desktop's have so far remained Microsoft's stronghold.

KDE 3: All About the Apps (Part 4)

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KDE

This is part four of the the successful series All About the Apps, reminding us that while KDE 4 development may be fun, to watch to find great apps working today KDE 3 beats them all. This time we report on the Linux equivalent of Cubase - Rosengarden, the great Basket, KPhotoAlbum and the next version of KDevelop.

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KDE Tip for SLED10

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HowTos

Team Mobile told us about a cool feature that is likely not documented. In KDE on SLED10, when you mouse over the screen resolution applet’s icon, you can use the mouse wheel to increase or decrease the screen brightness.

PPPoE ADSL in Zenwalk Linux

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HowTos

As with other Slackware derivatives, obtaining a properly-working PPPoE ADSL connection is not 100% trivial, despite the use of Roaring Penguin's rp-pppoe package.

Lighttpd howto setup cgi-bin access for perl programs

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HowTos

Lighttpd has mod_cgi module that allows you running perl and other server side programs (cgi-bin).

Beware of Suits Bearing Code

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OSS

While all the hoopla was taking place out in Portland at the Eight Annual O'Reilly Open Source Convention (OSCON) this week, some of us noted the ever-so-quiet death of what should have been a vibrant open source project: OpenDarwin.

Stiff Asks, Great Programmers Answer

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Misc

At some hot, boring afternoon I got an _Idea_. With the help of public accessible e-mail adresses I asked 10 questions to a bunch of programmers that I consider very interesting people, such as Linus Torvalds, Dave Thomas, & Guido Van Rossum.

Apache update for a remote vulnerability

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Software

The Apache project has disclosed a vulnerability in just about all versions of the Apache HTTP server. The problem only affects sites using mod_rewrite.

Death of the command line

Filed under
Linux

It's hard for me to imagine using an OS without a strong command line. But who really uses it? Well, I do, and maybe you do, but most Windows users certainly don't, and most Mac users are equally command line phobic. Linux users may be a bit more apt to drop into typing-land, but even there its being pushed into insignificance.

Mainstream Parallel Programming

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HowTos

Unfortunately, many people believe that Beowulfs don't lend themselves particularly well to everyday tasks. On one extreme, companies such as Pixar use these computer systems to render their latest films, and on the other, scientists around the world are using them this minute to do everything from simulations of nuclear reactions to the unraveling of the human genome. The good news is that high-performance computing doesn't have to be confined to academic institutions and Hollywood studios.

Configure OpenNMS Step By Step

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HowTos

OpenNMS is an opensource enterprise network management tool. It helps network administrators to monitor critical services on remote machines and collects the information of remote nodes by using SNMP. OpenNMS has a very active community, where you can register yourself to discuss your problems. Normally openNMS installation and configuration takes time, but i have tried to cover installation and configuration part in few steps.

LinuxWorld Reshuffles Its Trade Show & Conference Deck

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OSS

With LinuxWorld San Francisco 2006 just around the corner, curiosity is hovering in the air over IDG's plans for future Linux and open source events. What's the bottom line on this subject from IDG's VP of LinuxWorld, Melinda Kendall?

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Leftovers: OSS

  • Quantifying Benefits of Network Virtualization in the Data Center
    Modern data centers have increased significantly in scale and complexity as compute and storage resources become highly virtualized. The rise of the DevOps style of application deployment means that data center resources must be agile and respond rapidly to changing workload requirements. Data center network technologies have been challenged to keep up with these rapidly evolving application requirements.
  • Apache Zeppelin Joins Several Other Projects Gaining Top-Level Status
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Only a few days ago, the foundation announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. Now, it has announced that Apache Zeppelin has graduated as well. Zeppelin is a web-based notebook that enables interactive data analytics.
  • 6 Open Source Operating Systems for the Internet of Things (IoT)
    Whether you are small to large enterprises, IoT is one of the useful technology that can help you to be connected on-the-go.
  • 6 open source architecture projects to check out
    The world of architecture doesn't change as quickly as software, but architects are still finding new ways to share innovative designs and ideas. The open source architecture movement aims to make architectural designs, drawings, 3D renderings, and documentation freely available for integration into other projects under open source licenses. It owes much of its growth to the growing popularity of the maker movement, DIY culture, 3D printing, and CNC machines, as well as support from architects like Alejandro Aravana.
  • Yorubaname.com has gone opensource, codebase now on GitHub
    Online dictionary for yoruba names, YorubaName, has now made its backlog accessible to the public. In a post on their blog, the guys at YorubaName announced that the website codebase is now on GitHub.
  • A New Version of Rust Hits the Streets
    Version 1.9 of the Rust programming language has been released. Rust is a new language with a small but enthusiastic community of developers.
  • Here's how you can make a career in OpenStack
    OpenStack is one of the biggest open source movements. It is a free and open-source software platform for cloud computing, mostly deployed as an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). The software platform consists of interrelated components that control hardware pools of processing, storage, and networking resources throughout a data centre. According to the official website, hundreds of the world's largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day, reducing costs and helping them move faster. OpenStack has a strong ecosystem globally.
  • Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again [Ed: Microsoft lied about .NET going Open Source; just forked it into Open Core version]
    Microsoft's open source fork of the .NET platform, called .NET Core, will be modified for better compatibility with existing applications, says Program Manager Immo Landwerth in a recent post.
  • EMC Ships Open Source Tool for Cloud and IoT Devices
  • Watch Benjamin Hindman Co-Creator of Apache Mesos Speak Live Tomorrow at MesosCon [Ed: Microsoft proxy in a sense]
  • MesosCon Preview: Q&A with Twitter’s Chris Pinkham
  • How to secure your open source code [Ed: more marketing nonsense of Black Duck]
  • Luxembourg launches open data portal
    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg officially launched its national open data portal data.public.lu on April 8th. This portal, supported by Digital Luxembourg, the government agency in charge of digital affairs in the country, was presented during the Game of Code hackathon.
  • Denmark to accelerate government digitisation
    Open standards The existing shared solutions are to be adopted by all authorities and public sector institutions where relevant, according to a presentation in English. “Shared solutions need to be stable, secure and user-friendly, they will also be easy to implement because the infrastructure is based on open standards.” The strategy, an agreement involving the government, regions and municipalities, was announced on 12 May. It includes 33 initiatives, which among other things deal with ease of use, reuse of data, IT architecture, growth, security and digital skills, DIGST says.