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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 22 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AMD Catalyst vs. Radeon Gallium3D On Linux 3.1 srlinuxx 13/10/2011 - 6:31pm
Story Demystifying Back-ups srlinuxx 13/10/2011 - 6:29pm
Story Relishing the name srlinuxx 13/10/2011 - 6:23pm
Story I take it back. Unity is cool. srlinuxx 13/10/2011 - 6:18pm
Story Dreamy Ubuntu 11.10, the Oneiric Ocelot, slinks into view srlinuxx 13/10/2011 - 5:34pm
Story Do Volunteer Programmers Produce Better Code? srlinuxx 13/10/2011 - 5:33pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 13/10/2011 - 10:08am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 13/10/2011 - 9:54am
Story Changing Desktop Appearance On Linux Mint 11 (Advanced) falko 13/10/2011 - 7:53am
Story Ubuntu 11.10 Is DevOps Distilled srlinuxx 13/10/2011 - 7:10am

Special Characters made easier in Ubuntu

Filed under

If you are using Ubuntu Dapper Drake, you could press CTRL+SHIFT and then the unicode for special characters so you didn’t have to copy and paste them from the Character palette every time you wanted to use them.

Solution 1

If you are using Edgy this will not work any more here is simple tip how to use Special Characters.You need to use compose key

OpenOffice: More Pros Than Cons

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The most obvious pro of (the official name for the software) is that it's free.

OpenOffice is an ongoing project developed collaboratively by users and developers around the globe. They make their handiwork available online at no cost to anyone who wants it, including individuals, employers and schools.

Consensus Approval

Steps to manually mount a USB flash drive in GNU/Linux

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I recently got hold of a 1 GB USB memory stick. But when I tried to mount it in a bare bones Linux distribution (a distribution which has just enough software as is needed), it was not mounted automatically. This is because the auto mounting takes place by means of a program known as hotplug which detects the USB device that is inserted in real time and then mounts it in the desired location.

Linux Desktop – Is it an Option for Normal Users?

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Linux has long held the promise of offering normal users an alternative to Windows. With the arrival of the high priced Windows Vista Support Alert subscriber "Briard" decides to put 12 Linux distros to the test.


Novell BrainShare 2007 Preview

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When Novell's BrainShare users' show opens its doors this Sunday, Microsoft will be on hand for the first time ever. With and without this controversial, recently minted partner, Novell will issue announcements around SUSE Linux in areas that include products, training, and new customer wins, say company sources.

Top Drupal & CiviCRM Gotchas

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Thinking of trying the Drupal open source content management system?

Festival: Linux Text-To-Speech

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Festival is a free software for speech synthesis, it is distributed under an X11-type licence allowing unrestricted commercial and non-commercial use alike.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Open Source Flash Library Now Plays YouTube Videos

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Benjamin Otte has Swfdec working with YouTube. Swfdec is a library for decoding and rendering Flash animations. It is still in heavy development. The intended audience are developers or people using it for pretested Flash animations (think embedded here). If you use it on unknown content, expect it to have issues and don't be surprised if it crashes.

The More Things Change

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Sometimes you just look at things and realize that they are just plain funny.

That was what ran through my mind this week when I saw this headline from Computer Business Review: "HSBC Signs Up for Microsoft's SUSE Linux Support." The double-take took a bit to settle in, because for a second I wondered if Microsoft actually owned SUSE Linux now.

K3b 1.0 Released

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I am proud to announce the release of K3b 1.0. After years and years of development, all the sweat (actually in the summer it can get sticky in front of the screen), all the tears (ok, admittedly, not that many), and all the countless hours I spent on a single application finally we have what I think is worth the big 1.

Gentoo's Proposed Code of Conduct Adopted

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In no small part due to the wide exposure of a high-profile article published earlier in the week on in-fighting and other disgraceful behaviors from developers and contributors, Gentoo announced a proposed Code of Conduct.

Slower, safer rollouts ahead for Firefox bug fixes

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Mozilla Corp. is changing the way it publishes security fixes for its Firefox browser.

Over the next day, the open-source company plans to begin delivering bug fixes to a select group of beta testers who will try out the upcoming Firefox version before it is released to all Firefox users.

Beryl: Eye Candy For the Linux Desktop

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Ever wanted to take the window open on your desktop and set it on fire? If you happen to be running Linux, you're in luck.

Jaw-dropping 3D desktop effects first came to the Linux desktop by way of the Novell sponsored Compiz effort which got started over a year ago.

A Long Time Ago, In a Wiki Far, Far Away

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The Star Wars Saga carries arguably the largest fan base of any one particular work of fiction. Fanboys and uber-geeks have made the Internet their platform to engage in endless debates surrounding topics such as the exact specifications of the X-Wing Starfighter to whether or not the destruction of the first Death Star was an inside job.

The Intrepid Investigator Report -- Sniffing Powdered Ubuntu CDs Cures Cancer!

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The Intrepid Investigator

Ubuntu Cures Cancer
by reporter Ursula Upton
filed: 16 March 2007 at 13:52.

Yes, it's a genuine miracle. In a scientific study by reputable scientists Borg Benderle and Lamer DiDiot (both affiliated with Shuttlecock University), the study found that sniffing powdered Ubuntu CDs brings about a dramatic reduction in the size of cancer tumors.

Affinity - GNOME desktop search tool

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Affinity is a front end desktop search tool that uses Beagle or Tracker as backend desktop search engine. Some of the current features in Affinity are:

* Front-end to both the Beagle & Tracker desktop search engines.
* Has actions (configurable through Desktop files), which speeds up common tasks.

Learning GIMP - Part 1

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GIMP a.k.a. GNU Image Manipulation Program is a 100% free software created to view and edit almost all image formats out there. Not only that it is the best FREE photo editor, it is also compatible with many operating systems like Linux, Windows or Mac OS X and translated into many languages.

Become a digital video editing guru using Linux tools

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Shooting, editing, and producing video clips has been my passion for about 10 years. As a free software adept, I always tried to perform this process on Linux. This year I have finally found a set of tools that work for me. This article provides a brief tutorial on home video production.

Slightly changed openSUSE 10.2 ISOs released

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today we are releasing slightly changed openSUSE 10.2 ISO images. The reason for putting out those updated ISOs is a license issue, which had to be addressed. The following ISOs have be replaced on the mirrors:

* openSUSE-10.2-GM-Addon-NonOSS-BiArch.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-Addon-NonOSS-ppc.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-DVD-i386.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-DVD-ppc.iso

Installing OpenSSL Support for Ruby on Ubuntu

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The more I work with Ubuntu, the more I think it’s a very good desktop, but not a good development machine. For instance, you can install Ruby 1.8.4 from the package management system, but not 1.8.5 (or 1.8.6 which is now the latest). So you’re stuck compiling ruby on your own.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.8.4

I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.4 kernel. And yeah, sorry about the quicker releases, I'll be away tomorrow and as they seem to have passed all of the normal testing, I figured it would be better to get them out earlier instead of later. And I like releasing stuff on this date every year... All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at: git:// linux-4.8.y and can be browsed at the normal git web browser: Read more Also: Linux 4.7.10 Linux 4.4.27

New Releases: Budgie, Solus, SalentOS, and Slackel

  • Open-Source Budgie Desktop Sees New Release
    The pet parakeet of the Linux world, Budgie has a new release available for download. in this post we lookout what's new and tell you how you can get it.
  • Solus Linux Making Performance Gains With Its BLAS Configuration
    - Those making use of the promising Solus Linux distribution will soon find their BLAS-based workloads are faster. Solus developer Peter O'Connor tweeted this week that he's found some issues with the BLAS linking on the distribution and he's made fixes for Solus. He also mentioned that he uncovered these BLAS issues by using our Phoronix Test Suite benchmarking software.
  • SalentOS “Luppìu” 1.0 released!
    With great pleasure the team announces the release of SalentOS “Luppìu” 1.0.
  • Slackel "Live kde" 4.14.21
    This release is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, while the 64-bit iso supports booting on UEFI systems. The 64-bit iso images support booting on UEFI systems. The 32-bit iso images support both i686 PAE SMP and i486, non-PAE capable systems. Iso images are isohybrid.

Security News

  • Free tool protects PCs from master boot record attacks [Ed: UEFI has repeatedly been found to be both a detriment to security and enabler of Microsoft lock-in]
    Cisco's Talos team has developed an open-source tool that can protect the master boot record of Windows computers from modification by ransomware and other malicious attacks. The tool, called MBRFilter, functions as a signed system driver and puts the disk's sector 0 into a read-only state. It is available for both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows versions and its source code has been published on GitHub. The master boot record (MBR) consists of executable code that's stored in the first sector (sector 0) of a hard disk drive and launches the operating system's boot loader. The MBR also contains information about the disk's partitions and their file systems. Since the MBR code is executed before the OS itself, it can be abused by malware programs to increase their persistence and gain a head start before antivirus programs. Malware programs that infect the MBR to hide from antivirus programs have historically been known as bootkits -- boot-level rootkits. Microsoft attempted to solve the bootkit problem by implementing cryptographic verification of the bootloader in Windows 8 and later. This feature is known as Secure Boot and is based on the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) -- the modern BIOS.
  • DDOS Attack On Internet Infrastructure
    I hope somebody's paying attention. There's been another big DDOS attack, this time against the infrastructure of the Internet. It began at 7:10 a.m. EDT today against Dyn, a major DNS host, and was brought under control at 9:36 a.m. According to Gizmodo, which was the first to report the story, at least 40 sites were made unreachable to users on the US East Coast. Many of the sites affected are among the most trafficed on the web, and included CNN, Twitter, PayPal, Pinterest and Reddit to name a few. The developer community was also touched, as GitHub was also made unreachable. This event comes on the heels of a record breaking 620 Gbps DDOS attack about a month ago that brought down security expert Brian Krebs' website, KrebsonSecurity. In that attack, Krebs determined the attack had been launched by botnets that primarily utilized compromised IoT devices, and was seen by some as ushering in a new era of Internet security woes.
  • This Is Why Half the Internet Shut Down Today [Update: It’s Getting Worse]
    Twitter, Spotify and Reddit, and a huge swath of other websites were down or screwed up this morning. This was happening as hackers unleashed a large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on the servers of Dyn, a major DNS host. It’s probably safe to assume that the two situations are related.
  • Major DNS provider Dyn hit with DDoS attack
    Attacks against DNS provider Dyn continued into Friday afternoon. Shortly before noon, the company said it began "monitoring and mitigating a DDoS attack" against its Dyn Managed DNS infrastructure. The attack may also have impacted Managed DNS advanced service "with possible delays in monitoring."
  • What We Know About Friday’s Massive East Coast Internet Outage
    Friday morning is prime time for some casual news reading, tweeting, and general Internet browsing, but you may have had some trouble accessing your usual sites and services this morning and throughout the day, from Spotify and Reddit to the New York Times and even good ol’ For that, you can thank a distributed denial of service attack (DDoS) that took down a big chunk of the Internet for most of the Eastern seaboard. This morning’s attack started around 7 am ET and was aimed at Dyn, an Internet infrastructure company headquartered in New Hampshire. That first bout was resolved after about two hours; a second attack began just before noon. Dyn reported a third wave of attacks a little after 4 pm ET. In all cases, traffic to Dyn’s Internet directory servers throughout the US—primarily on the East Coast but later on the opposite end of the country as well—was stopped by a flood of malicious requests from tens of millions of IP addresses disrupting the system. Late in the day, Dyn described the events as a “very sophisticated and complex attack.” Still ongoing, the situation is a definite reminder of the fragility of the web, and the power of the forces that aim to disrupt it.
  • Either IoT will be secure or the internet will be crippled forever
    First things first a disclaimer. I neither like nor trust the National Security Agency (NSA). I believe them to be mainly engaged in economic spying for the corporate American empire. Glenn Greenwald has clearly proven that in his book No Place to Hide. At the NSA, profit and power come first and I have no fucking clue as to how high they prioritize national security. Having said that, the NSA should hack the Internet of (insecure) Things (IoT) to death. I know Homeland Security and the FBI are investigating where the DDoS of doomsday proportions is coming from and the commentariat is already screaming RUSSIA! But it is really no secret what is enabling this clusterfuck. It’s the Mirai botnet. If you buy a “smart camera” from the Chinese company Hangzhou XiongMai Technologies and do not change the default password, it will be part of a botnet five minutes after you connect it to the internet. We were promised a future where we would have flying cars but we’re living in a future where camera’s, light-bulbs, doorbells and fridges can get you in serious trouble because your home appliances are breaking the law.
  • IoT at the Network Edge
    Fog computing, also known as fog networking, is a decentralized computing infrastructure. Computing resources and application services are distributed in logical, efficient places at any points along the connection from the data source (endpoint) to the cloud. The concept is to process data locally and then use the network for communicating with other resources for further processing and analysis. Data could be sent to a data center or a cloud service. A worthwhile reference published by Cisco is the white paper, "Fog Computing and the Internet of Things: Extend the Cloud to Where the Things Are."
  • Canonical now offers live kernel patching for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users
    Canonical has announced its ‘Livepatch Service’ which any user can enable on their current installations to eliminate the need for rebooting their machine after installing an update for the Linux kernel. With the release of Linux 4.0, users have been able to update their kernel packages without rebooting, however, Ubuntu will be the first distribution to offer this feature for free.
  • ​The Dirty Cow Linux bug: A silly name for a serious problem
    Dirty Cow is a silly name, but it's a serious Linux kernel problem. According to the Red Hat bug report, "a race condition was found in the way the Linux kernel's memory subsystem handled the copy-on-write (COW) breakage of private read-only memory mappings. An unprivileged local user could use this flaw to gain write access to otherwise read-only memory mappings and thus increase their privileges on the system."
  • Ancient Privilege Escalation Bug Haunts Linux
  • October 21, 2016 Is Dirty COW a serious concern for Linux?
  • There is a Dirty Cow in Linux
  • Red Hat Discovers Dirty COW Archaic Linux Kernel Flaw Exploited In The Wild
  • Linux kernel bug being exploited in the wild
  • Update Linux now: Critical privilege escalation security flaw gives hackers full root access
  • Linux kernel bug: DirtyCOW “easyroot” hole and what you need to know
  • 'Most serious' Linux privilege-escalation bug ever discovered
  • New 'Dirty Cow' vulnerability threatens Linux systems
  • Serious Dirty Cow Linux Vulnerability Under Attack
  • Easy-to-exploit rooting flaw puts Linux PCs at risk
  • Linux just patched a vulnerability it's had for 9 years
  • Dirty COW Linux vulnerability has existed for nine years
  • 'Dirty Cow' Linux Vulnerability Found
  • 'Dirty Cow' Linux Vulnerability Found After Nine Years
  • FakeFile Trojan Opens Backdoors on Linux Computers, Except openSUSE
    Malware authors are taking aim at Linux computers, more precisely desktops and not servers, with a new trojan named FakeFile, currently distributed in live attacks. Russian antivirus vendor Dr.Web discovered this new trojan in October. The company's malware analysts say the trojan is spread in the form of an archived PDF, Microsoft Office, or OpenOffice file.

today's howtos