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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Three little zillas from Taiwan srlinuxx 13/02/2011 - 12:39am
Story Samsung is backing Linux (SLP) srlinuxx 13/02/2011 - 12:38am
Story The Latest Details On The State Of Qt & MeeGo srlinuxx 13/02/2011 - 12:36am
Story Cuba Announces Migration to Open-Source Software srlinuxx 13/02/2011 - 12:34am
Story First Stable Release Of Mageia In June: Exclusive Interview srlinuxx 13/02/2011 - 12:33am
Story Free and completely Ubuntu srlinuxx 12/02/2011 - 9:32pm
Story A few useful Ubuntu utilities srlinuxx 12/02/2011 - 9:29pm
Story Revisited: KDE 4.6 srlinuxx 12/02/2011 - 9:24pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News 162 is out srlinuxx 12/02/2011 - 9:22pm
Story Can Free, "Open-Source" Software Bridge the Gender Gap in Technology? srlinuxx 12/02/2011 - 9:21pm

aKademy 2006 Kicked Off

Filed under
KDE

aKademy 2006 has been kicked off at the Trinity College in Dublin. The first two days consist of the contributors conference with a fully packed programme of presentations on aspects such as the community, KDE 4, cross-desktop collaboration and KDE & the Free Desktop in Asian countries.

Myah OS v2.2 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Myah OS: ever hear of it? Neither did we till we decided to give it a shot with its recent 2.2 release. Myah OS is built on GNU/Linux with the KDE desktop environment but they have extensively tweaked the user interface and have made it a relatively visually pleasing desktop -- except for the fact that it looks very similar to Windows XP in many respects. Myah OS 2.2 is based upon Slackware 11, Linux 2.6.17.8 kernel, and includes many proprietary packages such as ATI/NVIDIA and Sun's Java.

Those Screenshots.

Linux for mere mortals

Filed under
Linux

You don't have to be a technician to intsall the latest version of the alternative operating system, writes Rob Pegoraro. The Linux operating system - a free, open-source alternative to Windows and Mac OS X - has long served to define the gap between people who merely use computers and those who tinker with them.

The Lniux Boot Process Explained

Filed under
HowTos

The beginning of the boot process varies depending on the hardware platform being used. However, once the kernel is found and loaded by the boot loader, the default boot process is identical across all architectures.

Stallman gets it right on patents

Filed under
OSS

The way of the Free Software Foundation is to insist on purity. The way of open source is to seek compromises. Once again these two camps have come up against each other - and the issue this time is patents. Last year, the Open Source Development Lab, which refers to itself grandiosely as the "centre of gravity of Linux", set in motion a project called Open Source as Prior Art; the project's aim is to "see fewer poor quality patents."

Is Debian dying?

Filed under
Linux

For a while, Debian was the community Linux darling. In its heyday, Debian was known for its strong moral point of view and its outstanding code. Numerous important distributions, such as Linspire, Knoppix, and today's most popular distribution, Ubuntu, have sprung from it. Things have changed.

Rediscovering Bluetooth

Filed under
Software

Presenting Bluetooth in 2006 is hard. By all accounts, it should have emerged much sooner to be omnipresent by now. Yet it did not succeed as planned and therefore carries a bad reputation. Bluetooth is popular, but not as popular as WiFi. However, you can do a lot more with Bluetooth, especially with casual hacking.

A Matter of Trust

Filed under
Misc

If someone betrays your trust, it can be a very hard road to travel to earn that trust back. The most recent example of a loss of trust in the IT industry has been the recent alleged actions conducted by members of the HP board of directors. When I read this September 18 vnunet.com headline: "Open Source Community Welcomes Microsoft Patent Pledge." Here was, in complete form, my initial thought: We do?

OpenOffice plug-in plan set for debut

Filed under
OOo

Following in Firefox's footsteps, the next version of OpenOffice.org will support plug-in extensions to attract developers to the open-source productivity suite.

Linux developers sign a petition rejecting the current draft of GPLv3

Filed under
OSS

Nothing has created furore more than the GPL version 3 which is still in the draft stage. The Free Software Foundation's move to create a separate version of GPL taking corrective measures to guard against DRM has not been well received by the core group of Linux developers which includes Linus Torvalds.

NVIDIA 1.0-9625 Display Drivers

Filed under
Software

Two days after delivering our NVIDIA 1.0-9XXX Series Preview, NVIDIA has shocked the alternative OS community by not only delivering a Beta candidate for the Linux display drivers but also for Solaris and FreeBSD! While our preview featured many of the same changes found in this release, today at Phoronix we have all of the details on this 1.0-9625 Beta.

Alan Cox's ThinkPad battery explodes

Filed under
Misc

It appears that the exploding IBM ThinkPad that we spotted last week at LAX may not have been a fluke after all. Telsa Gwynne, wife of famed Linux kernel programmer Alan Cox, describes on her website how her husband's ThinkPad battery suddenly exploded last night.

Linux: Looking At 2.6.19, No Reiser4 yet

Filed under
Linux

Andrew Morton posted his patch queue with numerous comments about merge plans into the mainline kernel. Among his comments he noted that he would not yet be merging the Reiser4 filesystem, "reiser4. I was planning on merging this, but the batch_write/writev problemight wreck things, and I don't think the patches arising from my recent partial review have come through yet. So it's looking more like 2.6.20."

Red Flag Linux may be next on IBM's agenda

Filed under
Linux

The next Linux distribution that IBM throws its weight behind is likely to be China's Red Flag Linux, suggesting that for businesses elsewhere in the world the Linux market will remain a two-horse race for the time being.

32 bits are better than 64

Filed under
SUSE

RECENT TESTS conducted using a Small Business Transaction Benchmark from Neal Nelson showed that a 32-bit version of Suse Linux Enterprise Server 10 provided up to 37 percent more throughput than a 64-bit version.

Should Shuttleworth Address United Nations?

Filed under
Misc

Mark Shuttleworth should sell the idea of non-patentable shared "open energy technology" to world leaders as its potential to have a profound impact on the reduction of the greenhouse gases is enormous.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Beta 1: Look but Don't Touch

Filed under
Reviews

The features Red Hat says will be in RHEL 5 sound great, but the promise was hard to prove in tests because of some system flakiness and omissions.

Quick guide to get a girlfriend using Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos
Humor

This guide is pretty straightforward. No introductions, lectures or philosophing about love. Follow it from beginning to end, and you might get a woman today!

Create training videos with pyvnc2swf

Filed under
HowTos

How many times has someone verbally explained how to do something on a computer to you? How many times do you end up asking them to just show you? For these situations there is pyvnc2swf, a program that turns screen input into video files. Let's see just how easy it is to use it to producing training videos.

OpenOffice bundles Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

Future versions of OpenOffice.org will come bundled with Mozilla's Thunderbird email client and Lightning calendar application.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more