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About Tux Machines

Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LibreOffice: New AND Improved srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 6:57pm
Story Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal), Reviewed In Depth srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:58pm
Story Hypervisor Fight Is Good for Customers, Good for FOSS srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:56pm
Story FSF favors LibreOffice over OpenOffice srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:54pm
Story Solving the Mystery of Red Hat srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:53pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:57am
Story Clouds Eventually Burst srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:55am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:44am
Story Adventures in Linux Mint 11 srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 2:34am
Story Developing a software giant on the ideals of open-source srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 2:32am

Roots access - Genealogy with GRAMPS

Filed under
Software

Genealogy is a burgeoning hobby and to help the home genealogist, a whole range of software is available. Much of it is commercial but here I’ll look at one of the most popular free software options—GRAMPS. Charting your family history needn’t mean compromising on licensing.

Review: VectorLinux 5.8

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

VectorLinux, a lightweight, fast Linux distribution for the x86 platform, just released its new version 5.8 this week. This user-friendly distribution makes the average computer user's life easy by supplying office software, Web browsing, photo editing, and archiving on top of a fast, clean Xfce window manager.

GNOME 2.17.4 Screenshots

Filed under
Software

The GNOME camp has pushed out a new development release in time for the holidays. GNOME 2.17.4 is another test release in the road to GNOME 2.18.0 in March of next year. Many packages were updated from GNOME 2.17.3, so this afternoon we had set out on a GARNOME adventure to capture some new GNOME screenshots to see how GNOME 2.17 is shaping up. Overall it looked quite well except for a few more bugs than normal.

GNOME 2.17.4 Screenshots

Ubuntu Linux 6.06 Christian Edition

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

One of the virtues of Linux is that there's pretty much a version of it for everybody. From regular Ubuntu to Gentoo to Berry Linux to Fedora to Damn Small Linux, there's something out there for virtually all types of Linux users. So I was intrigued to discover that there is a Christian version of the extremely popular Ubuntu Linux distribution.

Linux Desktop 2006: better than ever

Filed under
Linux

I recently read a story that asked, "Has the Desktop Linux Bubble Burst?" Burst!? No, I don't think so. Actually, it still isn't even half as big as it will be when it's full.

Laptops, mobilily and simplicity

Filed under
Linux

A little while ago, I decided that I would never, ever have a desk ever again. I bought a laptop, and after a week I promised I would never, ever buy anything but a laptop and would change my working area in my house. From our latest poll, it's clear that I am not alone. Where does this leave Linux?

Penguins are this winter's hot trend

Filed under
Misc

Forget polar bears. This winter's "it" critter is unquestionably the penguin. America's love affair with penguins stretches from Hollywood to publishing to the Internet.

Today's Howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install KDE Desktop in Ubuntu

  • Webmin Installation and Configuration in Ubuntu Linux
  • Install TrueCrypt on Ubuntu Edgy
  • How to forcefully empty the Trash : Ubuntu
  • Looking Glass for Ubuntu
  • Mount Network File systems (NFS,Samba) in Ubuntu
  • Setting up a server for PXE network booting

Defense Lawyer Attacks DNA Evidence in Hans Reiser Case

Filed under
Reiser

The defense lawyer for Oakland computer programmer Hans Reiser tried to raise doubts today about DNA evidence that prosecutors believe connects him to the death of his wife Nina Reiser, who was last seen alive Sept. 3.

Finding the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Linux desktops should receive general market acceptance. But they don't. The reason: The tyranny of the installed base, among other things.

New NVIDIA Linux Display Driver

Filed under
Software

Version: 1.0-9746
Release Date: December 21, 2006

Release Highlights:

  • Added support for GeForce 8800 GTS and GeForce 8800 GTX boards.

Downloads

Linux Migrations Made Simpler

Filed under
Linux

Running a Microsoft Windows NT server these days is a brave (or, perhaps, stupid) thing to do: Support for the product has finished, and as far as Microsoft is concerned, the product should be put in a rest home for retired software. There are many reasons to consider migrating some or all of your data center servers to Linux, and we won't go into them here. But if you do decide to go open source, some ways of going about it are better than others.

Browsing, Open Source and Litigious Affairs

Internetnews.com wades through the top stories and issues that rocked the industry in 2006 in this ongoing series.

Red Hat: Earnings up, customers in, competitors out

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat knocked the ball out of the park again this quarter, especially in light of the competitive pressures from Microsoft/Novell and Oracle. I joined in the earnings call today, and was very impressed.

Linux Devices in 2006

Filed under
Linux

As 2006 winds to a close, the editors of LinuxDevices.com have assembled a retrospective aimed at highlighting major trends and events in the world of embedded Linux. Of the approximately 1,200 stories we published this year, these were the most important, in our opinion.

Looking into the FSF's BadVista campaign

Filed under
Microsoft

BadVista is the latest in a series of activist campaigns launched by the Free Software Foundation (FSF)in the last eight months. It follows the highly successful Defective By Design campaign against so-called Digital Rights Management (DRM) technologies, and an unnamed effort to encourage the activist media to make free software part of their agenda.

Hans Reiser Selling Company

Filed under
Reiser
Interviews

Hans Reiser, the prominent Bay Area Linux programmer charged with murdering his wife, says he's seeking to sell off his open-source file system company, Namesys, to help pay mounting legal costs.

ATI AYiR 2006

Filed under
Software

Earlier this month our NVIDIA AYiR (A Year in Review) 2006 article was published. Now it is ATI Technologies turn as we see how they have revolutionized their much-debated Linux fglrx display drivers. We also benchmarked all twelve of their drivers from this year and see what the ATI/AMD camp has in store for next year. Without further ado, we present the ATI AYiR 2006!

Creating Partitions in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Partitions are physical or logical portions of a disk; a filesystem is the logical arrangement of data on a physical or logical partition so that your computer system can access and store data there.

Librarians stake their future on open source

Filed under
OSS

A group of librarians at the Georgia Public Library Service has developed an open source, enterprise-class library management system that may revolutionize the way large-scale libraries are run.

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.