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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 418 srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 4:27pm
Story Debunking popular open source myths srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 4:25pm
Story 10 Linux Server Distros That Could Save You a Bundle srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 4:19pm
Story Android vendors lose the Linux rights srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 4:18pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 6:27am
Story Which languages are people writing Plasmoids in? srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 3:32am
Story WattOS R4 – An alternative to Lubuntu srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 3:30am
Story Multitasking with X and Linux srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 3:29am
Story The Age of the Icon Is Full Upon Us srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 3:26am
Story Quickly booting C64 games in Linux mcasperson 15/08/2011 - 1:05am

One ring to rule them all … xcompmgr, transset-df and 3ddesktop

Filed under
Software

A year ago (actually about 15 months, if memory serves), before Beryl and before Compiz, 3ddesktop was a popular toy. It doesn’t compare to a full-scale Beryl rig with all the bells and whistles, but it’s light enough not to need extraordinary hardware and easy enough to set up that it doesn’t need much explanation.

DREAMLINUX : Not Quiet a Dream but still Good

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The number of linux distributions just keeps on increasing every now and then a new distro pops up claiming to be different from other but most of them are remarkably similar. However Dreamlinux was one distro i was highly impressed with.

My Desktop Arcade Revival - part 1

Filed under
Gaming

I was recently thrilled to discover XMAME. XMAME is the Unix/Linux port of MAME, the Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator. It installs and runs without a hitch on an average Linux setup, and may even have a package ready for your system. But getting XMAME isn't enough; you need ROMs. Some ROMs come with the software in packages that I've tried.

See the total lunar eclipse on March 3, 2007

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Without a total eclipse in almost two-and-one-half years, sky gazers will be able to observe a total lunar eclipse on Saturday, March 3, 2007 from the eastern Americas, the United Kingdom, Europe, Africa, Iceland, Greenaldn, Arctic, the Middle East in western Asia.

Can Open Source Apps Find Strength in Numbers?

Filed under
OSS

Observations I drew from this week's LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Summit are that (1) location does matter, in both physical and market space and (2) some people have a strange notion of what constititues an IT solution. Regarding market space – namely how to go about creating some – the interesting news at the summit was the annoucement of a new Open Solutions Alliance.

Open Source Festival, Envisage '07

Filed under
OSS

The Institute of Informatics and Communication, University of Delhi South Campus, has announced its second annual inter-collegiate open source technical festival, Envisage '07 to be held on 24-25th February 2007.

Special Purpose Network Addresses Every System admin need to know

Filed under
HowTos

Different types of Classes of Network

Class A Addresses
Class A address must be between 0 and 127
network.node.node.node

A dvd::rip Tip

Filed under
HowTos

After my previous post on dvd::rip, I continued to experiment with batch processing that would allow me to have titles from multiple DVD's in the queue at the same time. Fortunately, the method didn't take long to discover and before long I was up and running more efficiently than I ever had been before. Here's how I did it.

The Bottom Line of Hardware

Filed under
OSS

An open source developer schedules a meeting with a hardware vendor. The purpose of the meeting is to request that the vendor consider releasing the driver support for their products (we'll call them Widgets) to open source. "Why should we, Widgetmaker, want to do that?"

Also: NDAd Drivers Don't Make Everyone Happy

The end of something

Filed under
MDV

So, that's it, warly is gone (from Mandriva). Tonight, we had his departure party, which was really nice, it's probably the best celebration we have done for months: almost all the company was here, even sage gurus and missed co-workers that left the company came back to "celebrate" the event with us.

A quick review of Knoppix 5.1, part 2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

It's impossible to write a decent review of any complex distribution, let alone Knoppix. These few posts are a quick pass at features that caught my eye while I had Knoppix up and running. This time I'm going to look at two IDEs, Eclipse and MonoDevelop.

Configuring OpenOffice.org Writer

Filed under
HowTos

Like other OpenOffice.org applications, Writer has dozens of options available from Tools > Options > OpenOffice.org Writer. These options allow you to adjust both the general settings of Writer and specific options for different kinds of formatting. Many are ideal for desktop publishing, and a similar set of options is available for web documents under Tools > Options > OpenOffice.org Writer/Web.

LinuxWorld: It's About The Apps (Dummy)!

Filed under
Linux

Open source is more than just Linux. It's more than just infrastructure and it can save you money. These were some of the messages to float out of the LinuxWorld Open Solutions Summit in New York this week.

Interoperability, choice and Open XML – spot the odd one out

Filed under
OSS

Microsoft have published an open letter entitled "Interoperability, Choice and Open XML". I often like to think that I am never surprised by the exaggerations, obfuscations and general untruths that come out of Microsoft: this letter shows their capacity of doing just that.

The Pillars of KDE 4: Decibel Definitions and Benefits

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KDE

In part 1, we gave a general overview of Decibel. In part 2, we cover everyone's favorite section - the definitions! Well, at least we hope that the definitions will be informative. Part 3 will describe some benefits for developers while part 4 deals with benefits for users.

Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn Herd 4 Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

A new test (Herd) release is now available from the Ubuntu camp. This is the fourth testing release in the road to Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn this April. In today's screenshots we show off a few of the changes in this release along with the improved Ubuntu Hardware Database.

Downloading wallpapers the easy way in KDE

Filed under
HowTos

KDE has an easy way to download and install wallpapers from KDE-look.org. Here are the steps:

RPM development on the road to revival

Filed under
Software

The RPM Package Manager (RPM) package format and utilities are the backbone of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), Fedora Core, SUSE, and Mandriva Linux distributions, a host of smaller distros, and the Linux Standard Base. For years, the RPM utilities and specification were maintained by Red Hat. That changed in 2006 when, following a lengthy period of uncertainty, the company relaunched rpm.org as an independent hub for RPM development.

Mandriva Flash 2007: the unexpected gift

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

With the current technologies, a 2 GB USB stick is not expensive. This is why Mandriva thought of releasing Mandriva Flash on December 7, and they have chosen a high-quality 2 GB USB stick as a medium for it. I have recently received a complimentary Mandriva Flash for reviewing. I have used it for a few days, and here's what my experiences were.

Opera code names uncovered

Filed under
Software

We've had some requests lately about where Opera 9.x is heading, so I'll give you a sneak peak into the current projects and their internal code names. We usually prefer code names over version numbers until the product actually ships.

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more