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Friday, 23 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Linux holiday shopping guide Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2014 - 7:12am
Story CompuLab launches Utilite2: Tiny ARM-based Ubuntu/Android PC Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2014 - 7:06am
Story Interview with Esfir Kanievska Rianne Schestowitz 02/12/2014 - 12:33am
Story The Android 5.0 Lollipop Review Rianne Schestowitz 02/12/2014 - 12:19am
Story Manjaro 0.8.11 released! Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 11:53pm
Story Unity 8 Has Received Improvements For Desktop Usage Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 11:43pm
Story Q4OS: Debian Stable with the Trinity Desktop Environment Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 11:25pm
Story Jack And Jill Are Google's New Compilers For Android App Developers Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 11:21pm
Story CoreOS is building a container runtime, Rocket Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 11:18pm
Story 8 ways to contribute to open source without writing code Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 10:16pm

Review: Kubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 6

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Ubuntu For those that haven't using an Ubuntu (and family) Alternate CD, it's a simplistic way to install the distribution to your PC and allows you to setup some extra niceities like Linux Software RAID as well as speeding up the whole process of installing (off the top of my head, by about a quarter).

How to catch Linux system intruders

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HowTos There's no doubt that Linux is a secure operating system. However, nothing is perfect. Millions of lines of code are churned through the kernel every second and it only takes a single programming mistake to open a door into the operating system. If that line of code happens to face the Internet, that's a backdoor to your server.

Software Freedom Day: My Favorite OSS Apps

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members.whattheythink: Today is Software Freedom Day worldwide, and I thought I'd support the effort by noting my favorite products. I use computers in Linux and Windows. Many of the programs are also available for Macintosh.

Is open source politically attractive?

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OSS Matt Asay thinks it funny that Canada’s Green Party has made open source a part of its election manifesto. Given that it is one of the country’s smaller parties, attracting less than 10 percent of the vote, he questions its utility.

Get thin client benefits for free with openThinClient

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Software Thin clients reduce hardware costs, offer added security by stripping away storage options, and ease management tasks by storing all configurations on a centralized server. openThinClient is an open source thin client server that is absolutely free.

Eight Monitors With ATI Linux Graphics

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Software With the most recent Catalyst 8.9 Linux driver release there is support for MultiView on FireGL and FirePRO graphics cards. This allows the user to use multiple graphics cards together in order to build a single X server that spans all of these displays.

BeOS reborn: 30 days with Haiku

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OS Haiku is a free operating system and an alternative to Linux. It celebrated its seventh birthday on 18 August, and it's still being actively developed. Haiku is nowhere near being considered a finished product, but it's now stable enough for everyday use. Most importantly, it's very interesting.

Software Freedom Day is 20 September

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OSS Transparency is key in enabling people to participate in the creation of wealth and well-being in society. In the past decade, free and open source software (FOSS) has become one of the major catalysts in increasing transparency by lowering the barrier to access the best software technologies. Software Freedom Day (SFD) celebrates this important role of FOSS in making this change happen globally.

some howtos:

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  • Short Tip: htop, a top alternative

  • Video - Installing and Uninstalling Adobe AIR and Applications
  • DPKG and APT-GET commands for packages
  • How to view Routing Table and Change your default Gateway
  • How to make Opera 9.5 look native in KDE 4
  • How to add metadata to digital pictures from the command line
  • Virtualization As An Alternative To Dual Booting Part 1
  • How to Properly Setup Samba

today's leftovers

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  • Ubuntu Testing Day

  • Linux, a more powerful competitor for Vista
  • Mandriva Sync in 2009: what’s new, what’s good, what’s not so good
  • Will VMWare go open source without legal pressure?
  • VMware seeks "a skilled Open Source/Linux expert"
  • Schools get free PC virtualization and Novell SUSE
  • Mandriva announces a new solution for netbooks: Mandriva Mini (PR)
  • Ubuntu-Hardy-Gnome: The Review
  • More On Ubuntu's BulletProofX
  • A very minimal desktop
  • Fleshing out XFCE in Ubuntu
  • 5 Google Reader Extensions for Firefox 3 That Are Worth Using
  • Another step closer to Opera 9.60
  • pimp my mythvideo: another navigation patch
  • Aaron Aseigo: Digging in the Dirt
  • Linux Outlaws 55 - Your Shipment of Feedback Has Arrived
  • The *Other* Vista: Successful and Open Source

UserBase Goes Live!

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Web The KDE community is pleased to announce UserBase. UserBase is the new end-user wiki for KDE and complements TechBase, the wiki aimed at developers. It will contain tips and tricks, links to where to get more help, as well as an application catalogue giving an overview of the different kinds of programs that KDE offers.

OpenSUSE 11 - A review of the experience on a ThinkPad T40

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lilserenity.wordpress: Prior to OpenSUSE 11, I was still using Ubuntu 7.10 (and I would have preferred to stay on 7.04 to some respect) with the Gnome desktop environment. I had upgraded to 2.3, and Firefox 3.0 by the end.

Pressure, progress flow at Linux Plumbers Conference

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Linux This week’s Linux Plumbers Conference in Portland was a great opportunity for many of the Linux kernel community people to get together, challenge one another, hash out some differences and hone their similarities and synergies. What strikes me as perhaps most interesting is that while there was some discord felt throughout the event among the different Linux camps, this conglomerate of developers representing a range of different vendors in a variety of different ways all do one thing common to all of them: push the kernel forward.

Free Riders, Canonical and Greg KH

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Linux On Wednesday kernel developer and Novell fellow Greg KH opened the first annual Linux Plumbers Conference with a keynote aimed squarely at the team behind Ubuntu, Canonical. I think Greg could have used the opportunity to inspire more than attack, but Greg obviously feels strongly about the necessity for upstream development. It’s also Greg being Greg: I believe he carries around a spoon just in case he encounters a hornets’ nest.

Giveaway celebrates open source

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OSS Free software is being distributed today at Waikato University to mark Software Freedom Day an annual international celebration of open source software.

Development Release: openSUSE 11.1 Beta 1 Now Available

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The openSUSE Project is happy to announce the first beta release of openSUSE 11.1. openSUSE 11.1 includes quite a few improvements and new features over the 11.0 release, including new versions of KDE, GNOME, the Linux kernel, improved YaST modules, and much more!

Just what is up with PCLinuxOS anyway?

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linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: PClinuxOS is a Linux distribution that gets mentioned quite a bit actually. It often is mentioned in the same breath and at the same table when we discuss the "big boy" or commercially supported distributions, like ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuse, etc...

NVIDIA 177.76 Display Driver

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Software In the fourth NVIDIA Linux driver release in under a month's time, the 177.76 display driver has been released. This too looks like another beta driver with more fixes in store for those with GeForce or Quadro hardware owners.

Linux Foundation opening doors to individual participation

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Linux The nonprofit Linux Foundation (LF), which coordinates an assortment of Linux-oriented standardization efforts and employs key developers such as Linux creator Linus Torvalds, has added to its Web site a gateway toward individual -- as opposed to corporate -- membership.

Asus Eee PC 1000 Plus Ubuntu: Big Power in a Small Package

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Ubuntu ZaReason provided an Asus Eee PC 1000 loaded with Ubuntu Hardy Heron. Basic specs for this unit include a 1.6 GHz Intel Atom processor, 1 GB of memory, a 40 GB Solid State Disk (SSD) drive and a 10-inch screen.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Linux More Popular than Windows in Stack Overflow's 2018 Developer Survey
    Stack Overflow, the largest and most trusted online community for developers, published the results of their annual developer survey, held throughout January 2018. More than 100,000 developers participated in this year's Annual Developer Survey, which included several new topics ranging from ethics in coding to artificial intelligence (AI). The results are finally here and reveal the fact that some technologies and operating systems have become more popular than others in the past year.
  • History of containers
    I’ve researched these dates several times now over the years, in preparation for several talks. So I’m posting it here for my own future reference.
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E03 – The Three Musketeers - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Best Desktop Environment
    Thanks to its stability, performance, feature set and a loyal following, the K Desktop Environment (KDE) won Best Desktop Environment in this year's Linux Journal Readers' Choice Awards.
  • Renata D'Avila: Pushing a commit to a different repo
    My Outreachy internship with Debian is over. I'm still going to write an article about it, to let everyone know what I worked on towards the ending, but I simply didn't have the time yet to sit down and compile all the information.

Software: GTK-VNC, GNOME Shell and More

Devices: Mintbox Mini, NanoNote (Part 3), MV3

  • Mintbox Mini 2: Compact Linux desktop with Apollo Lake quad-core CPU
    The Mintbox Mini 2 is a fanless computer that measures 4.4″ x 3.3″ x 1.3″ and weighs about 12 ounces. It’s powered by a 10W Intel Celeron J3455 quad-core processor.
  • Linux Mint ditches AMD for Intel with new Mintbox Mini 2
    While replacing Windows 10 with a Linux-based operating system is a fairly easy exercise, it shouldn’t be necessary. Look, if you want a computer running Linux, you should be able to buy that. Thankfully you can, as companies like System76 and Dell sell laptops and desktops with Ubuntu or Ubuntu-based operating systems. Another option? Buy a Mintbox! This is a diminutive desktop running Linux Mint — an Ubuntu-based OS. Today, the newest such variant — The Mintbox Mini 2 — makes an appearance. While the new model has several new aspects, the most significant is that the Linux Mint Team has switched from AMD to Intel (the original Mini used an A4-Micro 6400T).
  • Porting L4Re and Fiasco.OC to the Ben NanoNote (Part 3)
    So, we find ourselves in a situation where the compiler is doing the right thing for the code it is generating, but it also notices when the programmer has chosen to do what is now the wrong thing. We must therefore track down these instructions and offer a supported alternative. Previously, we introduced a special configuration setting that might be used to indicate to the compiler when to choose these alternative sequences of instructions: CPU_MIPS32_R1. This gets expanded to CONFIG_CPU_MIPS32_R1 by the build system and it is this identifier that gets used in the program code.
  • Linux Software Enables Advanced Functions on Controllers
    At NPE2018, SISE presents its new generation of multi-zone controllers (MV3). Soon, these controllers will be able to control as many as 336 zones. They are available in five sizes (XS, S, M, L and XL) with three available power cards (2.5 A, 15 A and 30 A). They are adaptable to the packaging, automotive, cosmetics, medical and technical-parts markets.

Linux Foundation: Microsoft Openwashing,, OCP, Kernel Commits Statistics

  • More Tips for Managing a Fast-Growing Open Source Project [Ed: Microsoft has infiltrated the Linux Foundation so deeply and severely that the Foundation now regularly issues openwashing pieces for the company that attacks Linux]
  • improves Kubernetes networking in sixth software release, one of Linux Foundation’s open source projects, has introduced its 18.01 software release with a focus on improving Kubernetes Networking, Istio and cloud native NFV.
  • Bolsters Kubernetes, NFV, and Istio Support With Latest Release
    The Fast Data Project ( released its sixth update since its inception within the Linux Foundation two years ago. While the update list is extensive, most are focused on Kubernetes networking, cloud native network functions virtualization (NFV), and Istio.
  • Linux Foundation, OCP collaborate on open sourcing hardware and software
    The virtualization of network functions has resulted in a disaggregation of hardware and software, increasing interest in open source projects for both layers in return. To feed this interest, the Linux Foundation and Open Compute Project (OCP) recently announced a joint initiative to advance the development of software and hardware-based open source networking. Both organizations have something to offer the other through the collaboration. The Linux Foundation’s OPNFV project integrates OCP as well as other open source software projects into relevant network functions virtualization (NFV) reference architectures. At the same time, OCP offers an open source option for the hardware layer.
  • Kernel Commits with "Fixes" tag
    Over the past 5 years there has been a steady increase in the number of kernel bug fix commits that use the "Fixes" tag.  Kernel developers use this annotation on a commit to reference an older commit that originally introduced the bug, which is obviously very useful for bug tracking purposes. What is interesting is that there has been a steady take-up of developers using this annotation: