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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story screenshots of Desura srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:40am
Story phoronix: nvidia, xorg, ext4, cpuidle srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:38am
Story Adventures in IPv6 srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:35am
Story Re: Control is Highly Overrated and Overpriced srlinuxx 4 09/06/2011 - 2:27am
Story The relationship between CentOS and Redhat srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 10:35pm
Story EBooks are "attacking our freedom" srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 10:33pm
Story Discovering a New World srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 10:30pm
Story Has Linux Missed the IPv6 Day Train? srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 8:43pm
Story FreeNAS 8 review srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 7:42pm
Story Valve and Linux Troubles srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 7:40pm

Real-world Apache Derby: Who needs Ajax, anyway?

Filed under
News

Asynchronous JavaScript + XML (Ajax) is a dynamite technique for greatly enhancing the user experience on the Web. Discover how to structure a simple, database-centric solution that provides a mechanism for collecting responses to questions about SOX compliance.

Ubuntu Linux Free Software and Beryl Beat Vista

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux was founded on the command line. If you look around a little bit and find some of the Linux "old school" guys, you'll find that they tend to shy away from the gui. Linux has really stepped it up a notch visually.

IT in 2006: Google, Linux, Digg, Web-based Apps

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Most of the big tech stories of 2006 have already gotten far too much coverage. Does anyone not know that HP hit a serious bump in the road this year due to its snooping on employees and board members? Other stories – with far more long-term importance – have gotten much less ink.

The Open Source Desktop Myth

Filed under
OSS

Will 2007 be the year of the Free Software desktop? David Chisnall's answer is "probably not, but who cares?" Microsoft won the desktop war; can Free Software win the next one?

Open source to be a driving force in education

Filed under
OSS

Open-source software in schools will be the driving force for Gordon Brown’s proposed ‘Knowledge Economy’, it was claimed today. The claim comes from Bluefountain, after massive cross-party backbench support for a change in government policy for IT in education.

Matt Asay: Drupal founder on Sharepoint (collaboration, not content)

Filed under
Drupal

Dries Buytaert, the founder and maintainer of the excellent web CMS, Drupal, talks today about Sharepoint 2007. He calls it (and its "ilk" of software) "Collaboration Management Software," instead of "Content Management Software." I like that distinction.

Roots access - Genealogy with GRAMPS

Filed under
Software

Genealogy is a burgeoning hobby and to help the home genealogist, a whole range of software is available. Much of it is commercial but here I’ll look at one of the most popular free software options—GRAMPS. Charting your family history needn’t mean compromising on licensing.

Review: VectorLinux 5.8

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

VectorLinux, a lightweight, fast Linux distribution for the x86 platform, just released its new version 5.8 this week. This user-friendly distribution makes the average computer user's life easy by supplying office software, Web browsing, photo editing, and archiving on top of a fast, clean Xfce window manager.

GNOME 2.17.4 Screenshots

Filed under
Software

The GNOME camp has pushed out a new development release in time for the holidays. GNOME 2.17.4 is another test release in the road to GNOME 2.18.0 in March of next year. Many packages were updated from GNOME 2.17.3, so this afternoon we had set out on a GARNOME adventure to capture some new GNOME screenshots to see how GNOME 2.17 is shaping up. Overall it looked quite well except for a few more bugs than normal.

GNOME 2.17.4 Screenshots

Ubuntu Linux 6.06 Christian Edition

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

One of the virtues of Linux is that there's pretty much a version of it for everybody. From regular Ubuntu to Gentoo to Berry Linux to Fedora to Damn Small Linux, there's something out there for virtually all types of Linux users. So I was intrigued to discover that there is a Christian version of the extremely popular Ubuntu Linux distribution.

Linux Desktop 2006: better than ever

Filed under
Linux

I recently read a story that asked, "Has the Desktop Linux Bubble Burst?" Burst!? No, I don't think so. Actually, it still isn't even half as big as it will be when it's full.

Laptops, mobilily and simplicity

Filed under
Linux

A little while ago, I decided that I would never, ever have a desk ever again. I bought a laptop, and after a week I promised I would never, ever buy anything but a laptop and would change my working area in my house. From our latest poll, it's clear that I am not alone. Where does this leave Linux?

Penguins are this winter's hot trend

Filed under
Misc

Forget polar bears. This winter's "it" critter is unquestionably the penguin. America's love affair with penguins stretches from Hollywood to publishing to the Internet.

Today's Howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install KDE Desktop in Ubuntu

  • Webmin Installation and Configuration in Ubuntu Linux
  • Install TrueCrypt on Ubuntu Edgy
  • How to forcefully empty the Trash : Ubuntu
  • Looking Glass for Ubuntu
  • Mount Network File systems (NFS,Samba) in Ubuntu
  • Setting up a server for PXE network booting

Defense Lawyer Attacks DNA Evidence in Hans Reiser Case

Filed under
Reiser

The defense lawyer for Oakland computer programmer Hans Reiser tried to raise doubts today about DNA evidence that prosecutors believe connects him to the death of his wife Nina Reiser, who was last seen alive Sept. 3.

Finding the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Linux desktops should receive general market acceptance. But they don't. The reason: The tyranny of the installed base, among other things.

New NVIDIA Linux Display Driver

Filed under
Software

Version: 1.0-9746
Release Date: December 21, 2006

Release Highlights:

  • Added support for GeForce 8800 GTS and GeForce 8800 GTX boards.

Downloads

Linux Migrations Made Simpler

Filed under
Linux

Running a Microsoft Windows NT server these days is a brave (or, perhaps, stupid) thing to do: Support for the product has finished, and as far as Microsoft is concerned, the product should be put in a rest home for retired software. There are many reasons to consider migrating some or all of your data center servers to Linux, and we won't go into them here. But if you do decide to go open source, some ways of going about it are better than others.

Browsing, Open Source and Litigious Affairs

Internetnews.com wades through the top stories and issues that rocked the industry in 2006 in this ongoing series.

Red Hat: Earnings up, customers in, competitors out

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat knocked the ball out of the park again this quarter, especially in light of the competitive pressures from Microsoft/Novell and Oracle. I joined in the earnings call today, and was very impressed.

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More in Tux Machines

How Google Does Open Source

Marc Merlin has been working as an engineer at Google since 2002 and has seen (and done) a lot of open source and Linux work during that time. Speaking at the LinuxCon North America event this week, Merlin provided a standing room only audience with an overview how Google uses and contributes to open source. "Google wouldn't be around today without open source software," Merlin said. Read more

High-end music player has a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian inside

Bryston has launched a high-end, compact “BDP-π” digital music player built on a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian, plus a HifiBerry “Digi+” audio HAT add-on. Bryston’s new Raspberry Pi-based BDP-π digital music player costs a hefty $1,295. Yet that’s less than half the cost of the highly acclaimed Bryston BDP-2 player, while offering many of these same features and much of the same high-end sound quality. The BDP-π is faster and more capable than the BDP-1, says the company. Read more

Leftovers: Gaming (Mighty No. 9 and Wine)

  • “Mighty No. 9” Mac & Linux Versions Released on Steam
    The creators of the Kickstarter-funded video game, Mighty No. 9, announced on Thursday they released the Mac and Linux versions of the game. This announcement comes just a little over two months after the game was delivered to North American and Asian backers via PS4, Xbox One, and PC. The team revealed that both Mac and Linux versions are now available on Steam.
  • Mac and Linux Versions of Mighty No. 9 Released
  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.4 Is Now Available
    The Wine team released today fifth stable release of 1.8 branch of Wine. Version 1.8.4 has many small changes including 50 bugfixes. This stable release contains bugfixes, new cards were added to GPU description table, new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

Android Leftovers

  • iPhones are much more likely to 'fail' than Androids
    Apple's once glittering reputation for quality took quite a few hits during the last few years, especially when it comes to iOS, the software that runs on iPhones. In some cases, recurrent software bugs have plagued users with issues such as the inability to use Wi-Fi, frequent crashes, and ridiculously short battery life. This week reports surfaced about a hardware flaw that makes some iPhone 6 screens inoperable. (Apple hasn't confirmed any related problems.) It's hard to tell how widespread some of these issues are, but a new report from a company that monitors smartphone quality suggests iPhones are far more likely to "fail" or suffer serious glitches than Android phones. The Blancco Technology Group says it collected performance data from millions of mobile phones during the second quarter of 2016, and it found that iPhones had an overall failure rate of 58 percent, compared to just 35 percent failure for Android devices. The term "failure" doesn’t necessarily mean that the phone has become a brick, according to Blancco. Instead, it means the device or software running on the device suffered some serious problem.
  • Maru OS is now open source (Turns Android phones into Linux desktops)
    Maru OS is a software project that lets you plug an Android phone into an external display to run desktop Linux software. First unveiled earlier this year, the software is very much a work-in-progress. Initially it only supported one phone: the Google Nexus 5. But things could get a lot more interesting soon, because the developer behind Maru OS has finished open sourcing the project and a group of developers are planning to start porting the software to run on additional devices.
  • Maru OS wants to turn your phone into a desktop with its latest open source build
    Not to be confused with Maru the adorable YouTube cat, Maru OS, the bite-sized Android add-on that turns your phone into a desktop, just went open source. Maru OS doesn’t change much about the way your phone operates on its own, but once you connect a desktop monitor via a slimport cable, Maru really comes to life. When connected to a display, Maru OS allows you to run a desktop Linux environment straight from your phone. Your phone is still a phone, it’ll take calls, send texts and do everything else it normally does, even while it’s connected to a desktop monitor running Linux on the side. It’s an interesting concept, but it’s still very much a work in progress. Today’s announcement could help move things along for Maru.