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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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How To Resize ext3 Partitions Without Losing Data

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This article is about resizing ext3 partitions without losing data. It shows how to shrink and enlarge existing ext3 partitions and how to merge two ext3 partitions. This can be quite useful if you do not use LVM and you realize that your existing partitioning does not meet your actual needs anymore.

Accounting Vendors Block Linux Server Use

Filed under
Linux

We all know Microsoft views Linux as a serious threat and will do just about anything to discourage its use. But why would application vendors who actually face competition from Microsoft help it out in this regard? That's what one reader was wondering after discovering that his customers could no longer use a Linux server with their favorite accounting packages.

Hands on with the Nokia N800

Filed under
Hardware

At this week's Consumer Electronics Show, Nokia introduced the Nokia N800 Internet Tablet, the successor to the Nokia 770. The N800 is more than a beefed-up 770, as it adds a few features not available on the first device. I had a chance to spend about an hour with Nokia's N800 team and get a feel for how the $399/€399 N800 stacks up against its predecessor yesterday at CES and it looks promising.

Open-source system helps victims cope with disasters

Filed under
OSS

VICTIMS of natural disasters will be the first to say that the aftermath of a major flood, earthquake or landslide is a disaster in itself. There is the extreme difficulty of finding the missing and recovering the dead. The victims of the landslide that buried Barangay Guinsaugon in St. Bernard, Southern Leyte, however, had a relatively easier time dealing with their crisis. This is due to the cooperation between IBM Philippines and the National Disaster Coordinating Council.

Red Hat's Fedora project unites Core and Extras efforts

Filed under
Linux

The Fedora Linux project, which is sponsored by Red Hat Inc and provides the core code for its Linux distributions, is set for a reorganization that will unite its Core and Extras package efforts.

10 Signs you've been using Firefox too long...

Filed under
Humor

1. You sit right next to a window but you still just look at your ForecastFox icon to see what it's like outside.

2. You fumble with the TV remote for a minute before remembering that you can't open another channel in a new tab.

KDE 4: Sonnet

Filed under
KDE

The KDE promotion teams gains momentum with the weekly “The Road to KDE 4″ news. Hidden in this weeks release about Koffice you will find some words about Sonnet - the KSpell replacement and therefore the framework that will support you with spell checking.

License compliance issues could affect all BSD-derived distributions

Filed under
Legal

The Gentoo/FreeBSD project, which combines the FreeBSD kernel with Gentoo Linux design principles, is in a fix. Its lead developer, Diego "Flameeyes" Pettenò, discovered licensing issues while working on the libkvm library and the start-stop-daemon -- and Pettenò says that the problem might not be limited to his project, but could trap other BSD-derived projects as well.

Elive rl2 -- Call it what you want Elive makes Enlightenment work

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

There is always something interesting afloat in my email box. I had been working with my new laptop to get another second timer Elive to work, which came out on Christmas day. Elive, the distro named as the fastest climber on distrowatch for 2006, was one of my favorite suprises and one where I truly ended up leaving a distro on my laptop until it died later in the year. So once I published the Dream, of course I get a couple of emails letting me know that Elive also had a great new release out and where was my updated review?

Linux Invades CES: Toys and joys the Linux way

Filed under
Linux

The 2007 International Consumer Electronic Show is one of the ultimate tech-toy and gadget shows on the planet. There's something for nearly anyone, and while not quite a household word, Linux technology has gained rapid stature in the consumer-electronics industry, as demonstrated by vastly increased cognizance of both Linux users and Linux embedded technology.

Microsoft, Novell and Unintended Consequences

Filed under
Microsoft

Remember when AOL thought it was doing the world's researchers a big favor and made a boatload of online user behavior data openly available? Remember the unintended consequences? Well, thanks to Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer's recent transparency on his beliefs about Linux and Windows, we have a similar unintended educational consequence in the works.

The Road to KDE 4: New KOffice Technologies

Filed under
KDE

In this weeks' edition of the Road to KDE 4, we'll take a look at the up and coming KWord 2.0 as part of the KOffice project. KWord 1.6.1 is already a powerful KDE-integrated word processor, but with KDE 4 technologies, KWord 2.0 promises to be among the most powerful free word processors available.

Fedora Core 6 reaches the 1 million mark in just 74 days

Filed under
Linux

A mere 74 days after its release, Fedora Core 6 (Zod) has been downloaded over 1 million times, according to the project's leader. That works out to approximately nine downloads per minute for more than 10 weeks straight.

Also: Installing Linux-VServer

Marketing Linux - the penultimate barrier

Filed under
Linux

There seems to be a big split in the opinions of those within the Linux community, some think that Linux will never make a big impact in the desktop world and others believe it can and will. Oddly enough I think that both points of view are right. Let me explain what I'm thinking.

Also: Why Linux should be taken over Vista

Learn Perl in 10 easy lessons - Lesson 6

Filed under
HowTos

In the previous lessons we've used a lot of functions that were built-in the language. For instance, we used "split", "print", "chomp" ...etc. What we haven't done yet, is to define our own functions. In Perl we call them subroutines.

Bad-Guy Tools for Good Guys

Filed under
Software

Script kiddies, Far-Eastern organized crime gangs, disgruntled employees: you name them and the chances are that at some point in the future your network will come under attack from them. In fact it probably already has.

N800 first impressions

Filed under
Reviews

If you're not familiar with it, this is Nokia's second handheld computer running their Linux-based Internet Tablet OS (the first being the Nokia 770, released in 2005). Here are some first impressions of this new device from a 770 user.

A look at the newest Python Metaprogramming

Filed under
Linux

Python made metaprogramming possible, but each Python version has added slightly different -- and not quite compatible -- wrinkles to the way you accomplish metaprogramming tricks. Python has recently grown “decorator,” which are the newest -- and by far the most user-friendly way, so far -- to perform most metaprogramming.

Gates Foundation's 'dirty secret'

Filed under
Misc

In a contradiction between its grants and its endowment holdings, a Times investigation has found, the foundation reaps vast financial gains every year from investments that contravene its good works.

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More in Tux Machines

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers

FOSS and Linux Events

  • On speaking at community conferences
    Many people reading this have already suffered me talking to them about Prometheus. In personal conversation, or in the talks I gave at DebConf15 in Heidelberg, the Debian SunCamp in Lloret de Mar, BRMlab in Prague, and even at a talk on a different topic at the RABS in Cluj-Napoca.
  • TPM Microconference Accepted into LPC 2016
    Although trusted platform modules (TPMs) have been the subject of some controversy over the years, it is quite likely that they have important roles to play in preventing firmware-based attacks, protecting user keys, and so on. However, some work is required to enable TPMs to successfully play these roles, including getting TPM support into bootloaders, securely distributing known-good hashes, and providing robust and repeatable handling of upgrades. In short, given the ever-more-hostile environments that our systems must operate in, it seems quite likely that much help will be needed, including from TPMs. For more details, see the TPM Microconference wiki page.
  • More translations added to the SFD countdown
    Software Freedom Day is celebrated all around the world and as usual our community helps us to provide marketing materials in their specific languages. While the wiki is rather simple to translate, the Countdown remains a bit more complicated and time consuming to localize. One needs to edit the SVG file and generate roughly a 100 pictures, then upload them to the wiki. Still this doesn’t scare the SFD teams around the world and we are happy to announce three more languages are ready to be used: French, Chinese and German!

Second FreeBSD 11.0 Release Candidate Restores Support for 'nat global' in IPFW

Glen Barber from the FreeBSD project announced the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) development build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system. Read more