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Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Filed under
News
  • Apache Guru Greg Stein Mugged

  • Awesome timeline of Unix, Linux and Mac OSX
  • Linux: The Really Fair Scheduler
  • More clues point to Google phone
  • Linux is so cool because....

Today's Leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Animal Logic keeps Linux on edge

  • using wget for data and file transfers
  • More Microsoft Malfeasance
  • Hackers adopt Linux-based IAD
  • Java administration tips for Ubuntu
  • next desktop jump
  • Unix is not just Unix
  • Defining OSS Community Roles - Why the Fuss?
  • fix Debian Etch font problem
  • Traffic Monitoring with vnStat

GNOME: 10 years old but did we need it?

Filed under
Software

iTWire: This month, the GNOME project - one of two main choices when it comes to desktop environments for Linux - celebrates 10 years of existence. Is this just one more case of duplication in the FOSS arena? Did we need GNOME at all?

Creating a Dropdown List in Calc

Filed under
HowTos

openoffice.org tips: I just started using feature this recently, for my LinuxWorld presentation. It's very nice. Anytime you can reference some text, rather than embedding it in the formatting, it's good.

Also: Adding contents automatically in Calc

Can Microsoft’s open source problem be solved?

Filed under
Microsoft

Dana Blankenhorn: Instead of selling Windows for, say, $150, through an OEM, sell one year of it for $99. Require registration for updates, and then charge $75/year for maintenance, just like the anti-virals do.

zfs vs xfs vs ext4

Filed under
OS

tastic.brillig.org: This is my attempt to cut through the hype and uncertainty to find a storage subsystem that works. I compared XFS and EXT4 under Linux with ZFS under OpenSolaris.

Xubuntu Gutsy Herd 5 -- first impressions

Filed under
Ubuntu

CLICK: I downloaded and burned the Xubuntu Gutsy Herd 5 live CD and loaded it up. I realize that this is beta and not all the bugs are worked out, and with that criterion, things are working very well. But I'm left wondering "Why?"

Alpha road test - Gnash 0.8.1

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Flash is everywhere on the web nowadays. From YouTube (and the myriad of other video sites), to corporate websites, to online portfolios, a web experience without Flash Player installed isn’t really a complete web experience. For some time, the GNU Project has been working to build a free replacement for Flash Player.

Vista SP1's delay is Desktop Linux's good news

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

DesktopLinux: Vista's been something of a flop. I know it. You know it. Even in Bill Gates' secret sanctum hidden underneath his mansion they know it. Businesses, in particular, aren't about to touch Vista for corporate desktops until they get SP1. Guess what? They're not going to be getting it anytime soon.

midday link dump

Filed under
News
  • Tabbed File Browsing

  • Linux (Simply Mepis vs pclinuxos 2007) installation on a PC
  • Multiboot - Solaris and Ubuntu
  • "The Linux Experience" at Dell, a tale of woe and wow.
  • Utah Open Source Conference
  • klik2 Development: A First Screencast with First Results
  • Ubuntu Founder Mark Shuttleworth on Productivity and Linux
  • Becoming a part of the Firefox quality assurance process
  • Installing Valve’s STEAM and Counterstrike on Ubuntu
  • BibleTime - Bible study from Linux howto

Can Novell’s Linux business stand on its own?

Filed under
SUSE

zdnet blogs: Novell’s partnership with Microsoft to resell SUSE has drawn fire from many quarters, but in the end the deal appears to have delivered the desired effect: Jump start Novell as a Linux player.

Linux: Kexec Hibernation Performance

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Ying Huang continues to work on his kexec-based hibernation patches. Currently only supporting the i386 architecture, Ying notes, "the setup of hibernation/restore is fairly complex. I will continue working on simplifying."

LinuxWorld Conference & Expo 2007 is Postponed

Filed under
Linux

linuxworldexpo: It is with regret that we must announce that LinuxWorld Conference & Expo 2007 has been postponed until spring 2008. We hope to be in touch shortly with new dates.

OLPC battery life--an update

Filed under
OLPC

c|net blogs: After my Monday-morning blog post reporting on some preliminary battery-life testing for the XO laptop from the One Laptop Per Child project, I was contacted by Jim Gettys, vice president software for OLPC.

Also: Quanta to hit North American market with low-priced laptops

How-To: PCLinuxOS 2007 and MythTV

Filed under
HowTos

linux-blog.org: For those of you who always thought PCLinuxOS and MythTV would go together...you’re quite right, they do fit well together...though there are a few bumps on the road. Hopefully, this how-to will help you along the way.

Custom NimbleX lives up to its name with do-it-yourself install image

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Do-it-yourself distributions have made great strides since Linux from Scratch, or even rPath's rBuilder Online. One of the most elegant tools to emerge recently is Custom NimbleX, a PHP program that allows you to construct an ISO image in your browser and then download it.

The applications I can’t live without

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: My sudden defection from the dwindling Graveman fan club (is there anyone left there now?) set me to wondering what other applications I’m clinging to, that might not have any real merit to them. As best I can tell, all these are available in both Arch and Ubuntu.

The ATI R500 On Linux: Then & Now

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: Back in 2006 there was no open-source R500 driver either. Over the past 16 months with R500 support in the fglrx driver, the features have continually improved with an AMD Catalyst Control Center for Linux and support for the newer R500 graphics cards.

No KDE 4 for Fedora 8

Filed under
KDE

liquidat: Rex Dieter today announced that there will be no KDE 4 for Fedora 8. That’s sad but understandable. But now I wonder where I will get my KDE 4 from.

Troubleshooting Linux Audio, Part 3b

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Journal: In this final section I'll present some MIDI-specific troubleshooting tips, along with a brief description of the setup here at StudioDave, a few closing remarks, and of course some links to the Linux music-maker du jour.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more