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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Friendly – What It Is srlinuxx 15/10/2011 - 7:07pm
Blog entry OpenIndiana Desktop 151 review finid 15/10/2011 - 4:17pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 15/10/2011 - 6:49am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 15/10/2011 - 6:29am
Story Desktop virtualization: Parallels vs. VMware vs. VirtualBox srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 11:39pm
Story First Linux Benchmarks Of AMD FX-8150 Bulldozer srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 11:36pm
Story Word on the Street srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 11:35pm
Story Looking for a Polished Linux Desktop? Consider KDE srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 8:46pm
Story CAINE (Computer Aided INvestigative Environment) – Digital Forensics LiveCD srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 7:24pm
Story Sabayon 7 vs. Ubuntu 11.10 Performance srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 7:22pm

How to hide an entire filesystem

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Simple file encryption is useful, but sometimes it's more useful to encrypt a complete filesystem or disk, such as when you need to protect a large set of files. Or you may need not only to protect, but to completely hide the presence of sensitive data from prying eyes. For these cases, here are several options for securing your systems.

Linspire and Ubuntu team up agains MS

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This partnership will see Linspire base Linspire/Freespire on Ubuntu, while Canonical will in turn use Linspire's CNR commercial software e-commerce technology. Both companies believe that they will benefit in this partnership by promoting the adoption of Linux in the Microsoft dominated desktop market.

Setting up NX Terminal Server on Ubuntu

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I have setup a remote desktop to allow her to connect to and use, thus confining the greater bandwidth usage to our unlimited broadband connection in Blightey so she gets a speedier desktop experience via dialup whilst only consuming the small bandwidth needed to receive the remote desktop itself. The solution I’ve chose is NX server.

The setup routine (in order)went like this:

Ubuntu Refuses to Ship Me CDs

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In a very very strange turn of events, Canonical has refused to ship me CDs of its Linux distribution, Ubuntu.

The Web smiley's motto: Grin and bear it

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Author Vladimir Nabokov said in a 1969 New York Times interview that "there should exist a special typographical sign for a smile--some sort of concave mark, a supine round bracket."

Linux for Beginners

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Linux is getting hotter and more mainstream all the time—enough so that even IT administrators who deal primarily with Windows would do well to get their feet wet with Linux.

Back to school - tuXlab reviewed

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tuXlabs is a freely distributed educational software package running on a specialised Ubuntu derivative which has been rolled out to schools across South Africa and serves over 160 000 learners. Tectonic has covered various stories on it in the past and it seemed about time to give it a try.

The time for revolution has come

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We are at a cusp in computing history. This time is now a delicate balancing point where the future of computing can go one way or another. It is also obvious that one party stands to lose a great deal while another stands to win a great deal. Ironically the party that stands to lose the most is the one who has brought this turning point into reality.

Eugenia: Ubuntu installed on the Inspiron 640m

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Only a few hours after playing with Vista, I resized that partition (Vista now has a “shrink” utility) to 60 MBs and left 40 MBs free for Ubuntu (the rest 20 GBs are reserved by DELL as a recovery partition).

Installing The Aptana AJAX Development Environment On Ubuntu

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This tutorial shows how to install the Aptana IDE on an Ubuntu Edgy Eft system. The Aptana IDE is a free, open-source, cross-platform, JavaScript-focused development environment for building Ajax applications.

Introduction to OpenID

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OpenID is an open decentralized digital identity system that has been gaining traction in recent months. It implements a solution to some everyday headaches such as single-sign-on, but it does not address related issues like privacy, trust, spam prevention, or message authentication. OpenID uses a multiple-stage sign-on process, but don't let that discourage you.

The Business Case for Open Source Software

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For all the hype regarding Open Source Software (OSS), we sometimes forget logic in the excitement of trying to get on board with this latest trend. What we really care about (or should care about) is making a sound business decision regarding software. Think everyone is hopping on the OSS bandwagon because the software doesn't cost anything?

The Battle of Media Centers for Linux

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If there is one thing that seems to be standard in the open source world, it would seem to be the abundance of overlapping projects that might be better suited to work together rather than completing software visions on their own. Today, we are going to look at the trend and even consider some examples.

How to Enable and Disable Ubuntu Root Password

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Ubuntu is one of the few Linux distributions out there that will not enable the root account.If you want to do something with root permission on the console you have to type sudo before the command.

sudo" means superuser do. "sudo" will prompt for "Password:". Please specify user password

How GPLv3 addresses the EUCD and DMCA

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Draft 3 of GPLv3 should be out Real Soon Now, so I'd like to review some of the topics. I couldn't find a thorough explanation of how GPLv3 will deal with the "anti-circumvention" clauses of the DMCA and it's EU counterpart, the the EUCD (see Article 6), so here's my layperson understanding.

Novell loses another Samba team member

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A reliable Novell source has sent me Samba team member Guenther Deschner's farewell email to Novell staff and a follow-up from Lars Mueller, another Samba core team member.

Of course Deschner left over Novell's agreement with Microsoft and the bad-faith actions that Novell has taken regarding its GPL-licensed software in connection with that agreement.

Installing Ubuntu - So easy, I may be about to join the darkside

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The other day i thought I'd give linux a shot. so I went along to the ubuntu page ( and clicked download. downloaded the iso for 6.10 that went pretty quickly - while I was doing other bits and pieces on the web, and it took a grand total of about 45 minutes.

The Road to KDE 4: Amarok 2 Development is Underway

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This week we'll take a brief look at some of the many features that are making their way into Amarok 2, which is the development branch for Amarok in KDE 4.The features discussed are all in progress features which have reached varying stages of completion. Read on for information about Amarok's engines (including Phonon), UI changes, changes to the Magnatune music store, OS X support, and more.


Review of Damn Small Linux 3.2

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Damn Small Linux (DSL) is based on KNOPPIX, so anyone who has used KNOPPIX or Debian in the past will feel right at home. The entire system is around 50MB so it will fit on small, business-card CD-R's and cheap USB memory sticks. DSL is a live CD, meaning it will run completely from a CD without having to install it to your hard drive.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel News

  • Applying the Linus Torvalds “Good Taste” Coding Requirement
    In a recent interview with Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, at approximately 14:20 in the interview, he made a quick point about coding with “good taste”. Good taste? The interviewer prodded him for details and Linus came prepared with illustrations. He presented a code snippet. But this wasn’t “good taste” code. This snippet was an example of poor taste in order to provide some initial contrast.
  • DTrace for Linux 2016
    With the final major capability for BPF tracing (timed sampling) merging in Linux 4.9-rc1, the Linux kernel now has raw capabilities similar to those provided by DTrace, the advanced tracer from Solaris. As a long time DTrace user and expert, this is an exciting milestone! On Linux, you can now analyze the performance of applications and the kernel using production-safe low-overhead custom tracing, with latency histograms, frequency counts, and more.
  • The initial bus1 patch posting

OSS Leftovers

  • Pitt, partners create open source software for cancer genome data
    Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, UPMC and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center have created software to help investigators more easily navigate genomic cancer data. The free, open-source software, profiled Thursday in the journal PLOS ONE, processes data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. Funding for the new software was provided by the Institute of Precision Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.
  • Starting a Career as an Open Source Developer
    "Disney, John Deere and Walmart. Any idea what these three companies have in common?" The question was asked on Wednesday by Brandon Keepers, GitHub's head of open source. He was about three minutes into a session he was conducting called "Contributing to Your Career" at the All Things Open conference. "All three of these companies are actually software companies," he answered after taking a moment to tease the audience. "They do other things. They build tractors, protect trademarks and build amusement parks, and sell groceraies and things that you need everyday. But they've also become software companies and they've become really active in open source -- and they're not alone."
  • A look at how retail giant Walmart is becoming open source first
    It’s rare that we speak to large, global enterprises that are redesigning their technology stack and culture around an open source first policy. More often than not companies stick to their legacy vendors of choice, or they shift to ‘reliable’ cloud/digital vendors where similar buying rules apply. However, that’s exactly what Walmart is doing. Since acquiring performance lifecycle management start-up OneOps four years ago, in order to implement a DevOps approach to its e-commerce environment, the retailer is also prioritising open source over everything else – with it having made a big investment in OpenStack for its infrastructure.
  • Open source no longer scares the enterprise
    Open source breaks the rules on corporate procurement, but developers never play by the rules and now open source has sneaked in through the back door A study by Vanson Bourne for Rackspace reports that businesses are making big savings by using open source. In the survey of 300 organisations, three out of five respondents cited cost savings as the top benefit, reducing average cost per project by £30,146.
  • Defining MANO: Open Source vs. Standards
    As service providers are working to deploy NFV-based services, they are finding that management and orchestration (MANO) is a pain point. One of the big questions about MANO is how we go from a high-level architecture diagram to interoperable implementations. Do we take the traditional telco path and work through standards bodies? Or do we take a cloud-centric path and focus on open source development projects?
  • Eclipse Kapua IoT Project Gets Code from Eurotech and Red Hat
    The nascent Eclipse Kapua project got a big boost this week from its chief sponsors, open source solutions provider Red Hat and M2M/IoT platform provider Eurotech. The two companies announced their first official code contributions to the recently approved project, through which they are developing a modular, cloud-based platform for managing IoT gateways and smart edge devices. Red Hat and Eurotech collaborated to propose the project last June.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • ESDS Teams Up With Red Hat On Managed Cloud Hosting Services
    ESDS Software Solution has announced that it has joined hands with Red Hat to bring together the benefits of cloud solutions to legacy applications and enterprise databases. Customers can now avail managed data and cloud hosting services on ESDS eNlight Cloud platform that allows vertical auto scaling of virtual machines. ESDS can now offer needed agility to enterprises that may not otherwise reap the benefits of cloud, given the architecture of their systems. eNlight Cloud is a state-of-the-art cloud hosting solution with a built-in ability to automatically scale CPU and RAM on-the fly. Customers can now access the benefits of automatic load sensing and scaling, pay-per-consumption metered billing, root access to enterprise databases and managed OS, database and network services by using Red Hat Enterprise Linux on patented eNlight Cloud. This solution is targeted at customers across several verticals including aviation, banking, manufacturing, oil & gas, shipping and telecommunications.
  • Swisscom, UKCloud Adopt Red Hat OpenStack Platform
    Red Hat announced today that both Swisscom and UKCloud will be leveraging its OpenStack platform as the companies transition toward cloud computing. Swisscom will use the platform to develop its own cloud platform, and UKCloud will provide its customers with the ability to deliver digital services directly to UK citizens.
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Stake Increased by Rail Splitter Capital Management LLC
  • Bodhi 2.3.0 released
    Bodhi 2.3.0 is a feature and bug fix release.
  • Fedora at Ohio Linuxfest 2016
    We arrived at the our hotel around 1PM on Friday. After checking in we headed over to find the new site in the Hyatt Regency Hotel. The first things we noticed was the Columbus Convention Center is doing a major renovation and one of those renovations was they removed the escalators from the food court to the second floor. At first we thought this may be a issue to move the event stuff in but there was an elevator close by. Also no signage for OLF in the Food Court area. After getting off the elevator on the second floor there was a sign pointing around the corner to the Ohio Linuxfest registration table. This year Ohio Linuxfest charged $10 for general attendees (free to students with student ID). We checked in and out our badges (yes insert favorite Blazing Saddles joke here). We walked down to the Vendor Expo hall which this year had a grand total of 28 exhibitors (see website for vendor lists). While the Expo was setup ready for Vendors to move in but the Vendor Expo was not open to the public on Friday.

Android Leftovers

  • Android 7.0 Nougat: 15 hidden tips and tricks
    WE'VE RAIDED THE release notes in pieces past, but this time around (and with Google's Pixel XL in tow) we're running through some of the more useful additions to have found their way into the latest Android build. And for those of you who've skipped to the end, cats and hamburgers both have their uses...
  • Why Apple-to-Android upgrade comparisons are utterly meaningless
    Android upgrades are a contentious topic. Bring 'em up in any way, and you're bound to see some riled up people. I should know: I've observed and analyzed Android upgrades for years now -- all the way back to the now-ancient-seeming Android 2.2 Froyo era, when widespread rollouts for the platform were still an untested concept. And in all of that time, one thing has stayed pretty much the same: By and large, Android manufacturers suck at delivering timely and reliable OS updates. But hang on: Not everything about the Android upgrade situation has remained constant over these past several years. In fact, one very significant area has evolved considerably -- and it's an area that's almost always overlooked as part of the Android upgrade discussion, particularly when iOS comparisons come into the picture. As we think about Google's new Pixel phone and its unique position as the sole current handset guaranteed to get quick and regular Android updates, it's important to step back and put the situation in perspective -- because there really is much more to it than what we see on the surface. And while iPhone-to-Android upgrade comparisons are an inevitable side effect of the discussion (and one I've already heard brought up plenty in the context of the Pixel, especially when it comes to its short-seeming two-year window for support), the truth is that upgrades on iOS and Android are drastically different beasts.
  • BlackBerry reveals its LAST ever Android smartphone
    Marking BlackBerry's third foray into Android devices, the DTEK60 has been designed to take on the likes of Samsung and HTC with a polished look and powerful hardware. The device features a 5.5-inch QuadHD display with a resolution of 2,560x1,440-pixels and a pixel density of 538ppi, which BlackBerry says can display up to 16 million colours. Inside, there's a speedy quad-core Snapdragon 820 processor from Qualcomm, backed up by 4GB of RAM and 32GB of storage, which can be boosted up to 2TB via a microSD card.
  • Latest Strategy Analytics data shows Chinese Android manufacturers eating at Apple’s marketshare
    Apple just reported its latest earnings yesterday evening, and now Strategy Analytics is out with its latest report concerning the smartphone industry. The latest data shows the entire smartphone industry saw shipments rise 6 percent year over year to hit 375 million worldwide during Q3 2016. Shipment rose from 345.2 million units in Q3 2015 to 375.4 million in Q3 2016, which is the industry’s fastest growth rate for a year. Strategy Analytics attributes much of this growth to new product launches from Apple. Individually for Apple, though, the numbers weren’t as bright. The company saw its shipments fall from 48 million to 45.5 million, just as it reported during its earnings call. This fall pushed Apple’s marketshare from 13.6 percent to 12.1 percent, though Apple is holding strong to its #2 spot.
  • Android, Samsung Improve in Third Quarter
    Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP) released analysis of the results of its research on mobile phone operating systems and brands for the calendar quarter that ended September 30, 2016. This analysis features findings about market share trends in mobile phone operating systems and brands in the US from July-September 2016. CIRP research shows that the two major mobile operating systems, Google Android and Apple iOS, controlled about 97% of US customer mobile phone activations in the third quarter (Chart 1). In the September 2016 quarter, Android accounted for 71% of US activations, the same share as the year-ago September 2015 quarter, and up from 63% in the June 2016 quarter. iOS accounted for 26% of activations, about the same as its 27% share in the year-ago September 2015 quarter, but down from its 32% share in the June 2016 quarter.
  • This Android keyboard trick fixes bad autocorrect suggestions
  • 11 things Android phone makers should copy from the Pixe
  • Review: 7 PDF editing tools for iOS and Android
  • Qualcomm acquires NXP Semiconductors for $47 billion
  • Moto M with metal body and Snapdragon 625 leaks