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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Counter-Rant srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 4:52pm
Story 17 things we'd change about names in Linux srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 4:11pm
Story today's howtos & leftovers: srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 5:12am
Story Ubuntu Light | Access the web within 7 seconds srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 2:21am
Story Pardus and Xfce: a bright and powerful parade srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 2:19am
Story 12 killer apps for linux srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 2:17am
Story today's howtos & leftovers: srlinuxx 1 12/06/2011 - 12:29am
Story Linux is killing Linux on the desktop srlinuxx 11/06/2011 - 10:55pm
Story Krusader The Ultimate Two Panel File Manager srlinuxx 11/06/2011 - 10:52pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News 179 srlinuxx 11/06/2011 - 10:51pm

The year in pop culture

Filed under
Misc

It's not always about you, you know. Except in 2006, it was.

It was all about YouTube, the Internet phenomenon that felt like the final elimination of the increasingly blurry line between the providers of entertainment and the consumers. On YouTube and its multiplying online kin, you're both.

Which is better for technical support

Filed under
OSS

In the never ending battle against the open source proponents and the closed source confederates an argument that always seems to add fuel to the fire is technical support. Indeed for many businesses the ability to provide support for a computing solution is a critical part of the decision making process.

Nouveau: A First Look

Filed under
Software

Nouveau is a community project that is working on producing open-source 3D display drivers for NVIDIA's graphics cards. Nouveau is not affiliated with NVIDIA Corporation and is an X.Org Foundation project. While this project is still far from being completed, for this holiday special we are sharing some of our first thoughts on this project from our experience thus far. This article today will also hopefully shed some light on the advancements of this project so far.

Warzone 2100 2.0.5

Filed under
Gaming

The Warzone Resurrection team is proud to present to you: Warzone 2100 Version 2.0.5 This release should fix all those nasty bugs with singleplayer and tutorial games, you may have experienced in 2.0.4. But there are also some new features:

NVIDIA hotfix NV121906 – Update for SATA Disk Drives

Filed under
Hardware

Do you own an NVIDIA nForce® 680i "Designed by NVIDIA" motherboard? Some NVIDIA nForce 680i SLI "Designed by NVIDIA" motherboard customers have reported experiencing disconnect or write error issues with SATA disk drives. To address this, NVIDIA has released a BIOS update.

Legendary Singer James Brown Dies at 73

Filed under
Obits

'Godfather of Soul' James Brown, Whose Singing and Dancing Inspired Generations, Dies at 73

DOS Emulation with DOSBox - Get your old-school game on!

Filed under
Gaming
HowTos

As a Christmas gift to my brother I decided to do a little research and figure out how he could experience some of the old-school gaming enjoyment that I grew up with. Remember the old games? 2D. Bad sound. No story. Yes, those were the days! Forget all that World of Warcraft stuff, I’m talking about old-school DOS based games.

Three Ubuntu Books, reviewed by Groklaw's luvr

Filed under
Reviews

This is perfect for a lazy day. Groklaw member luvr sends us his review of three Ubuntu books, “Moving to Ubuntu Linux,” “The Official Ubuntu Book,” “Ubuntu Unleashed.” Enjoy. Maybe today is a good day to give Ubuntu or Kubuntu a whirl, if you haven't already?

My Ubuntu Room

Filed under
Ubuntu

A true fan and Ubuntu lover has surrounded himself in Ubuntu! Take a look at his "Ubuntu Room." Included are a large mural of the Ubuntu logo as well as his declaration of being an Ubuntu Lover.

Photos Here.

Taking the plunge

Filed under
Linux

For as much as I talk up Openbox, and as much as I distro-hop and tinker with desktop environments, I always kept one machine with a straight Xubuntu 6.06.1 installation on it. But today I decided it was time for change. So I blanked the system drive, set it up as a speed-tweaked Edgy system, and set it loose.

Predictions for 2007 (and how I did on 2006)

Filed under
Misc

Let's dig up my predictions for 2006 and see how I did first. So two and two, with one partial. Time for 2007.

On Setting up an Ubuntu Server

Filed under
Ubuntu

For a project I'm involved with, we're setting up a shiny new server to handle hosting of lots (and lots) of Drupal sites in a shared hosting environment. Our friendly neighbourhood colocation provider installed Ubuntu Server on the box for me.

Suse 10.2

Filed under
SUSE

Improving touch

Filed under
HowTos

I've sometimes wished that the UNIX touch command had the same -p option as mkdir. With a little bit of scripting, it can:    Full Post Here.

ToPaZ Now! or, The topyli Non-Interface

Filed under
Ubuntu

Project ToPaZ is the collection of blue-sky ideas and more serious plans that people have thought up for the as-of-now mythical Three Point Zero (ToPaZ) release of GNOME. The best part of ToPaZ, however, is the very fact that it doesn't exist. So, we are all allowed to dream up our own vision of what it would be like. So here goes. Presenting the topyli Non-Interface, where people, documents and events are first class objects.

Linux Distro Timeline

Filed under
Linux

The Linux desktop: Dual booting, drivers and printers

Filed under
Interviews

In this interview, van der Linden, SearchOpensource.com's Linux desktop expert, describes how to set up a dual-boot for adding different flavors of Linux to the same laptop and how to make Windows and Linux play well on the same laptop. He also suggests an Internet resource for setting up Linux drivers on a laptop.

Fedora Core 6 Zod LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Out just in time for Christmas from Red Hat is the official Fedora Core 6 i386 LiveCD. Overall this is a very clean and polished LiveCD with some of the best software and advancements found within Fedora 6.

Nuts & Scrap for Linux now available

Filed under
Gaming

Nuts & Scrap is a platform arcade game aimed at the casual gamer, with some touches of a graphical adventure title featuring two fearless robots whose mission is to save the human race. Due to the success of the Win32 and ZetaOS versions, we're now releasing "Nuts & Scrap" for Linux on Intel 32 bits processors.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box

Security Leftovers

  • FBI detects breaches against two state voter systems
    The Federal Bureau of Investigation has found breaches in Illinois and Arizona's voter registration databases and is urging states to increase computer security ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election, according to a U.S. official familiar with the probe. The official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said on Monday that investigators were also seeking evidence of whether other states may have been targeted. The FBI warning in an Aug. 18 flash alert from the agency's Cyber Division did not identify the intruders or the two states targeted. Reuters obtained a copy of the document after Yahoo News first reported the story Monday.
  • Russians Hacked Two U.S. Voter Databases, Say Officials [Ed: blaming without evidence again]
    Two other officials said that U.S. intelligence agencies have not yet concluded that the Russian government is trying to do that, but they are worried about it.
  • FBI Says Foreign Hackers Got Into Election Computers
    We've written probably hundreds of stories on just what a dumb idea electronic voting systems are, highlighting how poorly implemented they are, and how easily hacked. And, yet, despite lots of security experts sounding the alarm over and over again, you still get election officials ridiculously declaring that their own systems are somehow hack proof. And now, along comes the FBI to alert people that it's discovered at least two state election computer systems have been hacked already, and both by foreign entities.
  • Researchers Reveal SDN Security Vulnerability, Propose Solution
    Three Italian researchers have published a paper highlighting a security vulnerability in software-defined networking (SDN) that isn't intrinsic to legacy networks. It's not a showstopper, though, and they propose a solution to protect against it. "It" is a new attack they call Know Your Enemy (KYE), through which the bad guys could potentially collect information about a network, such as security tool configuration data that could, for example, reveal attack detection thresholds for network security scanning tools. Or the collected information could be more general in nature, such as quality-of-service or network virtualization policies.
  • NV Gains Momentum for a Secure DMZ
    When it comes to making the shift to network virtualization (NV) and software-defined networking (SDN), one of the approaches gaining momentum is using virtualization technology to build a secure demilitarized zone (DMZ) in the data center. Historically, there have been two major drawbacks to deploying firewalls as a secure mechanism inside a data center. The first is the impact a physical hardware appliance has on application performance once another network hop gets introduced. The second is the complexity associated with managing the firewall rules. NV technologies make it possible to employ virtual firewalls that can be attached to specific applications and segregate them based on risk. This is the concept of building a secure DMZ in the data center. The end result is that the virtual firewall is not only capable of examining every packet associated with a specific application, but keeping track of what specific firewall rules are associated with a particular application becomes much simpler.