Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 21 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

USDA Keeps Up with the Flow

Filed under
Software

eWeek: The agency turns to NetBeans, other open-source tools to project the water supply.

Alienware m5550 Notebook Computer Review

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

CyberNet: I’ve been wanting to get into reviewing computer hardware, but I wasn’t quite sure where to start. Finally I decided on laptops, and while there are some great sites out there that review them, none of the reviewers use them for an extended period of time. Their reviews are typically based off of performance and first impressions, but what about other things that are important such as how long the battery lasts while watching a movie or how scratch-resistant the case is?

GtkBuilder has landed!

Filed under
OLPC

Johan Dahlin: Today, after more than 2 years and 120 comments I could finally close #172535, adding support for loading interfaces created by UI designers in Gtk+.

Also: The OLPC project and competition

No negotiations with Microsoft in progress

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth: There’s a rumour circulating that Ubuntu is in discussions with Microsoft aimed at an agreement along the lines they have concluded recently with Linspire, Xandros, Novell etc. For the record, let me state my position.

Starting an appliction on login with Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Pie Palace: My desktop is an Ubuntu install. I want my instant messaging client to start automagically when I login. It doesn't make sense to use /etc/init.d to start it, because I want the app to be run as my user, and I want it to start with my windowing session. How does one do this with Ubuntu?

OpenBSD: Free As In Air

Filed under
BSD

kernelTRAP: "OpenBSD is free as in air," Theo de Raadt stated in a recent thread on the OpenBSD -misc mailing list. The discussion began with a note that the Open Sound System had recently been "open sourced" under the GPLv2 and CDDL leading Theo to comment.

Linux for the kids

Filed under
Linux

banksnetworking blog: There’s the old favorite saying, “Give a man a fish and he’ll eat for a day. Teach him to fish and he’ll eat for the rest of his life.” Let’s focus on a little teaching to fish for a minute.

A brief introduction to xen-tools

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: It is no secret that I'm a big fan of the open source Xen virtual machine hypervisor, and I've written several tools to make using it under Debian GNU/Linux more straightforward. Here we'll take a quick look at using xen-tools to easily create new Xen guest domains.

Quick Tip: Turn on/off Firefox Go Button

Filed under
HowTos

the how-to-geek: The "Go" button in Firefox is rarely used and takes up space on the screen, although not all that much. If you want, you can easily disable it to give your address bar more room.

KIO - the killer app for KDE

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: I am a KDE user, if you haven’t already guessed and today I thought I would share what really sells KDE for me and makes me use KDE as my desktop environment. The killer feature that keeps me with KDE is a technology called KIO.

Word Processor Review

Filed under
Software

donationcoder: Welcome to the DonationCoder comprehensive review of Modern Word Processors. In part one we look at the majors players; in part two we try out the second-tier contenders; part three examines the online word processors challenging the desktop heavy hitters.

Manhattan Project Scientist Dies

Filed under
Obits

AP via Physorg: Samuel Isaac Weissman, a professor and chemist who helped develop the first atomic bomb as part of the Manhattan Project, has died, his wife said Friday. He was 94.

Add Linux Repositories for Point-and-Click Updates

Filed under
HowTos

Maximum PC: Ubuntu isn't the only Linux distribution offering easy automatic updates. It just does the best job of making them accessible. But if you take a few moments to add third-party repositories to your existing Linux install, you can get the same access to software, codecs, and OS updates, even if they're not part of your OS's default configuration. Here's how.

Mozilla Rewriting A Lot Of Code For Upcoming Firefox V3

Filed under
Moz/FF

Information Week: Mozilla programmers are touching most of the software components to increase performance, make the code base more modular and deal with new security threats.

Also: Safari: Do we really need another Web browser?

Linux Community Looks Past Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

Information Week: At the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit, developers discussed the evolution of the operating system--and tried to shrug off the patent threat.

Linux Stocks Are Riding the Open-Source Comeback

Filed under
Linux

Smart Money: WE'VE WITNESSED SOME mythic events in tech history recently. One eye-popper was Steve Jobs and Bill Gates sharing a stage for the first time in 20 years at The Wall Street Journal's D: All Things Digital conference last month. Perhaps even more shocking than that is Microsoft's willingness — reluctant as it may be — to share a stage with the Linux community.

Feature by feature: Firefox vs. Safari

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Links: Safari for Windows was no doubt the topic of the week. There is so much to look and try in a web browser that I decided to compile this comparative table highlighting pros and cons of each browser.

Mark Shuttleworth on Ubuntu and Microsoft -- he's not signing anything

Filed under
Ubuntu

Click: Buried deep in his blog, Canonical head Mark Shuttleworth discusses his position on the whole Microsoft "intellectual property" claim regarding Linux and open-source software and what, as the man behind Ubuntu, he's comfortable and not comfortable doing with Microsoft.

Here comes HTML5! Duck!

Filed under
Web

Penguin Pete: Just when we were all getting so snug and cozy in our Web 2.0 world, along comes the new HTML spec. And it's a dilly!

Evidence of 'Counterattack' Lacking as Linux Conference Convenes

Filed under
Linux

betanews: Yesterday, Reuters scored an aggregation coup by pairing "Linux" and "Microsoft" with the verb "counterattack," resulting in a story that rocketed to the top of the hit list without a beat or a melody to it, and whose inaccurate derivatives were snatched up even by local television.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

Red Hat Financial News

Wine 2.0 RC6 released