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Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Reference for Ubuntu Starters

Filed under
Ubuntu

yabblog.com: Synaptic? deb? sudo? apt? Damn! I still remember when I first installed Ubuntu. Here, I will be posting a reference about Ubuntu things! And to end with top 5 Ubuntu resources on web for Ubuntu starters.

Linux Is Making Me Insane

Filed under
Ubuntu

thebigmoney.com: I installed Ubuntu after being repeatedly challenged by a small but vocal group of readers to look beyond my comfort zone. Whenever I write about the relative differences between Apple and Microsoft-based machines, I invariably get comments from people who are irritated that I didn't mention Ubuntu as an alternative.

10 Cool and Funny Firefox Video Ads

Filed under
Moz/FF

junauza.com: Firefox is the only web browser in the world that has tons of enthusiastic followers. I've seen desktop wallpapers, icons, t-shirts, graffiti, and even tattoos that are dedicated to Firefox. But it didn't stop there. Just recently, I saw some videos on YouTube that promotes the use of Firefox.

Java and Linux on the Android - Almost the Perfect Match?

Filed under
Misc

steamingopencup.blogspot: As this blogspot's subtitle states, you'll be reading more about Java and Linux here (aside from physics) than anything else, and I was hoping I'd have the opportunity to write a post that would talk about both of them under the same spotlight. Tonight, I was given that opportunity.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ask Linux.com: Missing memory, built-in webcams, and shared servers

  • How to Install OpenOffice.org 3.0 in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Turn on Font Autohinting
  • Linux Tips: run fsck on a loopback filesystem
  • How to Install And Configure FUPPES on Ubuntu Hardy
  • Fun with Linux Commands-II
  • Sabayon-Funtoo Linux - Howto
  • Multiple Desktop Wallpapers in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Script for adding new users

7 Fantastic Internet Hoaxes

Filed under
Web

informationweek.com: Despite our increasing technological sophistication, we can't help falling for email about Bigfoot, giant mutant cats, doomed tourists, and deadly butt spiders. Admit it. Even you, a savvy veteran e-mail user, have fallen for one or more of these Internet rumors.

A chat with John Lilly, Mozilla CEO

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: John was the Mozilla Corporation Chief Operating Officer for the last few years, and in January this year, he took the high responsibility of succeeding Mitchell Baker as the head of the maker of Firefox.

Open Source - Bundling benefits together

Filed under
OSS

brajeshwar.com: It is of utmost importance to rule out the notion that Linux is “the latest thing” and a “prime money saver”, but stress on the fact that application in real business to streamline the operations is of more significance.

3 Classic First-Person Shooter Games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

tuxarena.blogspot: A true classic and one of the most played online first-person shooter games, Wolfenstein: ET was supposed to be released as a new mod for Return to Castle Wolfenstein, but the single-player part of the game was abandoned and it was released at no cost, as a standalone multiplayer game.

Review : Ubuntu 8.10 "Intrepid Ibex"

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxondesktop.blogspot: One of the first things you would notice after booting into Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop , is the new improved Human theme which has got a tinge of Orange. Status bar,Buttons glow and few icons have been changed.

Fedora 10 - A Detailed Discussion on 13 Prime Features

Filed under
Linux

blog.taragana.com: With the success of Fedora in Linux distributions, Fedora 10 is perhaps the most anticipated operating system from their library. A faster and advanced distribution is what is proposed by them. Fedora 10, codenamed Cambridge, is set for release on November 25, 2008.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.28 - Part 4: Improved graphics support

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Two collections of patches (1, 2) proposed by the maintainer of the Direct Rendering Infrastructure (DRI) have incorporated numerous graphics hardware support improvements into the main development branch. This is the development branch which will produce Linux version 2.6.28 at the end of this year or at the beginning of next year.

Also: Linux 2.6.28-rc1 Kernel Released

GNOME usability hackfest

Filed under
Software

Mark Shuttleworth: The GNOME user experience hackfest in Boston was a great way to spend the worst week in Wall St history!

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 43

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #43 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: openSUSE Build Service Webclient Survey Started, Development Release: openSUSE 11.1 Beta 3 Now Available, and People of openSUSE: Henne Vogelsang.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • It’s official - my wife likes Ubuntu, too

  • Ohio Linuxfest 2008
  • A $15 USB 802.11g WiFi Adapter For Linux
  • OSS Gaming: Ready for the Big Leagues?
  • Minimal Firefox
  • Paludis is about Choices
  • At Mozilla, blowing the lid off security practices
  • Some open source FUD is too lame to deserve a response
  • 3 Ways to Find Pages Fast with Firefox 3
  • Unix - What Is It? More Linux/Unix Humor
  • Firefox Themes: The Contention Between Visual Hierarchy and Toolbar Customization
  • Gmail gets cute with animated emoticons
  • Dell first TV ad all about Linux
  • Mandriva 2009 InstallFest, and what I’ve been doing lately
  • Open source looks to catch the falling knife
  • Mandriva 2009
  • Netbooks: Interview with Jon Ramvi of the Ubuntu Eee Project

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Configure WiFi and Webcam in a Dell Inspiron 1525 for Hardy

  • Bash For Loop Examples
  • Check your disks' health with GSmartControl
  • KDE 4: Hiding of Task Bar is now Part of openSUSE 11.1
  • Debian Upgrade: GNU/Linux 4.0 Update 5 Available
  • Command not found - openSUSE 11.1 preview
  • Applied regular expressions in PHP: Provisioning the Linksys PAP2T
  • Troubleshooting Ubuntu Post-Installation Configuration Problems
  • Linux Tips: force fsck run during the next reboot
  • Update passwords in batch mode Using chpasswd

Sapphire Radeon HD 4550 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: The graphics cards introduced up to this point though haven't exactly been cheap, but ATI has now introduced their low-end graphics cards for the Radeon HD 4000 series. With Sapphire being a key ATI partner, they have of course introduced news models accordingly. What we have our hands on today is the Sapphire Radeon HD 4550 512MB, which is a PCI Express graphics card that retails for a mere $50~60 USD.

5 Wallpaper Changer Apps For Linux

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: In Linux, setting an image as the desktop wallpaper is not a difficult task, but getting it to change automatically at a certain interval is. Here are 5 wallpaper changers that you can use in your Linux machine.

Linux incognito part two: Windows XP

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: For an awful lot of people their first encounter with a computer will invariably be Microsoft Windows. This straight away creates a barrier against considering alternate operating systems because they look different to what the user has been accustomed to. Here's how to paint a Windows facade over Linux and remove that obstacle.

Everything is (and should be) a file

Filed under
Linux

oneandoneis2.org: I installed Linux on somebody's laptop recently. I installed Ubuntu, in fact. And I was going to give a quick explanation of some of the differences. I was going to start with the "everything is a file that forms part of the one, single filesystem" thing. Then I stopped.

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More in Tux Machines

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!

today's howtos

FOSS Events in Europe: Rust, foss-north, KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018

  • Rust loves GNOME Hackfest: Day 1
    This is a report of the first day of the Rust loves GNOME Hackfest that we are having in Madrid at the moment. During the first day we had a round of introductions and starting outlining the state of the art.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 1
    I'm in Madrid since Monday, at the third GNOME+Rust hackfest! The OpenShine folks are kindly letting us use their offices, on the seventh floor of a building by the Cuatro Caminos roundabout. I am very, very thankful that this time everyone seems to be working on developing gnome-class. It's a difficult project for me, and more brainpower is definitely welcome — all the indirection, type conversion, GObject obscurity, and procedural macro shenanigans definitely take a toll on oneself.
  • Five days left
    I use to joke that the last week before foss-north is the worst – everything is done, all that is left is the stress.
  • KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s flagship conference will be taking place in Copenhagen from May 2-4. It will cover Kubernetes, Prometheus OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, and other key technologies in cloud native computing.

Programming: Taxonomy of Tech Debt, Python and More

  • A Taxonomy of Tech Debt
    Hi there. I’m Bill “LtRandolph” Clark, and I’m the engineering manager for the Champions team on LoL. I’ve worked on several different teams on League over the past years, but one focus has been consistent: I’m obsessed with tech debt. I want to find it, I want to understand it, and where possible, I want to fix it. When engineers talk about any existing piece of technology - for example League of Legends patch 8.4 - we often talk about tech debt. I define tech debt as code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Countless blog posts, articles, and definitions have been written about this scourge of software development. This post will focus on types of tech debt I’ve seen during my time working at Riot, and a model for discussing it that we’re starting to use internally. If you only take away one lesson from this article, I hope you remember the “contagion” metric discussed below.
  • 6 Python datetime libraries
    Once upon a time, one of us (Lacey) had spent more than an hour staring at the table in the Python docs that describes date and time formatting strings. I was having a hard time understanding one specific piece of the puzzle as I was trying to write the code to translate a datetime string from an API into a Python datetime object, so I asked for help.
  • Getting started with Anaconda Python for data science
  • How to install the Moodle learning management system
  • Anatomy of a JavaScript Error
  • Is DevOps compatible with part-time community teams?