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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story there is no kde5 srlinuxx 06/06/2011 - 11:39pm
Story Give Unity A Chance srlinuxx 1 06/06/2011 - 11:38pm
Story Ubuntu 11.04 Unity Tips and Tricks srlinuxx 06/06/2011 - 11:38pm
Story Download of the Week: The Clockwork Man srlinuxx 06/06/2011 - 11:34pm
Story Open-Source Software Winning Mainstream Status in Enterprises srlinuxx 06/06/2011 - 8:10pm
Story Sapphire Radeon HD 6770 srlinuxx 06/06/2011 - 8:06pm
Story Novell's open source legacy – wake up, little SUSE srlinuxx 06/06/2011 - 6:32pm
Story Ready for Firefox 6? Here's What's on the Way srlinuxx 06/06/2011 - 6:29pm
Story Mageia 1 – A new distro and a new DE experience for me. srlinuxx 06/06/2011 - 6:28pm
Story Attention: This is not big news srlinuxx 06/06/2011 - 6:26pm

Activism and Promotion

Filed under
OSS

Something that is really counterproductive in many Open Source communities are people who are so rabidly fanatical about one line of thinking that they try to pressure everyone into their line of thinking.

Book review: How Linux Works

Filed under
Reviews

Ok, so you are a Linux user or a power user. The question then is what does it take to become a valid, omnipotent, root-enabled superuser? One potential answer is read the book How Linux Works, by Brian Ward and published by No Starch Press, by the last word of the last chapter you may or may not have been transformed, a wizard waiting to be born.

Jeremy Allison Has Resigned from Novell to Protest MS Patent Deal

Filed under
SUSE

The legendary Jeremy Allison (of Samba fame) has resigned from Novell in protest over the Microsoft-Novell patent agreement, which he calls "a mistake" which will be "damaging to Novell's success in the future."

digiKam Lets You Take Your Tags With You

Filed under
Software

I'm a digiKam user and overall I've been happy with it, but I've always wanted tagging to be applied to the picture itself and not just the digiKam database. So when I saw that digiKam 0.9 was recently released I hurried over to check out the new features.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Fix Firefox Backspace to Take You to the Previous Page

  • Installing Popular Applications On Your Ubuntu Desktop With Automatix2
  • Blogging from GNOME with Drivel : Ubuntu
  • Mount and Unmout ISO images without burning them
  • Rescuing a system with massively broken filesystem permissions
  • Install ImageMagick 5.5.7 on Debian
  • Backing up your system with free software
  • Linux-Windows Single Sign-On

How To Compile A Kernel - The Debian (Sarge) Way

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on Debian Sarge systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.

Network Bandwidth Monitoring Tools

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos

This is list of Network Bandwidth Monitoring Tools for Ubuntu Users includes bmon bwbar,bwm,bwm-ng,iftop,iperf,ipfm speedometer, cbm, ibmonitor, pktstat, mactrack, MRTG, Cacti. This tutorial also contains how to install and configure each tool with examples and screenshots.This is very useful for all Linux users and admins.

Read Full article here

Installing openSUSE 10.2 on a Compaq laptop (Part 2)

Filed under
Reviews

In part 1, openSUSE got installed and configured on a Compaq Presario V2000 with an ATI Radeon Xpress 200M PCIE graphics chipset and a 32-bit CPU. Now it's time to go for the bling.

openSUSE 10.2: The Most Complete List of Repositories

Filed under
SUSE

Here is the most complete list of repositories that you can ever-ever find on this planet, Earth, for your openSUSE 10.2 Linux. If you do manage to find few more, just holla Smile

DNA found to be Nina Reiser's, forensic expert testifies today

Filed under
Reiser

A expert in forensic investigations testified Wednesday that there is almost no chance blood lifted from a pillar in Hans Reiser's home and blood on a sleeping bag stuff sack found in his car is not that of his estranged wife Nina Reiser.

Supergamer2 ISO Available

Filed under
Linux

Darin has written to announce an updated Supergamer iso. If you'll recall, Supergamer is a wonderful system based on PCLOS that offers unlimited gaming pleasure all at the boot of a cd. Download the torrent and help seed Supergamer2!

Java Project Looking Glass 1.0 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Project Looking Glass has reached version 1.0! For the uninformed, Project Looking Glass is an open-source 3D desktop environment for not only Linux but also Solaris and Windows. This software is all powered by Java after three years in development. Curious to see what Project Looking Glass looks like in action, as well as some of their Java 3D applications? We have an arsenal of images to demonstrate this software as we run it on Fedora Rawhide FC7.

Java Project Looking Glass 1.0 Screenshots

The Battle for Wireless Network Drivers

Filed under
Interviews

BSD and Linux programmers have had a lot of success in creating drivers for new computer hardware in a timely manner, but much of their effort has been without the support of major hardware manufacturers. Intel, Marvell, Texas Instruments and Broadcom, though separate and competing entities, seem by one consent to prevent non-Microsoft operating systems from working properly with some of their most widely-used network chips. To find out more about this situation, I interviewed representatives from network chip manufacturers and programmers from free software operating systems.

Sabayon Linux Interview

Filed under
Interviews

I have recently interviewed Cvill 64 from Sabayon Linux. I posted the article before but it didn't reach a broad public. I think it's a shame to let it go to waste so if you haven't read it you can get a second chance here .

Why Linux has Zealots

Filed under
Linux

So, why the zealotry? It's hard for the non-geek population to wrap their minds around the zealot factor. It's just a computer, isn't it? Why all the fuss? We geeks know how we are. We take a simple thing like playing a song and turn it into an anti-DRM crusade. Show us an RFID chip and we set off into a rant about rights to privacy. Write a web page for IE-only and watch the indignant geeks line up to decry the injustice. Are we really serious, or are we just putting everybody on? Is it really so important to spread Linux? What do we have against proprietary software?

Finding Hardware Details of your Linux Machine without Using Screw Driver

Filed under
HowTos

Many new Linux users have trouble determining the true specs of their Linux machine from command line. So in this quick guide we will learn how to find specs of your Linux machine from command line. By the end of this guide you will be able to obtain full inventory of all components on your Linux machine within minutes. This should also help you in finding correct drivers and support for your hardware’s chipset.

A first look at Thunderbird 2.0

Filed under
Moz/FF
Reviews

After many months of development, Thunderbird 2.0 is almost ready to debut. The Mozilla Foundation released the first beta of Thunderbird 2.0 last week, and I've been using it to manage my mail since then. The new release boasts tagging, history navigation, new mail alerts, improved extension support, and a number of other features. Thunderbird 2.0 won't knock your socks off with exciting new features, but it's a nice, gradual improvement over the Thunderbird 1.5 series.

Novell and Microsoft share customers

Filed under
SUSE

The news today out of Walmond (Waltham/Redmond) is that some marquee customers are buying into the Microsoft-Novell deal. Specifically, AIG, Credit Suisse, and Deutsche Bank are all on the record as being happy "new" customers.

The year in Linux, 2006

Filed under
Linux

The year in Linux 2006 came in with a “March of the Penguins,” and is going out with “Happy Feet.” In between, the Linux and open source industry saw major changes. Here is a summary of the big Linux stories of 2006, and some others you may have missed.

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More in Tux Machines

Conferences and Kids

I've taken my daughter, now 13, to FOSDEM in Brussels every year that I had slots there. She isn't a geek, yet enjoys the crowds and the freebies. When I could, I also took my kids to other events, where I was speaking. In this post I'd like to capture my feelings about why children should be part of conferences, and what conferences can do to make this easier. First off, the "why?" Traditional conferences (in all domains, not just software) are boring, ritualized events where the participants compete to see who can send the most people to sleep at once. The real event starts later, over alcohol. It is a strictly adult affair, and what happens at the conf stays at the conf. Now our business is a little different. It is far more participative. Despite our history of finicky magic technologies that seem to attract mainly male brains, we strive for diversity, openness, broad tolerance. Most of what we learn and teach comes through informal channels. Finished is formal education, elitism, and formal credentials. We are smashing the barriers of distance, wealth, background, gender, and age. Read more

50 Essential Linux Applications

If you’re a refugee from Windows, you may be finding the Linux world slightly confusing, wondering how you can get the all same functionality you had in Windows, but still enjoy the freedom that Linux offers. Never fear! Linux is not some scary, difficult to use monster that’s only used by hackers and programmers, it’s actually becoming more and more user friendly every day. Read
more

today's leftovers

  • Debugging gnome-session problems on Ubuntu 14.04
  • Introducing snapd-glib
  • An awesome experience!
    GUADEC has been a week full of memorable moments. As my friend Rares mentioned in his post, our newcomers group was welcomed by friendly community members right as we arrived at the hotel. For someone who has never attended a similar event before, this really helped with getting into the conference atmosphere. In the first couple days of the conference, I found myself meeting a lot of people that I knew from IRC. It felt really nice to finally know the person behind the internet nick. I was especially excited about getting to meet my mentor, Carlos Soriano =). In between the presentations I also took the time to prepare my own lightning talk about compressed files in Nautilus. Speaking in front of the GNOME community for the first time was a unique experience.
  • Commvault Announces Support of Red Hat Virtualization 4 with Commvault Software
  • Modularity Infrastructure Design
    The purpose of our Modularity initiative is to support the building, maintaining, and shipping of modular things. So, in order to ensure these three requirements are met, we need to design a framework for building and composing the distribution. In terms of the framework, in general, we are concerned about the possibility of creating an exponential number of component combinations with independent lifecycles. That is, when the number of component combinations becomes too large, we will not be able to manage them. So that we don’t accidentally make our lives worse, we must limit the number of supported modules with a policy and provide infrastructure automation to reduce the amount of manual work required.
  • more, less, and a story of typical Unix fossilization
    In the beginning, by which we mean V7, Unix didn't have a pager at all. That was okay; Unix wasn't very visual in those days, partly because it was still sort of the era of the hard copy terminal. Then along came Berkeley and BSD. People at Berkeley were into CRT terminals, and so BSD Unix gave us things like vi and the first pager program, more (which showed up quite early, in 3BSD, although this isn't as early as vi, which appears in 2BSD). Calling a pager more is a little bit odd but it's a Unix type of name and from the beginning more prompted you with '--More--' at the bottom of the screen. All of the Unix vendors that based their work on BSD Unix (like Sun and DEC) naturally shipped versions of more along with the rest of the BSD programs, and so more spread around the BSD side of things. However, more was by no means the best pager ever; as you might expect, it was actually a bit primitive and lacking in features. So fairly early on Mark Nudelman wrote a pager with somewhat more features and it wound up being called less as somewhat of a joke. When less was distributed via Usenet's net.sources in 1985 it became immediately popular, as everyone could see that it was clearly nicer than more, and pretty soon it was reasonably ubiquitous on Unix machines (or at least ones that had some degree of access to stuff from Usenet). In 4.3 BSD, more itself picked up the 'page backwards' feature that had motived Mark Nudelman to write less, cf the 4.3BSD manpage, but this wasn't the only attraction of less. And this is where we get into Unix fossilization.
  • PNScan Linux Trojan Resurfaces with New Attacks Targeting Routers in India
    A trojan thought to have died out resurfaced with new attacks and a new and improved version, launching new attacks on routers running Linux-based firmware located in India's cyber-space.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • 4 tips for teaching kids how to build electronics
    Kids are naturally curious about how things work, and with a new trend in hardware companies creating open source hardware products, it's a great time to teach kids about electronics. But modern technology can seem too complex to even begin to understand. So where do you start?
  • Oil companies joining open source world by sharing data [Ed: No, oil companies, sharing data is open data and not open source. More openwashing, like greenwashing]
    The oil and gas industry has long collected huge volumes of data, but it hasn’t always known quite what to do with it all. Often, the terabytes aren’t even stored on computer systems that readily talk to each other. Industry insiders are used to it, said Michael Jones, senior director of strategy at the oil and gas software maker Landmark. But it’s not OK, he said. So, about a year ago, Jones and some of his oil industry colleagues set about to fix it. This week, at Landmark’s Innovation Forum & Expo at the Westin hotel in northwest Houston, the company unveiled the beginnings of a collaborative its members called groundbreaking. In a move to drive technology further, faster — and, perhaps, take a bigger piece of the burgeoning big-data market — Landmark is pushing its main computing platform into the cloud, for all to use.
  • Interactive, open source visualizations of nocturnal bird migrations in near real-time
    New flow visualizations using data from weather radar networks depict nocturnal bird migrations, according to a study published August 24, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Judy Shamoun-Baranes from University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues.
  • Go! Speed Racer Go!
    I finally reached a point where I could start running the go version of sm-photo-tool. I finished the option validation for the list command. While I was testing it I noticed how much faster the Go version felt. Here are the python vs Go versions of the commands.
  • Semantic Interoperability for European Public Services will be presented at the SEMANTiCS 2016 conference
    The revision of the European Interoperability Framework and the importance of data and information standardisation for promoting semantic interoperability for European Public Services will be presented by Dr. Vassilios Peristeras, DG Informatics, ISA unit at the SEMANTiCS 2016 conference which takes place in Leipzig on September 13th and 14th 2016. The title of the presentation is “Promoting Semantic Interoperability for European Public Services: the European Commission ISA2 Programme” (slideset to appear here soon).