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About Tux Machines

Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu MATE 14.10 Alpha 2 Officially Released, Gets EFI Support and Ubuntu-Style Menus Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 8:13am
Story New Fedora Security, Linus Cartoon, and the Open Source Forest Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 8:07am
Story KDE Ships Release Candidate of Applications and Platform 4.14 Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 2:19am
Story Answering questions regarding the Fedora Security Team Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 1:05am
Story Linux-based home automation hub gains Android app Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 12:51am
Story Open-Source Space Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 12:46am
Story Zorin OS 9 - Linux for Windows users Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 12:39am
Story GSA CIO calls for open source to be considered first Roy Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 9:08pm
Story Mitro Releases a New Free & Open Source Password Manager Roy Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 9:05pm
Story Marvell lifts curtain on popular NAS SoCs Rianne Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 8:55pm

Compro Technology accused of GPL violation

Filed under
OSS

hexus.net: An eagle-eyed user of the Linux Kernel Mailing List archive, going by the name of Jo Shields (who many of you may know), has accused Compro Technology of violating the General Public License (GPL).

Does open source mandate change in copyright law?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: In their paper Money Ruins Everything, Australian law professor Dan Hunter and economist John Quiggin (right) argue that open source and Internet creativity mandate changes in copyright law, which now favor industries whose costs have disappeared.

Half way through UDS

Filed under
Ubuntu

jonobacon.org: Well, we are half way through the Ubuntu Developer Summit, and the week is going very, very well. We have been having some excellent, productive discussions, and are having a lot of fun in the evenings.

New Enhancements for Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Though the next major release of Red Hat's flagship Enterprise Linux is still likely more than a year away, Red Hat continues to offer incremental updates, with the latest delivering new features and support for both server and desktop users.

On the success of Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

the-gay-bar.com: Ubuntu, Canonical's linux distribution "for human beings" has been dominating the linux news and reports for a few years now: At first out of the "look at the freaky African rich guy who tried to build a distro" interest, then because blogs and other media started picking it up. Today Ubuntu is pretty much a synonym for linux for many people. Opensuse? What's that? Fedora? Never heard of it. Debian, Arch, Slackware, Gentoo? Words without meaning.

Microsoft to support ODF, PDF in Office next year

Filed under
Microsoft

infoworld.com: Microsoft is finally adding support for ODF (Open Document Format for XML) and Adobe PDF (Portable Document Format) to its Office productivity suite, the company is expected to announce late Wednesday.

Outside The Bubble

Filed under
Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: We in the open source community live in a bubble world. People live in an Ubuntu bubble or a Fedora bubble. Fedora 9 was just released and I, as an Ubuntu user, couldn’t care less. I don’t use Fedora, so the announcement of Fedora 9, does not resonate with me. Likewise, when Hardy Heron was released in April, Fedora users let out a collective yawn.

10 Linux Advantages for Your Business

Filed under
Linux

intranetjournal.com: For many computer users, the desire to find something more cost effective than Windows has been growing from a low growl to a loud roar. Obviously not everyone is a great candidate to make the switch to the open source operating system. Once you are able to better understand some of the strengths of using the Linux desktop, however, you too might find that migrating makes a lot sense.

No is Ark verdict

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Ark Linux is a distribution developed primarily for new Linux users, although its developers say experienced users should find it powerful enough to use as well. I've tested it before and found the later claim a bit overstated. Would version 2008.1, released this month, be a change for the better?

Dual-booting Fedora 9 and Xubuntu 8.04 on Macbook Pro

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Now that I have tried and tested F-9 on my 4th gen. Macbook Pro (Penryn), it's time for me to give you a concise summary of the Sulphur experience and how it compares to that of Hardy Heron.

Open source trumps Microsoft in UK schools

Filed under
OSS

theinquirer.net: MICROSOFT has suffered further set-backs in the UK education sector this week after Becta, the government procurement quango, reformed its purchasing regime to break the software giant's hold on education, and launched a programme to get schools to adopt open source software.

some howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Understanding Firewall Configurations

  • Tweak photos with Fotox
  • Moving Around With vim (keyboard short cuts)
  • Multimedia in Fedora 9 - VLC & Mplayer
  • Broadcom wifi (BCM4312) speedup to 54mbit/s on Ubuntu 8.04 on a HP nc6320 laptop
  • Displaying sorted list(size wise) of Files/Folder on Linux
  • Howto: Build a better dual boot
  • A Minimalist Firefox
  • QuickTip: Use Gnome Do as an ultrafast file manager
  • Fedora 9 GDM Theme

Asus Eee PC 901 spied on web... in black

Filed under
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: We saw leaked piccies of the white Atom-powered Eee PC 901 t'other week, but now it's the turn of the black version to find pictures of itself slip out of Asus and appear on the web.

Why Linux isn't yet ready for synchronized release cycles

Filed under
Linux

arstechnica.com: This model works well for many projects, particularly the GNOME desktop environment. One consequence of this model, however, is that it forces developers to work incrementally, and it discourages large-scale modifications.

OpenSSL and Debian: A Cautionary Tale

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: Hindsight is always 20/20, and it's easy to try to lay blame here. But instead, let's think about some principles that could help prevent such disasters in the future. It seems to me that there are three things that would have helped immensely in this case.

PHP Sucks, But It Doesn't Matter

Filed under
Software

codinghorror.com: I remember my first experience with PHP way back in 2001. Despite my questionable pedigree in ASP and Visual Basic, browsing an alphabetical PHP function list was enough to scare me away for years. Somehow, I don't think things have improved a whole lot since then.

Open source must co-op to win govt contracts

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.com.au: Open source players will need to swap baggy jeans for suits if they want to secure lucrative enterprise and government contracts, experts say.

'PatentGate,' one year later: Microsoft against the open-source world

Filed under
Microsoft

computerworld.com: It was just over a year ago that Microsoft Corp. dropped a bombshell of a claim: users of Linux and open-source software were unwittingly violating as many as 235 Microsoft software patents.

A New Goal for Open Source

Filed under
OSS

redhat.com: The attacking left forward fakes his body to the left as he gracefully slides to the right around his opponent. Dribbling carefully into position, he sizes up the Australian goalie. “What?!?

PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS

stephenstrail.blogspot: About 2 weeks ago, my wife discovered that her computer, running Ubuntu 8.04, would no longer read her digital cameras. As she was running the 64 bit version, and I was running the 32 on mine, I tried the cameras on my computer. No luck. What a disappointment! We had both happily been using Ubuntu for almost 2 years!

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Why Linus is right (as usual)
    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable. This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs. The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.
  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes
    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies. One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting
    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download. VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon. Why Vidcutter? If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily. VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.
  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More
    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases. The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.
  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows
    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux. It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.
  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements
    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes. MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

OSS Leftovers

  • Reveal.js presentation hacks
    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it. Reveal.js is an open source framework for creating presentations in HTML based on HTML5 and CSS. Ryan describes Gist-reveal.it, his project that makes it easier for users to create, fork, present, and share Reveal.js slides by using GitHub's Gist service as a datastore.
  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know
    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me, use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project. Graphic designers are experts in choosing fonts, but in this article I'll explore typefaces for everyone who isn't a professional designer.
  • Broader role essential for OpenStack Foundation, says Mirantis’ Renski
  • URSA Announces Name Change to Open Source Integrators to Reflect Their Full Spectrum of Open ERP Expertise
  • 2018 is Year for Open Source Software for Pentagon
    The US Pentagon is set to make a major investment in open source software, if section 886 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 is passed. The section acknowledges the use of open source software, the release of source code into public repositories, and a competition to inspire work with open source that supports the mission of the Department of Defense.
  • How startups save buckets of money on early software development
     

    Moving along, we have to segue with a short modularity lesson. More specifically, how modularity applies to software.

    Essentially, all products and services become cheaper and more plentiful when all the processes involved in production become modularised.

today's howtos