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About Tux Machines

Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 16/04/2011 - 5:03am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 16/04/2011 - 3:58am
Story New Look of the Ubuntu 11.04 Server Installer srlinuxx 15/04/2011 - 11:00pm
Story Firefox needs heavy hitter Linux power srlinuxx 15/04/2011 - 10:57pm
Story CentOS 5.6 Gnome Desktop Review srlinuxx 15/04/2011 - 9:02pm
Story What's Up With TransGaming srlinuxx 15/04/2011 - 9:00pm
Story An Ubuntu Adventure: srlinuxx 15/04/2011 - 8:58pm
Story Novell: we are among "top" contributors to Linux kernel srlinuxx 15/04/2011 - 6:39pm
Story Torvalds Honored by Gaggle of Lawyers srlinuxx 15/04/2011 - 6:36pm
Story Ubuntu 'Unity' Desktop Environment Second Impressions srlinuxx 15/04/2011 - 5:48pm

How To Compile A Kernel - The SuSE Way

Filed under
HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on SuSE systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.

Backup and Restore Your Ubuntu System using Sbackup

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HowTos

Data can be lost in different ways some of them are because of hardware failures,you accidentally delete or overwrite a file. Some data loss occurs as a result of natural disasters and other circumstances beyond your control. Now we will see a easy backup and restore tool called “sbackup”

Howto Bypass Ubuntu Login Screen

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

I think many of you who has installed Ubuntu, must hava encountered a login screen before you actually can use the Ubuntu desktop. However there’s a way to enable automatic login to your desktop and completely bypass the login screen.

Open source start-ups speak out

Filed under
OSS

Entrepreneurs attending a recent forum in Germany showed how they plan to use clever open source products — commercially — to compete with proprietary software companies.

Vim Tips & Tricks

Filed under
HowTos

You can execute the vim command, while opening files with vim with option -c. While I wanna replace a string from a huge file, first I need to check whether I can do it with sed or not. That means my replace string must be unique, so that it won’t affect others line thatI might not want to replace.

Racoon Roadwarrior Configuration

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Racoon Roadwarrior is a client that uses unknown, dynamically assigned IP addresses to connect to a VPN gateway (in this case also firewall). This is one of the most interesting and today most needed scenarios in business environment. This tutorial shows how to configure Racoon Roadwarrior.

http://www.howtoforge.com/racoon_roadwarrior_vpn

Authenticating on the network

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HowTos

Usually, I get annoyed at having to authenticate myself to each and every service I set up; after all, my passwords are the same everywhere, since I make sure of that myself. On Windows, I wouldn’t have to do that; once I log in, Windows is able to communicate credentials to each and every service that asks for them. But something similar is impossible on GNU/Linux, right? Wrong.

GNOME Interface for YUM: 0.1.5

Filed under
Software

This is the first time for me to hear about gnome-yum, the GNOME interface for YUM, by András Tóth. Version 0.1.5 was just released on Nov. 16, and it doesn't bring much of a change over the older 0.1.2.

Thieves steal thousands from Portland non-profit

Filed under
Misc

Thieves broke into a non-profit that builds computers for people who can't afford them, stealing about $4,500 worth of hardware early Saturday. "Keep an eye out for laptops for sale in Portland loaded with Ubuntu Linux: if you see one of these, please call us! "

how to check the CPU and mem usage of current running process?

Filed under
HowTos

We may curious some times why our computer running so slow, and we suspect that must be some programs (process) is running and uses a lots of CPU. We wanna know which process is it, and we have top. But some how top is not so interactive, where there is another program call htop.

Adventures in a New Ubuntu 6.10 Install: Day 5

Filed under
Ubuntu

Since my last post in this series, I’ve been busy customizing the look and feel of Ubuntu, which I find is the funnest part of using Ubuntu! There are so many options and themes and icons and window borders and wallpapers…

PCLinuxOS - perfect halfway house

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

It's been quite the dilemma over recent months as to which Linux distro is the best choice for users moving away from XP (or "windoze" as it's affectionately labelled by some in the community). Instinctively the majority of users looked to Ubuntu and the user-friendliness of the gnome environment but it was brought to my attention that there's another major player in this exchange, a plucky little distro called PCLinuxOS, and here are my thoughts on it.

Mandriva Free 2007 - the FOSSwire review

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MDV
Reviews

I’m going to take a look at the popular Linux distribution Mandriva; more specifically, their latest free-of-charge desktop outing Mandriva Free 2007.

Using Unbuntu Christian Edition - a Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The last time I saw this distribution discussed it degenerated quickly into a flame war that had nothing to do with the merits of the distribution. Recently I saw that there was an update to the distribution. I had a bit of time so I thought I would take it for a spin and see what it was actually like. While this review is brief I hope to cover the major features that differentiate this distribution from Ubuntu its parent distribution and rate its overall usefulness.

Means and ends in open source

Filed under
OSS

One thing that makes analysis of business strategies in open source difficult (even for professionals) is a confusion of means and ends.

Get Crontab Output in Ubuntu via E-mail

Filed under
HowTos

Having troubles getting your crontab’s output in Ubuntu? Constantly checking your email for a non-existent email? Turns out you might just be missing a message.

Windows vs GNU/Linux vs MacOSX - the showdown

Filed under
OS

I’ve been a Windows user since Windows 3.1, a Desktop GNU/Linux user since August and a MacOSX user for some weeks. I will share with you what I was able to learn from my experience with these operative systems.

Kill Process with Care

Filed under
HowTos

A lots of people likes to do kill -9, which means kill a process by force. By specified -9, process will be terminated by force, which is very fast and confirm kill but it leaves hidden side effects. Refers to Useless use of kill -9, kill a process by specified -9 may leave child processes of a parent orphaned, temporary files open, shared memory segments active, and sockets busy. This leaves the system in a messy state, and could lead to unanticipated and hard to debug problems.

Ubuntu to add proprietary drivers

Filed under
Ubuntu

Analysis -- Reluctantly, the Ubuntu developer community has decided that with the next version of Ubuntu, Feisty Fawn, it will be including some proprietary drivers. Feisty Fawn's emphasis on "multimedia enablement" appears to be the culprit.

Also: Linux desktop domination "just a matter of time"

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