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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Pondering FOSS foundations Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:18pm
Story 10+ Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:12pm
Story Corporate Desktop Linux Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:04pm
Story Open-Source Radeon 2D Performance Is Better With Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 5:39pm
Story What if… KDE Started using Client-Side Decorations? Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 5:31pm
Story GNOME: A WEEKEND HACK Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 5:18pm
Story Conky Manager to Fedora Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 7:45am
Story Taiga, a new open source project management tool with focus on usability Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 7:17am
Story Android Wear Gets Its First Big Update Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 7:03am
Story Positive results from Outreach Program for Women Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:58am

Balancing Respect and Diversity

Filed under
Linux

jonobacon.org: Historically, the relationship between Debian and Ubuntu has been strained at times. There are various technical and social reasons behind this discomfort in our relationship, and while there is still work to be done to ensure we are working effectively together, the relationship has most certainly improved in recent years.

Extract Archives on Right-Click in KDE 4

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: In KDE 3, extracting archives, such as zip and tar files, is pretty simple. You just find the relevant file in Konqueror or Dolphin, right-click it and choose Extract for a list of extraction options. For some reason, that functionality hasn’t been copied over to KDE 4.

The End Of the OS As We Know It

Filed under
Software

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: So the bloggers over at ZDNet have once again proclaimed the end of the operating system. Is the OS going away if people primarily use applications via a browser? I use hosted applications via a browser. I use Word Press, Flickr, Google Apps, Gmail, online money management, online banking and so on.

Also: The Future of Computing is the Yugo

BBC Opens Up - Or Does it?

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: The BBC's iPlayer site has been a target of open source community ire since it started. Originally delivering content via Microsoft DRM-protected technologies, a recent announcement from the BBC's Erik Huggers appears to offer some promise of relief:

10 FAQ After one Week on Linux

Filed under
Linux

168hours.wordpress: There are many cases when after looking at some of the FAQ on the web you ask yourself: “Are they for real? Who asks those questions anyway?” On the other hand there are many really helpful FAQ.

China takes lead in Linux education

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Since the Chinese government began supporting domestic open source communities in 2005, hundreds of thousands of young people in the world's most populous country have become a part of the open source world.

Mandriva 2009 Beta 1 & KDE 4.1 - A Brief Report

Mandriva released the 2009 Beta 1 iso's on July 29th. I downloaded the i586 version then. Since then, hundreds of software updates, patches, and fixes have been placed into Mandriva's "Cooker" repositories, Cooker being Mandriva's name for it's development branch.

How are things shaping up for the Mandriva 2009 release? And how's KDE 4.1 working on this new release?

Dogs hide bones, Firefox hides useful tricks

Filed under
Moz/FF

downloadsquad.com: Firefox is one of those applications that's so hard to write about, because there may be little tricks and shortcuts I've been using for some time, and someone will discover one and say, "Hey, that rocks! Why didn't anyone tell me?"

Interesting Improvements In GNOME 2.24

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Earlier this year prior to the release of GNOME 2.22 we had shared eight interesting improvements in GNOME 2.22. Now with the official GNOME 2.24 release due out next month, this time around we're sharing a few of the interesting highlights for this GNOME update.

Pixar's rendering software - big on Linux servers, not Mac

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: A reader of my recent story on Pixar announcing that its popular RenderMan Pro Server software would start to support Windows clusters questioned why I hadn't noted whether or not RenderMan already ran on Mac and Linux server clusters, known as 'render farms' in the animation biz.

Dell's Latitude-On instant OS detailed, screenshooted

Filed under
Linux

engadget.com: Seems the act of waking a sleeping laptop to a full-blown OS is no longer in vogue. We're not sure when this happened though we're pretty sure that ASUS' decision to embed SplashTop into its P5E3 mobo had something to do with it. The benefit, of course, is an extension of battery life to days instead of hours.

Test Driving Zenwalk 5.2 Beta Gnome Edition

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: This was my first ever adventure with a Slakware-based GNU/Linux distribution so I cannot say it has been an easy, effortless task, but that's probably just my lack of experience, because, after I finished the installation and testing of Zenwalk 5.2 Beta Gnome edition, it all made much more sense.

gOS 3 Gadgets (beta) targets Linux beginners and Google Gadgets lovers

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: I first heard of gOS when it was chosen to power the $199 Wal-Mart gPC. The third iteration of the OS, gOS 3.0 "Gadgets" Beta, was released last week. It's a great Web-focused desktop, but it doesn't offer much to experienced or current Ubuntu users.

Also: A video tour of gOS Gadgets 3 (beta)

Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Review: Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

  • First look at Ubuntu Intrepid Alpha 4
  • How to install ubuntu: a painless procedure
  • How to install a package in Ubuntu

ISO's Day of Shame

Filed under
OSS
  • ISO's Day of Shame

  • Not very appealing: ISO/IEC kicks out appeals
  • ISO, IEC reject appeals, approve OOXML spec

The end run around the OS is underway

blogs.zdnet: The operating system may be losing its luster. In fact, you could argue that the operating system–Linux, OS X and Windows–will become an application that just happens to boot first. And hardware vendors are on to the OS’s diminishing importance.

What Comes After the Windows Era?

linuxjournal.com: As a computer journalist for the last 25 years, I've received a lot of review copies of software. As something of an obsessive magpie, I've tended to keep most of it. Until yesterday, that is, when I finally threw out all those copies. What's makes this little spring-cleaning exercise particularly apt as well as cathartic is that all of us - and not just me - may finally be witnessing the end of the Windows era.

Linux community often tapped for beta testing

zdnetasia.com: It is common for the open source community to be called upon by vendors--including proprietary vendors--to be beta testers for Linux releases, according to an industry player.

Powerful graphical tools for Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: Linux has a bad reputation of having to use the Command Line Interface (CLI) to do anything really useful. In this article I will talk about some graphical interfaces for tools to get those "useful" things done.

Will Linux Ever Be a Contender?

Filed under
Linux

geeknewscentral.com: I read an article earlier this week saying that Linux sees a Windows Free world. Well if that's true, I would have to wonder what people would go to, because Linux is not it. At least, not now.

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