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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 20 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2014 - 2:51am
Story Make Your Mark on the World With Linux Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2014 - 2:31am
Story XnConvert Review – An Image Batch Processor like No Other Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:43pm
Story Season of KDE Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:38pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" MATE Stable Is Ready for Download – Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:32pm
Story KWayland Server Component Coming For KDE Plasma 5.2 Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:27pm
Story Where is M13? Review – A Simple and Powerful Galactic Atlas Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:16pm
Story Raspberry Pi and Coder by Google for beginners and kids Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:13pm
Story ‘Where is the nearest?’: Spain shares code for web map-tool Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:07pm
Story Top 4 Linux screenwriting software Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:03pm

Why I love Debian

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euneeblic.livejournal: Ubuntu and Linux Mint are great for new users, but I'm not a new user. I'm not trying to be snobby, and I don't think I'm better than anyone else; I just have different needs than most people. I don't want polish. I want to see and work with the guts of my operating system.

The sweet features of Fedora - Smolt

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Software It would be very beautiful and comfortable if there were some GNU/Linux distribution that keep track of used hardware of the users or just could provide information how the particular hardware would perform. I know such a distribution - Fedora.

Arch Of The Penguins

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reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: THERE are those Linux distributions which will install in a coffee break, with little intervention required from the user. And there are those which demand plentiful reading beforehand, a thorough knowledge of one's hardware and a calm, clear mind.

X3 Reunion Still Actively In Development

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Gaming Back in July we shared that X3: Reunion, one of the latest PC game titles being ported to Linux by Linux Game Publishing, was still in development. This game continues on where X2: The Threat had left off.

PCBSD 7.0 Review

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BSD PCBSD is one of the first distributions that has taken a different path when it released its user friendly distribution by choosing to base itself on FreeBSD instead of Linux.

Top 10 reasons why Steve Ballmer should be certified insane

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Humor Steve Ballmer is many things: Microsoft CEO, 43rd richest person on the planet, monkey dancing video star. Wikipedia says that he has "been known to be very passionate in expressing his enthusiasm." We have 10 reasons to suggest (tongue in cheek) he should be in a rubber room eating soft fruit...

Review: Xubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 6

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Ubuntu Xubuntu is an official Ubuntu project and is released along side Ubuntu and Kubuntu. It first appeared as part of the 6.06 release fest which happened mid 2006 and has given older PC's a new lease on life by providing a leaner window manager.

Interview with Walter Bender of Sugar Labs

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Interviews Sean Daly and I had the opportunity to interview by email Walter Bender, formerly president of software and content with OLPC and now the founder of Sugar Labs. Sugar Labs is the name of the nonprofit organization being established to support the development of the educational Sugar software, which was originally created for the One Laptop Per Child project.

Benchmark: Apache2 vs. Lighttpd (Static HTML Files)

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This benchmark shows how Apache2 (version 2.2.3) and lighttpd (version 1.4.13) perform compared to each other when delivering a static HTML file (about 50KB in size).

Prominent public figures in Open Source world

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OSS Open source has taken the world by storm. Numerous open source applications are being used by satisfied users. The most prominent and widely used open source products are Firefox, Linux Distributions,Sugar CRM, GIMP, Wordpress, emacs etc. As OS software is influencing the lives of so many people, lets take a look at the commonly known people of OS.

Linux: the girlfriend test

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Linux The world has changed in the last 10 years. Humans finally have hover cars, unlimited energy and a cure for cancer. Well, not exactly, but Linux is almost ready for the mainstream desktop. Which is just as exciting. Sort of.

The Decline Of Gentoo Linux

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Gentoo I recently began charting the freefall of the Gentoo Linux distribution. The project peaked in 2003 but has been in steady decline since Daniel Robbins got up from the captains chair. The release history on distrowatch gives a good 30-thousand foot view.

few odds & ends

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  • Linux Void: Episode 7 - Open Source Robot Army

  • The "Baby" Man Page - Humor
  • OSI Open Source Definition
  • Wine 1.1.5 Released
  • Vimperator
  • More Gutbusting RFC's - Humor

some howtos:

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  • Throw Your Cube into an Aquarium

  • Ubuntu’s Uncomplicated Firewall (UFW)
  • Synaptics Touchpad and X configuration on Gentoo
  • Recovering Ubuntu or Fedora Linux after installing windows
  • Pimp your Blackberry with the Ubuntu Theme!
  • Workbench on Linux
  • Enabling NFS in Ubuntu

Gentoo 2008.0 Desktop - Stable now

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Gentoo Due to my busy schedule of the previous week, it actually took me roughly a week to finally get my Gentoo 2008.0 Desktop and configured. This is the first time in over two years that I actually got a fully functional Gentoo system. I even got 3D direct rendering working with nvidia and xorg.

FlameRobin: A GUI to Administer Firebird/Interbase SQL servers

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Software FlameRobin is a X-platform GUI application that makes the life of Firebird/Interbase admins easier. It’s a very light-weight solution, but being lightweight doesn’t mean to be poor in features.

Interesting new developments in Ubuntu Intrepid Alpha 6

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Ubuntu Although I don't use Ubuntu anymore, I still try to keep up with the news on it, and I'v tested the upcoming Intrepid a couple of times recently. There have been some interesting developmetns which I'd like to let you know about.

Also: Test driving the new Ubuntu 8.10

Distributions I’m looking forward to

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celettu.wordpress: I am looking forward to the upcoming releases of some distributions, some of them old favourites, some of them I’ve never installed before.

Muppy Interview

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Interviews Mini-sys is a Puppy Linux fork, designed for stable, commercial use. It includes many enhancements for the home and professional user. 'Muppy' is the code name for Minisys-Linux.∞

Mesa 7.2 Has Been Released

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Software Mesa 7.2 has just under a dozen official fixes and it also adds 3D acceleration support for the new lower-end Intel G41 Chipset. The Mesa 7.1 release had support for the original DRI2.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE: KDE Applications 18.04, KDE Connect, KMyMoney 5.0.1 and Qt Quick

  • KDE Applications 18.04 branches created
    Make sure you commit anything you want to end up in the KDE Applications 18.04 release to them :)
  • KDE Connect – State of the union
    We haven’t blogged about KDE Connect in a long time, but that doesn’t mean that we’ve been lazy. Some new people have joined the project and together we have implemented some exciting features. Our last post was about version 1.0, but recently we released version 1.8 of the Android app and 1.2.1 of the desktop component some time ago, which we did not blog about yet. Until now!
  • KMyMoney 5.0.1 released
    The KMyMoney development team is proud to present the first maintenance version 5.0.1 of its open source Personal Finance Manager. Although several members of the development team had been using the new version 5.0.0 in production for some time, a number of bugs and regressions slipped through testing, mainly in areas and features not used by them.
  • Qt Quick without a GPU: i.MX6 ULL
    With the introduction of the Qt Quick software renderer it became possible to use Qt Quick on devices without a GPU. We investigated how viable this option is on a lower end device, particularly the NXP i.MX6 ULL. It turns out that with some (partially not yet integrated) patches developed by KDAB and The Qt Company, the performance is very competitive. Even smooth video playback (with at least half-size VGA resolution) can be done by using the PXP engine on the i.MX6 ULL.

Red Hat Leftovers

Debian Leftovers

  • RcppSMC 0.2.1: A few new tricks
    A new release, now at 0.2.1, of the RcppSMC package arrived on CRAN earlier this afternoon (and once again as a very quick pretest-publish within minutes of submission).
  • sbuild-debian-developer-setup(1) (2018-03-19)
    I have heard a number of times that sbuild is too hard to get started with, and hence people don’t use it. To reduce hurdles from using/contributing to Debian, I wanted to make sbuild easier to set up. sbuild ≥ 0.74.0 provides a Debian package called sbuild-debian-developer-setup. Once installed, run the sbuild-debian-developer-setup(1) command to create a chroot suitable for building packages for Debian unstable.
  • control-archive 1.8.0
    This is the software that maintains the archive of control messages and the newsgroups and active files on I update things in place, but it's been a while since I made a formal release, and one seemed overdue (particularly since it needed some compatibility tweaks for GnuPG v1).
  • The problem with the Code of Conduct
  • Some problems with Code of Conducts

OSS Leftovers

  • Can we build a social network that serves users rather than advertisers?
    Today, open source software is far-reaching and has played a key role driving innovation in our digital economy. The world is undergoing radical change at a rapid pace. People in all parts of the world need a purpose-built, neutral, and transparent online platform to meet the challenges of our time. And open principles might just be the way to get us there. What would happen if we married digital innovation with social innovation using open-focused thinking?
  • Digital asset management for an open movie project
    A DAMS will typically provide something like a search interface combined with automatically collected metadata and user-assisted tagging. So, instead of having to remember where you put the file you need, you can find it by remembering things about it, such as when you created it, what part of the project it connects to, what's included in it, and so forth. A good DAMS for 3D assets generally will also support associations between assets, including dependencies. For example, a 3D model asset may incorporate linked 3D models, textures, or other components. A really good system can discover these automatically by examining the links inside the asset file.
  • LG Releases ‘Open Source Edition’ Of webOS Operating System
  • Private Internet Access VPN opens code-y kimono, starting with Chrome extension
    VPN tunneller Private Internet Access (PIA) has begun open sourcing its software. Over the next six months, the service promises that all its client-side software will make its way into the hands of the Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) community, starting with PIA's Chrome extension. The extension turns off mics, cameras, Adobe's delightful Flash plug-in, and prevents IP discovery. It also blocks ads and tracking. Christel Dahlskjaer, director of outreach at PIA, warned that "our code may not be perfect, and we hope that the wider FOSS community will get involved."
  • Open sourcing FOSSA’s build analysis in fossa-cli
    Today, FOSSA is open sourcing our dependency analysis infrastructure on GitHub. Now, everyone can participate and have access to the best tools to get dependency data out of any codebase, no matter how complex it is.
  • syslog-ng at SCALE 2018
    It is the fourth year that syslog-ng has participated at Southern California Linux Expo or, as better known to many, SCALE ‒ the largest Linux event in the USA. In many ways, it is similar to FOSDEM in Europe, however, SCALE also focuses on users and administrators, not just developers. It was a pretty busy four days for me.
  • Cisco's 'Hybrid Information-Centric Networking' gets a workout at Verizon
  • Verizon and Cisco ICN Trial Finds Names More Efficient Than Numbers
  • LLVM-MCA Will Analyze Your Machine Code, Help Analyze Potential Performance Issues
    One of the tools merged to LLVM SVN/Git earlier this month for the LLVM 7.0 cycle is LLVM-MCA. The LLVM-MCA tool is a machine code analyzer that estimates how the given machine code would perform on a specific CPU and attempt to report possible bottlenecks. The LLVM-MCA analysis tool uses information already used within LLVM about a given CPU family's scheduler model and other information to try to statically measure how the machine code would carry out on a particular CPU, even going as far as estimating the instructions per cycle and possible resource pressure.
  • Taking Data Further with Standards
    Imagine reading a book, written by many different authors, each working apart from the others, without guidelines, and published without edits. That book is a difficult read — it's in 23 different languages, there's no consistency in character names, and the story gets lost. As a reader, you have an uphill battle to get the information to tell you one cohesive story. Data is a lot like that, and that's why data standards matter. By establishing common standards for the collection, storage, and control of data and information, data can go farther, be integrated with other data, and make "big data" research and development possible. For example, NOAA collects around 20 terabytes of data every day.Through the National Ocean Service, instruments are at work daily gathering physical data in the ocean, from current speed to the movement of schools of fish and much more. Hundreds of government agencies and programs generate this information to fulfill their missions and mandates, but without consistency from agency to agency, the benefits of that data are limited. In addition to federal agencies, there are hundreds more non-federal and academic researchers gathering data every day. Having open, available, comprehensive data standards that are widely implemented facilitates data sharing, and when data is shared, it maximizes the benefits of "big data"— integrated, multi-source data that yields a whole greater than its parts.