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Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story October 2011 Issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine srlinuxx 07/10/2011 - 6:50pm
Story Opening the Door to Innovation srlinuxx 07/10/2011 - 3:58pm
Story Windows to Linux Considerations srlinuxx 07/10/2011 - 3:57pm
Story Time zone database axed by astrology srlinuxx 07/10/2011 - 3:55pm
Story ArchBang Is Lightweight & Always Up To Date srlinuxx 06/10/2011 - 8:58pm
Story Mageia 1 review - Confusing srlinuxx 06/10/2011 - 8:56pm
Story LibreOffice – a dive into the unknown srlinuxx 06/10/2011 - 8:55pm
Story F17 Might Be The Beefy Miracle To The Precise Pangolin srlinuxx 06/10/2011 - 7:46pm
Story Linux is a Hot Topic in Philippines srlinuxx 06/10/2011 - 6:45pm
Story 20 ways to break Linux srlinuxx 06/10/2011 - 6:43pm

Novell loses another Samba team member

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A reliable Novell source has sent me Samba team member Guenther Deschner's farewell email to Novell staff and a follow-up from Lars Mueller, another Samba core team member.

Of course Deschner left over Novell's agreement with Microsoft and the bad-faith actions that Novell has taken regarding its GPL-licensed software in connection with that agreement.

Installing Ubuntu - So easy, I may be about to join the darkside

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The other day i thought I'd give linux a shot. so I went along to the ubuntu page ( and clicked download. downloaded the iso for 6.10 that went pretty quickly - while I was doing other bits and pieces on the web, and it took a grand total of about 45 minutes.

The Road to KDE 4: Amarok 2 Development is Underway

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This week we'll take a brief look at some of the many features that are making their way into Amarok 2, which is the development branch for Amarok in KDE 4.The features discussed are all in progress features which have reached varying stages of completion. Read on for information about Amarok's engines (including Phonon), UI changes, changes to the Magnatune music store, OS X support, and more.


Review of Damn Small Linux 3.2

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Damn Small Linux (DSL) is based on KNOPPIX, so anyone who has used KNOPPIX or Debian in the past will feel right at home. The entire system is around 50MB so it will fit on small, business-card CD-R's and cheap USB memory sticks. DSL is a live CD, meaning it will run completely from a CD without having to install it to your hard drive.

No OSS Graphic Drivers - Who Has The Better Answer?

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In April of last year CNET published an article entitled New Linux look fuels old debate (this is also an article where I was consulted). Andrew Fear, who is NVIDIA's software product manager, had stated NVIDIA's public reasons why they do not open-source their Linux display drivers.

Andrew Fear (NVIDIA):

Dealing with Runaway Processes

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Have you ever been using your Linux distro and suddenly found a program won’t close? It’s frustrating when an application hangs. In Windows, one could right click on the taskbar and choose “Task Manager” and kill the hanging process (which doesn’t always work BTW). In Linux, you can also kill these hanging processes.

Installing ATI driver in Open SUSE 10.2

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You might have read my previous post on my experience moving from Kubuntu to OpenSuSe. I had to google to find out how to install the ATI driver for my ATI Mobility Radeon X1600 card. I did the driver installation thrice. Here are the steps to install the driver in Open SuSe 10.2.

NVIDIA Releases Gelato 2.1 - Film Quality Rendering Software

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NVIDIA has released NVIDIA® Gelato® 2.1 high- quality, GPU-accelerated rendering software, which now includes support for Joe Alter's Shave and a Haircut software for computer-generated hair and fur effects.

Yankee Group rebuts Linux-Watch column

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The Yankee Group send us a rebuttal to a recent column by Steven J. Vaughan Nichols entitled, "Weather alert: new Microsoft FUD storm expected." Research fellow Laura Didio's response appears below, in an effort to allow our readers to hear both sides of the story and form their own judgments.

Hello, Steven:

Texstar on Safari

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Just talk

Here are some snapshots of PCLinuxOS' Texstar on vacation in New York City last weekend. He says he's having fun and is glad we ain't there! Big Grin

Actually, he said,

The Ubuntu Experience, Part 1

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PC World recently did a feature article on Operating Systems, and named Ubuntu as their favorite Linux distribution. I decided to document my experience working with Ubuntu, and this first article, Part 1, will detail my experience installing and updating Ubuntu. I'm using the latest version of Ubuntu, 6.1.

Microsoft FAT patent fails in Germany

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While the U.S. courts recently reaffirmed Microsoft's FAT (File Allocation Table) patents, the German Patent Federal Court has just dismissed the patent for use in Germany.

According to a report in the German news publication Heise Online, the court has denied the protection that the European Patent Office granted to Microsoft under EP 0618540 for a "common namespace for long and short filenames." This was based on Microsoft's US Patent No. 5,758,352. The German Patent Court stated that the patent claims Microsoft made are "not based on inventive activity."

Perens to rain on Novell's parade

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Bruce Perens, director of Action on Technology Policy and initiator of the Open Letter to Novell that has been signed by thousands, will hold a press conference during Novell's Brainshare conference in Salt Lake City, Utah next week. The topics will be:

* The Microsoft-Novell agreement

* GPL version 3 and how it will impede Novell from making use of new innovation by the Free Software community

* Software patents vs. Free Software.

More Here.

Candidates for Debian Project Leader sound off

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Once again, the Debian project is gearing up to elect a new project leader, with voting set to begin late this month. As we did last year, we asked the DPL candidates to sound off on some of the issues that will face the Debian Project in the next year.

Out of nine candidates, six took the time to respond to our questions via email. Steve McIntyre, Sven Luther, and incumbent DPL Anthony Towns failed to respond in time for this article. We received responses from Wouter Verhelst, Aigars Mahinovs, Gustavo Franco, Sam Hocevar, Simon Richter, and Raphaël Hertzog.

Why Linux will not displace Windows

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I firmly believe that, all else being equal, the differences between the Windows desktop, the Macintosh desktop, and the Linux desktop are negligible. With the proper applications, all three platforms will be capable of providing a satisfactory experience for any user. All three platforms have both free and commercial products available for personal productivity, web browsing, and basic multimedia.

HP Touts its Prowess in Linux and Open Source

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While everyone knows that Linux is now pervasive in IT organizations, the slippery nature of open source software makes it difficult to gauge how deeply it has penetrated into the data centers of the world. And it is even harder to reckon how much money those Linux investments represent, since in many cases the costs associated with Linux are soft ones--paying system administrators to patch machines--rather than hard ones--buying a license and support contract from a third-party vendor. And if Linux is hard to quantify, other open source software presents even more of a challenge.

Command line tips - controlling your processes

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When you’re running a command that’s going to take a long time in your bash shell, but then you suddenly decide you don’t want to run it any more, CLI newbies can often be stuck as to how they should terminate a running command (aside from closing the terminal window). There are also other occasions when you want to control the process that’s running inside your terminal.

This post is going to give you a quick run-down of some of the most common key combinations that perform useful actions like terminating processes and setting them to run in the foreground and background.

Mozilla wrestles with Firefox 3.0 security moves

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Mozilla Corp. is still wrestling with adding a security feature to Firefox that its browser rival, Microsoft Corp.'s Internet Explorer 7, uses on Windows Vista to keep malware from hijacking computers.

In Vista, IE7 uses a technique Microsoft calls Protected Mode -- another name for "low rights" -- that blocks disk access to all but a temporary-files folder. The idea is that if an exploit -- a drive-by download, for instance -- attacks IE7 through a browser vulnerability, it can't install code on the PC's drive.

Technical Analysis: Linux VPN & How-To

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In our continuing series of papers describing both the research undertaken by the Open Source Software Lab, and technical tips, here is the latest networking configuration technical analysis.

This document provides the reader with an analysis of VPN functionality within the Linux operating system. Specifically, it provides a breakdown of VPN components and a description of what is available to Linux Administrators, in terms of manageability and functionality. It also provides a set of HOW-TO’s in the area’s of VPN and IPsec.

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Netrunner Core 16.09 "Avalon" Is Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8, KDE Plasma 5.7.5

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today's leftovers

  • Acer updates Chromebook 15 with 12-hour battery life -- $199 exclusively at Walmart
    Chromebooks are not for everyone, but for many home users, it is absolute perfection. If you live in the web browser -- as many people do nowadays -- laptops running Google's Linux-based Chrome OS are a godsend because they are maintenance free. No need for confusing OS upgrades or anti-virus software. It just works, and it works well. Since they can now run Android apps too, they could become a serious threat to Microsoft and Windows 10. One of the most attractive aspects of Chromebooks is price -- they are often quite affordable. Today, Acer refreshes its 15.6 inch Chromebook 15 with a mind-boggling 12 hours of battery life. Best of all? It starts at $199. Yes, this model will get Android app support in a future update too.
  • Of Life, Linux and Karma Angels
    Angel filed appeal after appeal only to be denied on every attempt. Texas is an "at will" employment state so being terminated for cause can mean anything. Over the next few weeks, Angel became more and more fearful of losing her house, as she had just purchased it a year before. On top of that, her HP desktop had taken a nose dive into severe brokeness and that made it extra difficult for her to look for work. I put together a decent desktop for her and installed it that day, and was a Linux computer. Angel didn't have even the slightest problem with the new machine, and she wasn't particularly good at using one. So, let's put another slash in the falsehood that Linux is too hard for the everyday user. Most of them anyway. YMMV. To her glee, the OS picked up and configured her Epson all in one without her lifting a finger to do so. She almost clapped for happiness, stating that in Windows, installing that printer had been a nightmare, even with the included driver CD. And just to pinpoint the time frame for you, it was the summer of 2006.
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided to launch on Linux in November, Mac version delayed
    Feral Entertainment has announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will be launching on Linux in November. Feral Interactive is currently working on the Linux port of the game. In September the game development studio announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided would make its way to two additional platforms: Linux and Mac. The Linux version of the game will most likely make use of OpenGL or Vulkan to power its graphics engine.
  • Mad Max: It Came From The Desert to Linux
    First of all, let me get one thing straight out of the way, so you know where I come from. I did not like the recent Mad Max movie. Like, not at all. Not that I mind the post apocalyptic theme. I used to like the older Mad Max’s just fine (probably the first one the best). The new one…meh. The Max character had virtually no back story (as thin as a sheet of paper) and he was just acting like a crazy person from beginning to end. The story’s premise was boring and just an excuse for endless and not so impressive action scenes. So there was nothing redeeming it. I know this is not the mainstream opinion of the movie (everyone apparently thought it was the best thing ever since sliced bread) so I can only attribute this phenomenon to either mass hysteria or simply a clear decrease in movie expectations. The Force Awakens‘ success, despite being a mediocre movie and certainly underwhelming compared to the original trilogy, certainly echoes the same trend. I guess you cannot beat nostalgia. Just tag a Millennium Falcon on and you get a free ride no matter how incoherent the story or the characters are.
  • Budgie Remix 16.10 Overview
  • I Switched To OpenSuse Tumbleweed :)
  • 50-day Moving Average Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At $76.67
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT) – Is this large market cap stock undervalued?
  • Fedora 25 new features, Perl removed from Build Root
    Fedora is the fast-paced bleeding-edge distribution of Red Hat. Fedora 25 is the second release of 2016 the other being Fedora 24. Let’s discover what lies in the future of this popular Linux distribution especially among developers.
  • "dnf update" considered harmful
    Updating a Linux distribution has historically been done from the command line (using tools like Debian's apt-get, openSUSE's zypper, or Fedora's yum—or its successor dnf). A series of crashes during system updates on Fedora 24 led Adam Williamson to post a note to fedora-devel and other mailing lists warning people away from running "dnf update" within desktop environments. It turns out that doing so has never truly been supported—though it works the vast majority of the time. The discussion around Williamson's note, however, makes it clear that the command is commonly run that way and that at least some users are quite surprised (and unhappy) that it isn't a supported option.
  • Supporting UEFI secure boot in Debian
    The Debian project can be accused of many things, but jumping too quickly on leading-edge technology is not one of them. That can be seen in, among other things, the fact that there is still not a version of the distribution that supports the UEFI secure boot mechanism. But, as Ben Hutchings explained during his 2016 Kernel Recipes talk, such support is in the works, and it will be implemented in a uniquely Debian-like manner.
  • The Lenovo Yoga Book Is the Future of Laptops, But It's Missing an Operating System
    For this review I spent a week with the Android version of Lenovo’s slick new backflipping laptop. Guts-wise it’s identical to the Windows 10 variant. They both feature Intel Atom x5-Z8550 processors, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of on-device storage, and 1920 x 1200 resolution displays. The Android version starts at $500 and the Windows version starts at $550.
  • Another Broken Nexus 5
    In late 2013 I bought a Nexus 5 for my wife [1]. It’s a good phone and I generally have no complaints about the way it works. In the middle of 2016 I had to make a warranty claim when the original Nexus 5 stopped working [2]. Google’s warranty support was ok, the call-back was good but unfortunately there was some confusion which delayed replacement. Once the confusion about the IMEI was resolved the warranty replacement method was to bill my credit card for a replacement phone and reverse the charge if/when they got the original phone back and found it to have a defect covered by warranty. This policy meant that I got a new phone sooner as they didn’t need to get the old phone first. This is a huge benefit for defects that don’t make the phone unusable as you will never be without a phone. Also if the user determines that the breakage was their fault they can just refrain from sending in the old phone.