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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Windows vs. Open Source in 2007

Filed under
OSS

The open souce arena is forming a rather formidable fan following. In the beginning this was a small community known onl to a niche audience but today we see a different pisture. Commercial software and the the open source software seem to be at the same footing.

Book Review: Core Python Programming - 2nd Edition

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Reviews

I found the book titled "Core Python Programming" authored by Wesley.J.Chun and published by Prentice Hall to be an ideal book to learn the wonderful Python language. This book is quite voluminous, with 23 chapters spanning 1050 pages.

Bzflags: Kill or be killed

Filed under
Gaming

The aim of this article is to introduce the reader to Bzflags. Bzflags is a free software multiplayer 3D tank game that is frantic, full of immediate action, with a kill or be killed emphasis. The game is best served in multiplayer mode where you can hunt in packs, fight to the last ounce while chatting. Instant violent fun, gratification for those of you that need to let off steam and clear your minds living for the moment.

The Real Firefox-Killer

Filed under
Software

Firefox fans will be facing 2007 with more tranquillity than they did 2006. A year ago, it was clear that Firefox's free ride was about to end: after an astonishing five years of inactivity, Microsoft was finally launching an updated version of Internet Explorer.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install d4x Download manager in Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Tute Part 1
  • Pull in HDTV with Linux and the HD-5500
  • Clone Your Ubuntu installation
  • HowTo: Ubuntu home LAN server
  • Searching your world with Beagle
  • Disable Text Wrapping in Vim

The year of the Linux desktop!

Filed under
Linux

That the idea has been floated again does not surprise me. This is a year when Microsoft will be seeking to push a new version of its Windows operating system down consumers' throats. It's also a year when several GNU/Linux distributions can claim to be sufficiently desktop-oriented for the average person to have no problem using any one of them.

Exit Interview: Why Open Source Guru Left Novell

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

Jeremy Allison is a hero in the open source community these days. After spending two years at Novell, he decided to leave the Waltham, Mass.-based software company for reasons of principle right after the Linux-vendor signed a deal with Microsoft. Before he starts a new job at search engine Google Tuesday, Mr. Allison answered some questions from Red Herring.

Kubuntu 6.10 Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Kubuntu is a distribution which takes Ubuntu's base packages and adds to it the KDE desktop and a set of KDE applications. Although the two distributions are similar in many ways, their desktop and default set of applications are extremely different.

Distributing Software Modules Using rsync

Filed under
Software

Distributing software packages to all of our servers is a tedious task. Currently, a release manager makes a connection to each server and transfers files using ftp. This involves entering passwords multiple times, waiting for transfers to complete, changing directories, and keeping files organized. We developed a shell script that makes the job easier.

Straddling the Open Source/Proprietary Fence

Filed under
OSS

Given the jaw-dropping occurrences in the open source world last year (Red Hat’s acquisition of JBoss, Oracle’s announcement of “Unbreakable Linux,” and Novell’s patent pact with Microsoft, to name a few), InfoWorld’s Neil McAllister says balancing open and proprietary, commercial and free, will be the critical task for enterprise IT managers this year and for a time to follow.

U of R offers open source course

Filed under
OSS

Open source software is typically available for free and is set up so that programmers around the world can tinker with the code and make improvements. Now, the University of Regina has joined the fray, launching its first senior-level course in open source software development.

The Road to KDE 4: SVG Rendering in Applications

Filed under
KDE

Since KDE 4 development is in full swing with plans for a KDE 4.0 release sometime later this year, I thought I'd put together a weekly piece entitled The Road to KDE 4. The idea is to have a short overview of one or two of the features that show progress in KDE 4. For my first issue, the goal is to show off some of the great SVG work that has taken place so far.

New Year, New Look for PC-BSD 1.3

Filed under
BSD

Linux isn't the only open source operating system vying for the desktop; BSD in the form of the PC-BSD effort is too. The new PC-BSD also sports a new look and a new base system using the KDE 3.5.5 desktop.

Audi's new luxury cars engineered on Linux

Filed under
Linux

For several years, German automobile manufacturer Audi AG, a subsidiary of the Volkswagen Group, has been steadily migrating its engineering systems over to Linux. The company hopes to finish the job in 2007 and have the bulk of its servers and workstations running 64-bit Linux by the end of the year.

Migrating MII Server to Apache on Red Hat Linux

Filed under
HowTos

For people migrating from Windows to Linux, the Apache Web server is entirely different world from Microsoft Internet Information Server. Apache can be alienating to IIS / Windows administrators, because migrating to Apache is more than just copying files.

Also: ZENworks vs. Red Hat Network: Cost vs. flexibility

Linux software installation to improve

Filed under
Linux

Installing a new application on Linux can be challenging, even for experts. Now, the LSB (Linux Standard Base) project and its parent organization, the FSG (Free Standards Group), have a plan for how to make it easier for both users and developers.

January Issue of PCLinuxOS Magazine Available

Filed under
PCLOS

The 5th Issue of PCLinuxOS Magazine is online and ready to consume. This month's topics include: Creating an Update CD or DVD, Linux Users Owe Microsoft, Guide to Installing Diablo II LOD, Desktop Changes, and Partition Tables Explained.

Book review: OpenOffice.org 2 Guide

Filed under
Reviews

OpenOffice.org expert Solveig Haugland has published a massive new manual called the OpenOffice.org 2 Guide. This 520-page tome will be useful both for OOo newbies and power users who are interested in learning arcane features of the office suite.

XGI Technology Drivers Revisited

Filed under
Software

It has been one year to the day since XGI Technology had last released a Volari Linux display driver and about 14 months since we had first delivered word of XGI considering open-source 3D display drivers. Where do things now stand for XGI Technology? We will tell you all of the details today where things are for this Taiwan graphics company.

Open source personal tracking system gets first test

Filed under
Misc

An open source wireless tracking system for following people around buildings got its first public use last week at the Chaos Communication Congress in Berlin.

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More in Tux Machines

Canonical Patches Eight Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Just a few minutes ago, Canonical published multiple security advisories to inform the Ubuntu Linux community about the availability of new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu OSes, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus). Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Free Hadoop and Spark Training Options Spread Out
    In the tech job market race these days, hardly any trend is drawing more attention than Big Data. And, when talking Big Data, the subject of Hadoop inevitably comes up, but Spark is becoming an increasingly popular topic. IBM and other companies have made huge commitments to Spark, and workers who have both Hadoop and Spark skills are much in demand. With that in mind MapR Technologies and other providers are offering free Hadoop and Spark training. In many cases, the training is available online and on-demand, so you can learn at your own pace.
  • Git hooks, a cloud by the numbers, and more OpenStack news
    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.
  • Improving phpMyAdmin Docker container
    Since I've created the phpMyAdmin container for Docker I've always felt strange about using PHP's built in web server there. It really made it poor choice for any production setup and probably was causing lot of problems users saw with this container. During the weekend, I've changed it to use more complex setup with Supervisor, nginx and PHP FPM. As building this container is one of my first experiences with Docker (together with Weblate container), it was not as straightforward as I'd hope for, but in the end is seems to be working just fine. While touching the code, I've also improved testing of the Docker container to tests all supported setups and to better report in case of test fails.
  • Support open source motion comic
    There is an ongoing campaign for motion comic. It will be done entirely with FLOSS tools (Blender, Krita, GNU/Linux) and besides that, it really looks great (and no, it is not only for the kids!). Please support this effort if you can because it also shows the power of Free software tools. All will be released Creative Commons Atribution-ShareAlike license together with all sources.
  • GNU APL 1.6 released
    I am happy to announce that GNU APL 1.6 has been released.
  • Italian guide on government websites to be updated
    The source of the document is now available on GitHub, a cloud-based source code management system.
  • Ethiopia’s Lucy is Now Open Source: Famous Bones’ 3D Scans Released
    The world’s most famous fossil is now open source. 3D scans of Lucy — a 3.18-million-year-old hominin found in Ethiopia — were released on 29 August, allowing anyone to examine her arm, shoulder and knee bones and even make their own 3D-printed copies.s
  • How to use open source information to investigate stories online
    Myself and others at First Draft frequently receive emails from a whole range of people asking how they can start doing the sort of online open source investigation and verification that they’ve seen us doing. The skills and methodologies used are all something that can be learnt through a little persistence, but here are a few pieces of advice to get you started.
  • Microsoft relies on Wikipedia and loses Melbourne
    Microsoft’s Bing made the grave mistake on relying on data collected by Wikipedia for its mapping software and lost Melbourne. While Melbourne might not be the nicest it place to live, there were a fair few who felt that Bing Maps moving it to the wrong hemisphere was not exactly fair dinkum. Apparently Vole made the mistake when it collected the data. Ricky Brundritt, a senior program manager at Bing Maps, said that the outfit does not normally rely that much on Wackypedia, but sometimes it uses it.
  • Free education resources from Curriki and Sankoré wikis
    From the days of Gutenberg, technology has been linked to education. Curriki and Sankoré use open source to bring high-quality education to people who need it, and otherwise cannot access it.
  • You don't need a green thumb with this farming robot
    FarmBot is a robotic open hardware system that assists anyone with a small plot of land and a desire to grow food with planting, watering, soil testing, and weeding. It uses a Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and other awesome components, including weather-resistant materials.

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more