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Friday, 20 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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X-Wrt extends OpenWrt router firmware

Filed under
Software

linux.com: I've been using OpenWrt on my Linksys router for a year or so. I take it for granted -- I ignore it because it just works. But back at X-Wrt.org, which is a related project, not a competitor to OpenWrt, developers have been busy creating a new user interface that both extends OpenWrt and makes it easier to use.

Google OS Expands: MS, Apple and Linux Need Not Worry

Filed under
Google

OSWeekly: It's wild, but for a company that has continuously pointed out their lack of interest in getting into the desktop market, Google sure has been pushing the application side of things awfully hard lately.

Running 32-bit Applications on 64-bit Debian GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) developed a series of 64-bit extensions to their 32-bit RISC-based Intel IA-32 (i386) compatible processors. AMD sell their AMD64 (x86-64) architecture processors under a range of names: Athlon 64; Turion 64; Phenom; Opteron and Sempron (only the latest generation).

Creating A Local Yum Repository (CentOS)

Filed under
HowTos

Sometimes it can be handy to set up your own repository to prevent from downloading the remote repository over and over again. This tutorial shows how to create a CentOS mirror for your local network.

KDE4: plasma.progress();

Filed under
KDE

Aaron J. Seigo: dannya asked me tonight what had gone on with plasma this last week and when i looked over the commits it sort of surprised me how much had =) ruphy did up a little screen cast showing the new icon hovers, but most of the rest of things happened beneath the covers.

Xubuntu is Genuine Windows after all

Filed under
Ubuntu

the Inquirer: MICROSOFT'S security on its Windows Genuine Advantage has been much mocked on the Linux boards over the weekend after it thought that a copy of Xubuntu was a real copy of Windows.

The Peer to Patent Project Has Begun - 5 patents listed

Filed under
Misc

Groklaw: The first patent applications we are invited to try to disqualify by looking for prior art have been posted on the Peer to Patent Project website. This is the project working to provide the USPTO with information about prior art during the application process.

Skype staff play good cop bad cop with Linux users

Filed under
Software

Daniweb: A member of Skype staff posting in the Linux support forum there seems to have taken a course in customer relations from if his responses to criticism of the lack of real world development of the Linux version of Skype, compared to Windows development, are anything to go by.

Mark Shuttleworth: A rags to space tale

Filed under
Interviews

ComputerWorld: Mark Shuttleworth made news in 2002 when he fulfilled a lifelong ambition and became the first South African into space, paying US$20 million to be a civilian cosmonaut on an eight-day flight aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft. In 2004, he founded Ubuntu Linux to bring the operating system to people around the world. He is also the founder of HBD Venture Capital and the non-profit Shuttleworth Foundation.

KDE Commit-Digest for 17th June 2007

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KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Work on engine configurability, data management, a packaging system for Plasmoids and themes, and new refinements in desktop icon interaction in Plasma. The Oxygen window decoration and widget are both moved into kdebase.

Mint Linux 3.0 Light Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Phoronix: The Light edition of the Mint 3.0 Linux distribution is now available. Compared to the regular version of Mint, the Light edition ships without proprietary software, patented technologies, and support for restricted formats. We took a peek this afternoon at this GNOME-based LiveCD distribution.

Mount and Sync Network Shares Using Smb4K

Filed under
Software

Linux App Finder: I often find myself working with data that's stored on multiple computers, and with KDE's network transparency this is an easy thing to do. But of course there are times when network access isn't available, and in this situation being able to easily sync data between two drives is a huge convenience. My solution is Smb4K.

The end of the CK kernel patch set

Filed under
Linux

Frederik's Blog: Today kernel developer Con Kolivas announced that he will stop developing his Linux patch which improves desktop performance. The CK patch set was popular especially amongst desktop users who want to get maximum performance out of their machine.

GPLv2 or GPLv3?: Inside the Debate

Filed under
OSS

datamation: The third version of the GNU General Public License (GPL) won't be released until the end of June. Yet, already, it is proving one of the most controversial developments ever in the free and open source software (FOSS)communities.

Snownews - a command line feed reader

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Feed technology such as RSS and Atom is something that a lot of websites and blogs use to deliver their content directly to users, rather than having the users have to come to the actual site. There are several command line feed reading applications that are available. One of these is called Snownews.

Getting Yesterdays or Tomorrows day with shell date command

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HowTos

nixcraft: When invoked without arguments, the date command displays the current date and time. Depending on the options specified, date will set the date and time or print it in a user defined way.

Ubuntu Feisty on your USB drive - finally!

Filed under
HowTos

xubuntublog: Ubuntu 7.04 “Feisty Fawn” contained some new packages, it also introduced a bug due to which your data would no longer be saved. When it was released, this bug still wasn’t fixed. It is expected to be fixed in the next release, 7.10 “Gutsy Gibbon”, to be released in October of this year. Up until then, we’re out of luck. You’d think.

Also: ‘wget -c’ Bug in Download Script Generated by Synaptic in Ubuntu

Ubuntu says no, but will the Mandriva management follow suit?

Filed under
MDV

opensourcelearning: On the Mandriva Cooker mailinglist there was the following request based on my earlier article that made the case that Mandriva and TurboLinux might be next to partner with Microsoft.

Why Microsoft and Linux companies are tying the knot

Filed under
Linux

linux-watch: OK, so why have Novell, Xandros, and Linspire all gotten into bed with Microsoft? Is it... They were seduced by Steve Ballmer's charming smile? They've gone over to the dark side of the force? Terror of Microsoft's mighty patent portfolio had them groveling at Microsoft's feet?

Open-source desktop quest almost complete

Filed under
OSS

ComputerWorld: Is 2008 the year of the open-source desktop? Red Hat Linux is now widely deployed on the servers in my datacentre. Users have no idea what operating system underlies our web applications and databases, nor do they care, as long as those tools are highly available.

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More in Tux Machines

Docker 1.13, Containers, and DevOps

  • Introducing Docker 1.13
    Today we’re releasing Docker 1.13 with lots of new features, improvements and fixes to help Docker users with New Year’s resolutions to build more and better container apps. Docker 1.13 builds on and improves Docker swarm mode introduced in Docker 1.12 and has lots of other fixes. Read on for Docker 1.13 highlights.
  • Docker 1.13 Officially Released, Docker for AWS and Azure Ready for Production
    Docker announced today the general availability of Docker 1.13, the third major update of the open-source application container engine for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems. Docker 1.13 has been in development for the past couple of months, during which it received no less than seven RC (Release Candidate) versions that implemented numerous improvements for the new Swarm Mode introduced in Docker 1.12, a few security features, as well as a new Remote API (version 1.25) and Client.
  • Distributed Fabric: A New Architecture for Container-Based Applications
    There’s a palpable sense of excitement in the application development world around container technology. Containers bring a new level of agility and speed to app development, giving developers the ability to break large monolithic apps into small, manageable microservices that can talk to one another, be more easily tested and deployed, and operate more efficiently as a full application. However, containers also demand a new architecture for the application services managing these microservices and apps, particularly in regards to service discovery — locating and consuming the services of those microservices.
  • DevOps trends emerging for 2017 and beyond
    Finally, one of the biggest trends for 2017 will not be just a focus on engaging and implementing some of these DevOps best practices into your enterprise, but a sweeping adoption of the DevOps/agile culture. This is because one of the most important – if not the absolute most key –tenets to a successful DevOps organization is culture. The enterprises that most espouse the shared responsibility, the empowered autonomous teams, the can-do attitudes, and the continuous learning environment in which DevOps thrives will see the biggest benefits.

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Optimizing Linux for Slow Computers
    It’s interesting, to consider what constitutes a power user of an operating system. For most people in the wider world a power user is someone who knows their way around Windows and Microsoft Office a lot, and can help them get their print jobs to come out right. For those of us in our community, and in particular Linux users though it’s a more difficult thing to nail down. If you’re a LibreOffice power user like your Windows counterpart, you’ve only really scratched the surface. Even if you’ve made your Raspberry Pi do all sorts of tricks in Python from the command line, or spent a career shepherding websites onto virtual Linux machines loaded with Apache and MySQL, are you then a power user compared to the person who knows their way around the system at the lower level and has an understanding of the kernel? Probably not. It’s like climbing a mountain with false summits, there are so many layers to power usership. So while some of you readers will be au fait with your OS at its very lowest level, most of us will be somewhere intermediate. We’ll know our way around our OS in terms of the things we do with it, and while those things might be quite advanced we’ll rely on our distribution packager to take care of the vast majority of the hard work.
  • Long-Term Maintenance, or How to (Mis-)Manage Embedded Systems for 10+ Years
    In this presentation, kernel hacker Jan Lübbe will explain why apparently reasonable approaches to long-term maintenance fail and how to establish a sustainable workflow instead.
  • Linux 4.9 Is the Next Long-Term Supported Kernel Branch, Says Greg Kroah-Hartman
    Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman confirmed today, January 19, 2017, in a short message, on his Google+ page, that the Linux 4.9 branch is now marked as "longterm," or as some of you know as LTS (Long-Term Support). The story behind Linux kernel 4.9 becoming the next long-term supported series dates from way before it's launch last month, on December 11, when Linus Torvalds officially announced the new branch. It all started back on August 12, 2016, when Greg Kroah-Hartman dropped a quick Google+ post to say "4.9 == next LTS kernel."
  • Maintainers Don't Scale
    First let’s look at how the kernel community works, and how a change gets merged into Linus Torvalds’ repository. Changes are submitted as patches to mailing list, then get some review and eventually get applied by a maintainer to that maintainer’s git tree. Each maintainer then sends pull request, often directly to Linus. With a few big subsystems (networking, graphics and ARM-SoC are the major ones) there’s a second or third level of sub-maintainers in. 80% of the patches get merged this way, only 20% are committed by a maintainer directly. Most maintainers are just that, a single person, and often responsible for a bunch of different areas in the kernel with corresponding different git branches and repositories. To my knowledge there are only three subsystems that have embraced group maintainership models of different kinds: TIP (x86 and core kernel), ARM-SoC and the graphics subsystem (DRM).

Graphics in Linux

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Has Geometry Shader Support For Testing
    David Airlie has published a set of 31 patches for testing that provide initial support for geometry shaders within the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver. While RadeonSI has long supported geometry shaders, it's been a bigger work item bringing it to this open-source Radeon Vulkan driver within Mesa. The patches are enough for Vulkan geometry shaders to get working on RADV, but Airlie explains that the support isn't gold: "This is a first pass at geometry shader support on radv, all the code should be here in reviewable pieces, it seems to mostly pass CTS tests but triggers some llvm 3.9 bugs around kill, and there might still be a GPU hang in here, but this should still be a good place to start reviewing."
  • libinput 1.6.0
    This release fixes the slow touchpad acceleration on touchpads with less than 1000dpi, a missing call to normalized the deltas was the source of the issue.
  • Libinput 1.6 Released With New Touchpad Acceleration
    Libinput 1.6.0 was announced a short time ago on wayland-devel.
  • Mesa 17 Gets a First Release Candidate, Final Planned for Early February 2017
    Collabora's Emil Velikov announced today, January 19, 2017, the availability of the first of many Release Candidate (RC) development versions of the upcoming and highly anticipated Mesa 17.0.0 3D Graphics Library. Mesa 17 is shaping up to be a huge milestone that should dramatically improve the performance of the bundled open-source graphics drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, Nvidia graphics cards on a Linux-based operating system. Just the other day it enabled OpenGL 4.5 support for Intel Haswell GPUs, which is already a big achievement.

Android Leftovers

  • Donald Trump has surrendered his Android phone
    Donald Trump has given up his beloved Android phone ahead of today’s inauguration, the Associated Press reports, though it is unclear what type of device he will use in the White House. According to The New York Times, Trump is now using a more secure, encrypted handset that was approved by the Secret Service. He also has a different phone number, the Times reports, citing people close to the president-elect. Trump doesn’t use email, but he does use his Android phone to tweet. He’s also been very accessible throughout the presidential campaign and transition, taking calls from reporters, politicians, and world leaders. Malcolm Turnbull, the prime minister of Australia, called Trump to congratulate him on his electoral victory after getting his cellphone number from professional golfer Greg Norman.
  • Best affordable Android smartphones you can buy [January 2017]
    There are new smartphones hitting the market constantly, but which is the best to pick up when you’re trying to save a buck or two? We’ve seen some great launches this summer and we’re only expecting more over the coming months, but for now, let’s go over the best affordable Android smartphones you can go pick up today…
  • A list of every Samsung phone getting Android 7.0 Nougat this year
  • WatchMaker to support Gear S2 & Gear S3, 1000s of watchfaces incoming
    WatchMaker, a popular Android and Android Wear watchface platform, has some good news for our readers. They are currently in the process of expanding their supported platforms and will be targeting Tizen and its latest wearable smartwatches, the Samsung Gear S2 and Gear S3.