Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 04 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu’s HUD srlinuxx 25/01/2012 - 5:42am
Story On the Topics of Software, Average Users and User Friendliness srlinuxx 25/01/2012 - 5:36am
Story Linux Vendors Rush to Patch Privilege Escalation Flaw After Root Exploits Emerge srlinuxx 25/01/2012 - 4:43am
Story Firefox in 2012 srlinuxx 24/01/2012 - 11:31pm
Story REMnux 3 review – a treasure chest for the malware-curious srlinuxx 24/01/2012 - 11:15pm
Story IceWM on openSUSE 12.1 srlinuxx 24/01/2012 - 10:49pm
Story OilRush Gold! srlinuxx 24/01/2012 - 10:47pm
Story Beyond the desktop: Ubuntu Linux's new Head-Up Display srlinuxx 2 24/01/2012 - 8:24pm
Story Opera 11.61 released srlinuxx 24/01/2012 - 8:16pm
Story XFS Developer Takes Shots At Btrfs, EXT4 srlinuxx 24/01/2012 - 8:13pm

Oracle's Unbreakable Linux...All about Microsoft?

Filed under
Microsoft

I had lunch with a friend today that is making me reconsider some of my previous comments on Oracle's Unbreakable Linux moves. I still think the company went about it in the wrong way, but it makes more sense to me now.

What If Oracle's move against Red Hat was not about Red Hat at all? What if it was in response to the Microsoft threat?

Interview with srlinuxx - owner and operator of Tuxmachines.org

Filed under
Interviews

Tuxmachines.org has been a popular haunt of mine for some time and it's been one of the key catalysts in propelling Seopher.com into view. So it only seemed right to thank srlinuxx personally and find out a little bit more about the leader of this popular site...

About Tuxmachines.org

When and why did you decide to start Tuxmachines.org?

Open-Source Graphics: Will You Bet On This Dark Horse?

Filed under
OSS

The open source movement, whose efforts I regularly monitor, is a sometimes bemusing, sometimes bewildering, but almost always estimable mix of pragmatism and "pipe dreaming". Graphics is, along with Wi-Fi, a common sticking point for folks interested in garnering robust hardware support within their chosen operating system and applications.

A Beautiful Dock For Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

Finally, the time has come. I’ve been looking high and low for a stable, easy to install, usable and good looking dock for ubuntu. My search has ended (for the time being) with AWN.

Reverend Ted Leaves Novell

Filed under
SUSE

A Brief Retrospective

Quinn Storm personally discusses Beryl

Filed under
Interviews

Today, we interviewed Quinn Storm, the initiator of the Beryl project.

Ubuntu 7 - A Viable Windows Desktop Replacement?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Many are resisting upgrading to Windows Vista. Reasons range from performance issues to the general perception of few, if any, value added features. Unfortunately, many Windows users are being forced into Vista by large OEMs such as Dell. By the end of December, XP will no longer be an option when purchasing a new PC.

E-mail Architecture I

Filed under
HowTos

E-mail is the most popular application on the Internet today. Closelyfollowed by search. This article aims to take a high level view of thevarious components that go into making e-mail work for you.

Freespire 2.0, Linspire 6.0, CNR v2 rollout plans published

Filed under
Linux

Linspire has published the release schedules for its two Linux distributions -- Linspire and Freespire -- and the overhaul of its CNR (click-and-run) software update system to support multiple Linux distributions, including Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Ubuntu.

The Truth About Open Source Security

Filed under
OSS

Open source software -- it's fast, it's popular, it's practical, and, best of all, it's free.

GNOME 2.19.1 released

Filed under
Software

Version 2.19.1 of the GNOME desktop environment has been released with much exclamation. "Welcome to the new GNOME development cycle! Please fasten your seat belt: you're going to see a lot of exciting new changes!, new features!, new bugfixes!, new translations!, new documentation!.

Open Source Needs Better Public Relations

Filed under
OSS

Webopedia.com defines open source as “… a program in which source code is available to the general public for use and/or modification from its original design free of charge, i.e. open.” It is a simple definition. To me, it means that there is software out there on the net that has been put together by a community of people.

Building the XO: Porting a PyGTK game to Sugar, part two

Filed under
HowTos

In the last lesson we learned about what made Block Party tick. In this lesson, we will turn the same PyGtk codebase into a Sugar activity with only minimal modification of the core code.

Operating System Showdown: Ubuntu Vs. Vista

Filed under
Humor

Other tech sites will bore you with in-depth "technical details" and performance specs in their product analysis. At BBspot we pull back from the boring benchmarks to compare the superficialities, and we do it all on a single page.

blender

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Using the policy of bad-news-first: Blender’s interface is just flat-out confusing. I’ve been double-teaming my learning with a copy of the No Starch Press’s Blender Book and some of the free video tutorials from the Blender site.

Review: SimplyMEPIS Linux 6.5

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

A few weeks ago, MEPIS released SimplyMEPIS 6.5. The latest version of the Ubuntu-based desktop distribution offers a number of interesting new features, including a 64-bit release and Beryl for 3-D desktop effects. After spending a fair amount of time with the release, I found it to be a worthy update to earlier versions of MEPIS.

Ubuntu: making things easier

Filed under
Ubuntu

I’ve had my eye on the Beryl project for some time now. Problem is, I’m a loyal Slackware user, and it’s a royal pain in the rear getting it to work on the platform. Beryl isn’t the only problem child, either. I’ve never been able to get Gcdmaster working, and the less said about DVD authoring, the better.

Linux: 2.6.21 Kernel Released

Filed under
Linux

Linux creator Linus Torvalds announced the release of the 2.6.21 kernel, "if the goal for 2.6.20 was to be a stable release (and it was), the goal for 2.6.21 is to have just survived the big timer-related changes and some of the other surprises (just as an example: we were apparently unlucky enough to hit what looks like a previously unknown hardware errata in one of the ethernet drivers that got

That Linux thing - where’s the vision?

Filed under
Linux

I get asked, fairly often, why I'm down on Linux. I'm not - I'm like a guy with three kids: love all of them, but find myself spending more time with one than the other two - hey, I even have the guilt that goes with the analogy!

How did we all end up with Windows?

Filed under
Microsoft

It's amazing how many people who have Microsoft Windows everywhere look flummoxed when asked whether Windows is their "standard" for desktop computing.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

today's howtos