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Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

The commie smear against open source

Filed under
OSS

There are days on this beat when I fear I'm covering politics, not business. It happens when the proprietary companies trot out their FUD that open source is somehow socialist, communist, as pink as its programmers' underwear.

Also: Does open source have a political agenda?

9 Tips to diagnose remote GNU/Linux server network connectivity issues

Filed under
HowTos

Many new admin or Linux users get frustrated when their remote Linux box is not accessible dues to network connectivity. In this article I will try to provide tools and information about how to diagnose network configurations. You can try these tips/tools to diagnose an issue of Linux network connectivity to remote or local servers.

Shortcut Keys You Might Not Know About

Filed under
HowTos

Today’s tutorial might be a bit quick, but that fits along with the tips included. Speed up your work by using keyboard shortcut keys. Below I’ve listed some of the shortcut keys I use within during my day-to-day.

konqueror not vanishing. news at 11

Filed under
KDE

really didn't want to blog again today, but then i read that "we may see konqueror vanish" due to dolphin being in kdebase. some other sites picked this up, of course, because it's sensational. like many sensational headlines, it's also wrong.

Stable Linux Kernel 2.6.20.1 Released

Filed under
Linux

Greg KH and the -stable team have released the latest 2.6.20 series stable kernel. This bug-fix contains a single patch to fix a free wrong pointer bug in nfs/acl server support.

Jump into JUnit 4

Filed under
News

This tutorial guides you step-by-step through the fundamental concepts of JUnit 4, with emphasis on the new Java 5 annotations.

Xfce 4.4: The best lightweight desktop environment

Filed under
Software

For years, the lightweight Xfce has been a popular desktop environment for Linux distributions running on older hardware, thanks to its lower demand on resources as compared to KDE and GNOME; it's an ideal desktop for machines with less than 256MB of memory. Until recently, however, using Xfce was a little laborious, but with its latest release last month, Xfce is a much more usable desktop environment.

Ubuntu spurns Microsoft's advances

Filed under
Ubuntu

Products evolve and mature. Sometimes they even get better. So when I installed Vista, I thought it would only be fair if I also downloaded the latest version of Ubuntu, burned it onto CD and installed it on another machine.

How Novell Saved Millions With Open Source

Filed under
SUSE

How much money can a large enterprise save by migrating to open source from proprietary? In Novell's case, it's millions of dollars.

Ten Leading Open Source Innovators

Filed under
OSS

In the past, any open-source discussion centered on Linux, but now that Linux is a mature, stable operating system, the real innovation is happening elsewhere. As Illuminata analyst Gordon Haff notes, what’s most interesting is what happens when the open-source push collides with other technology trends. With those points in mind, here are ten leading commercial open-source innovators and the projects they’re working on.

A Windows Fanboy's Foray Into Linux: Fedora Core 6

Filed under
Reviews

Because of all my horrific previous experiences with distros from RedHat, I was really dreading the whole experience (and the response my review would provoke). But, to my chagrin, RedHat has cleaned up their act considerably.

A look at Slackware's package utilities

Filed under
Linux

Slackware Linux is the oldest surviving Linux distribution. Late last year the project marked 13 years of non-stop development with the release of Slackware 11.0. The distribution is best known for its no-frills, minimum customizations approach to applications like KDE. It's also notorious for its reluctance to switch to new version of several popular applications like Apache or GCC. No surprise then, that its package management system has seen little change over the years and is still available in just one flavor -- vanilla.

A good Linux kernel book for aspiring nerds

Filed under
Linux

It's time for me to come clean. I'm a Linux poseur. But a new Linux book, Greg Kroah-Hartman's Linux Kernel in a Nutshell, could help people like me get some real technical chops.

KDE at SCALE 5x

Filed under
KDE

KDE was once again well represented at the 2007 Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE 5x), demonstrating to show-goers why it is the most popular Linux desktop. There were talks, demonstrations from KDE developers and and thank yous in return.

OpenOffice 2.1

Filed under
Software

Lots of folks on the FOSS side of things tout OpenOffice (OO) as an alternative to Microsoft Office (M)). The basic argument is that OO, for basic functionality, is every bit as good as MO, but without the cost. Here's an example where OO fails to provide anything near the quality of MO.

The ‘Open' Tower of Babel

Filed under
Software

According to the Bible, there was a time when all those on earth spoke one language. And humanity, united by one language, started building the Tower of Babel to reach the heavens. As this was open defiance against God's wishes, He thought that the best way to stop these efforts would be to create confusion between humans by making everybody speak different languages so that no one could understand each other. But in the world of open source, GNOME and KDE are serving as the ‘open' tower of Babel.

The Participation Culture

Filed under
OSS

I am lurking on the OpenMoko mailing lists. This is an educational experience for me. Although I have participated in many heated discussions concerning Free software, I have never watched such a high-profile full-fledged Free software project start from the ground up. It's fascinating watching different sorts of geeks interact.

GNOME, KDE: Can't We All Just Get Along?

Filed under
Software

What is wrong with KDE 3.x? What is wrong with GNOME 2.8+? These seem to be the two questions arising from the recent revival of Linus vs. GNOME spat.

Book Review: Ubuntu Hacks

Filed under
Reviews

I recently got hold of a very nice book on Ubuntu called Ubuntu Hacks. Put in a nutshell, this book is a collection of around 100 tips and tricks which the authors choose to call hacks, which explain how to accomplish various tasks in Ubuntu Linux. The so called hacks range from down right ordinary to the other end of the spectrum of doing specialised things.

Yes Virginia, you can run Beryl alone

Filed under
HowTos

This post here and this one here got me thinking. The question — an often-asked one, I might add — is whether or not Fluxbox (or Openbox, for that matter) can run with the Beryl framework.

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Blender 2.78 Open-Source 3D Graphics Software Released with Spherical Stereo VR

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