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Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

hanging out at froscon

Filed under
KDE

vizzzion.org: Friday, after arrival, we took on the task of making sure the BBQ works and the beer is of high quality, I'm glad to announce that both failed none of our tests, so we were rather safe for saturday night -- same exercise.

MythTV 0.20.2 Release

Filed under
Software

mythtv.org: The major impetus for this release is the shutdown of TMS Labs; among other changes this adds Schedules Direct support. The 0.20.2 release notes have a list of the two major and many minor changes since 0.20.1.

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3: New Package Management

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE 10.3 is set to contain a new, significantly improved and more mature package management stack by default. Today we’ll be taking a look at the new package management and talking to Duncan Mac-Vicar Prett, one of the central libzypp developers.

Ubuntu 7.04 Revisited

Filed under
Ubuntu

Merlins Minute: I’ve been getting more done with Ubuntu since my last post so let me fill you in. Seeing as it’s free open source software, I think Microsoft is going to have serious competition in the home PC market before too long.

PostBooks ERP On Ubuntu 7.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This document describes how to set up PostBooks ERP on Ubuntu 7.04. The resulting system provides a powerful GUI-based ERP-system.

The Mountain Argument That Could Be a Molehill

Filed under
Microsoft

Linux Today: With all of the sturmundrang out there about Micrsoft's tentative foray into the world of open source licensing, it seems people may be missing another aspect of the discussion.

IPTraf, a ncurses based LAN monitor

Filed under
Software

DPotD: Sometimes you just want to see what connections your machine is making to the outside world and what ports it’s using. While wireshark and tcpdump are really nice for inspecting detailed package contents. IPTraf is really about connections and interface statistics.

Kate can do Searching

Filed under
KDE

Hartwork Blog: Two weeks have passed since I last showed pictures of a possible future of the searching experience with KatePart. Since then progress has been made: Florian Grässle of OpenUsability strongly improved my original dialog drafts and I started implementing the improved dialog mockups.

Eliminate Slow Boots Because of Disk Checking

Filed under
HowTos

tom-buntu: If you have been using Ubuntu for a while, you probably know that after 30 boots Ubuntu runs a check on the hard disk. This “Fsck” check slows down booting a lot.

Ubuntu Guide For Windows Users: Connecting To Shared Printers On Windows Computers

Filed under
HowTos

watchingthenet.com: For Windows users setting up and sharing printers on Windows Computers, the process is simple. On Ubuntu or Kubuntu the process is also very easy. This tutorial will show you how to setup and connect your Ubuntu or Kubuntu computer to a shared printer on Windows XP or Vista.

Ubuntu Linux (Gusty Gibbon) Disappointment

Filed under
Ubuntu

besttechie.net: Yesterday evening, I was in need of something to do and every now and then I get these urges to try out Linux as a desktop OS again. I saw that they had released a new beta version of Ubuntu (the Gusty Gibbon release - which is scheduled for final release sometime in October) and decided I’d try it out in a dual boot with Vista Ultimate and Ubuntu.

Arch saves Gobuntu, almost

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress.com: Against my better judgement, I tried to install Gobuntu off a daily build CD because I wanted to get a look at it, and to see if I would have any hardware issues with it.

The OLPC Linux Based Laptop Wins International Design Award

Filed under
OLPC

Linux Electrons: Yesterday, the Linux based One Laptop Per Child was presented an INDEX: AWARD for winning the Community category. The INDEX: AWARD is presented every other year, and in addition to the glory, each award comes with a €100 000 prize. INDEX: AWARD operates with five categories, which refer to the context for which the designs are intended: body, home, work, play and community.

Windows Genuine Advantage suffers worldwide outage, problems galore

Filed under
Microsoft

arstechnica: Late last night we started receiving reports from readers experiencing problems with Windows Genuine Advantage authentication. Users of both Windows XP and Windows Vista were writing to say that they could not validate their installations using WGA, and one user even said that his installation was invalidated by the service.

Just how many Linux machines will Dell really sell?

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe: I've been reading lately about how Dell is slated to sell just 20,000 PCs with Linux loaded on them. I've seen that number thrown repeatedly into the faces of an uncaring blogosphere by folks who obviously have no love for either Linux of Ubuntu.

Classmate PC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Following the Edu Day at aKademy, I got a Classmate PC which is a machine Intel developed. The laptop has a Suse system on it with KDE 3.5.1 and my goal is to see how KDE-Edu applications run on it.

Asus Eee PC Is Available In NCIXUS Retailer

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

laptopcom: If you are eager to have one Asus Eee mini laptop you can visit NCIXUS Retailer. They offer 5 models with different 5 prices that you can order. The retailer says that your order shipment takes 1 to 2 weeks.

Nano-review of Ubuntu 7.10 alpha 5, part 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogbeebe: After booting this release of Ubuntu on a machine with an ATI graphics card, I moved over to my other box that has an nVidia-based Gigabyte 7600 GS AGP video card. I had no idea how Ubuntu would handle this card in a live situation.

Linux: Volatile Performance

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In the continuining discussion about how GCC treats the volatile keyword, Linus Torvalds noted, "I just have a strong suspicion that 'volatile' performance is so low down the list of any C compiler persons interest, that it's never going to happen. And quite frankly, I cannot blame the gcc guys for it."

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SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension

Historically, data replication has been available only piecemeal through proprietary vendors. In a quest to remediate history, SUSE and partner LINBIT announced a solution that promises to change the economics of data replication. The two companies' collaborative effort is the headliner in the updated SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension, which now includes LINBIT's integrated geo-clustering technology. Read more

Tizen and Android

Open source is mission critical for Europe’s air traffic

It is entirely possible to use open source in a highly regulated environment such as air traffic control, says Dr Gerolf Ziegenhain, Head of Linux Competence & Service Centre (LCSC) in Mainz (Germany). Open source service providers can shield an organisation from the wide variety of development processes in the open source community. Read more

today's leftovers

  • DRM display resource leasing (kernel side)
    So, you've got a fine head-mounted display and want to explore the delights of virtual reality. Right now, on Linux, that means getting the window system to cooperate because the window system is the DRM master and holds sole access to all display resources. So, you plug in your device, play with RandR to get it displaying bits from the window system and then carefully configure your VR application to use the whole monitor area and hope that the desktop will actually grant you the boon of page flipping so that you will get reasonable performance and maybe not even experience tearing. Results so far have been mixed, and depend on a lot of pieces working in ways that aren't exactly how they were designed to work.
  • GUADEC accommodation
    At this year’s GUADEC in Manchester we have rooms available for you right at the venue in lovely modern student townhouses. As I write this there are still some available to book along with your registration. In a couple of days we have to a final numbers to the University for how many rooms we want, so it would help us out if all the folk who want a room there could register and book one now if you haven’t already done so! We’ll have some available for later booking but we have to pay up front for them now so we can’t reserve too many.
  • Kickstarter for Niryo One, open source 6-axis 3D printed robotic arm, doubles campaign goal
    A Kickstarter campaign for the Niryo One, an open source 3D printed 6-axis robotic arm, has more than doubled its €20,000 target after just a couple of days. The 3D printed robot is powered by Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Robot Operating System.
  • Linux Action Show to End Eleven Year Run at LFNW
    Jupiter Broadcasting’s long-running podcast, Linux Action Show, will soon be signing off the air…er, fiber cable, for the last time. The show first streamed on June 10, 2006 and was hosted by “Linux Tycoon” Bryan Lunduke and Jupiter Broadcasting founder Chris Fisher. Lunduke left the show in 2012, replaced by Matt Hartley, who served as co-host for about three years. The show is currently hosted by Fisher and Noah Chelliah, president of Altispeed, an open source technology company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota.