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Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 9:03pm
Story FreeBSD 10.1 Beta 3 Features Even More UEFI Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 8:42pm
Story GNOME 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 8:20pm
Story Join me in supporting The Ada Initiative Rianne Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 8:01pm
Story Cantor: new features in KDE 4.14 Rianne Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 7:50pm
Story Udine city struggles to remove IT vendor lock-in Roy Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 7:08pm
Story The Path to Full-time Open Source Roy Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 7:07pm
Story Mir 0.8 Works On Less ABI Breakage, Touchspots, Responsiveness Roy Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 4:06pm
Story Open source history, present day, and licensing Roy Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 3:20pm
Story Mozilla Wants to Save the Open Web, but is it Too Late? Roy Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 12:30pm

Tabs in file managers

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: These days, everyone agrees that tabs belong in webbrowsers. As I’m writing this article, I have nine tabs open, one to write this and eight with the articles I’ll link in it. I think tabs are one of the best things the new generation of web browsers have. But do they belong in file managers?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Gentoo x64 - Performance Shock

  • On Governance
  • OSCON 2008 in photos
  • CrunchBang Linux 8.04.02 Release Notes
  • How many nautilus windows can 882.7mb of RAM handle?
  • Marc Fleury starts an open-source home automation project
  • OLS: Kernel documentation, and submitting kernel patches
  • Google Hands Oregon State $300,000 for Open Source
  • OpenID gets the third degree at OSCON
  • Open Source Skype Scuppered
  • Every OS Sucks
  • More Linux and Unix Laughs For The Weekend
  • Howto Use Bootchart to Time and Track your Boot Sequence
  • How to reset/recover the ROOT password in openSUSE
  • Linux Outlaws 48 - LugRadio Live
  • Software achieves Linux compliance
  • Asustek to extend battery life and storage capacity for Eee PCs in 2H08
  • Open Source - What is the Total Cost of Ownership?
  • Open-source electronic voting
  • 3 open-source challenges: cloud computing, open Web, mobile

Customize Compiz Fusion effects In Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

geekishblog.com: Ubuntu 8.04(Hardy Heron) comes with a full featured version of Compiz Fusion, but the main problem is that there is no way to configure these effects. To configure the different options we will use a tool called Compiz Config.

Testdriving Zimbra Desktop Mail for Linux

Filed under
Software

anojrs.blogspot: Ever since Yahoo acquired Zimbra, a lot of us were waiting for the next big thing in desktop emailing. Recently, Yahoo launched Zimbra desktop, an open source email client which aims to increase your productivity by integrating an email client, calendar, task list, contact manager and a briefcase, all in one slick and easy package. It's time to see how well it fares.

Christmas Comes In July For An Open ATI

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: Many Linux users will be celebrating the Christmas holiday in five months, but it seems there's a holiday worth celebrating today for open-source ATI Linux users.

Are Gnome and Ubuntu ruining the Linux Desktop?

Filed under
Ubuntu

scienceblogs.com: Some current news in the Linuxosphere, and some things going on on my very own desktop, have me wondering about the nature of the Linux Desktop. Are Gnome and Ubuntu ruining the Linux Desktop? And if they are, what do we do about it?

Red Hat founder concerned over Bill C-61

Filed under
Linux

blogs.itworldcanada: Bob Young, CEO of online publisher Lulu Inc., has expressed concern in the past over the effects of copyright legislation on open source development.

OSCON: openSUSE's Eleventh Hour

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

informationweek.com/blog: Aside from having one of the niftier names in the industry, Joe "Zonker" Brockmeier has a pretty nifty job, too: He's the openSUSE Community Manager at Novell, where he oversees the folks that help make what will ultimately turn into the next version of SUSE Linux Enterprise. I grabbed a few minutes of his time to follow up on things I'd talked to him about back at the Red Hat Summit.

Tux3 Versioning Filesystem

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "Since everybody seems to be having fun building new filesystems these days, I thought I should join the party, began Daniel Phillips, announcing the Tux3 versioning filesystem.

Drupal, KDE, and You

Filed under
KDE
Drupal

codeincarnate.com: Work continues on the Dot update. We're in the middle boring stages now, plenty going on, but there isn't really anything interesting to talk about on that front. There will be soon, and I appreciate everyone's patience. But I wanted to take some time to talk about something relatively important. Why did I choose Drupal for the Dot?

Also: State of Drupal 2008 survey

NimbleX 2008 Mini-Review

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: A while back, as you may remember, I did a quick look at NimbleX, as well as some of the features of the then upcoming NimbleX 2008. Just a few days ago, NimbleX 2008 final was released, so I decided to check it out.

Give KDE and Gnome a unified look

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: Out of the box, both KDE3 and Gnome look like crap. There, I said it. But all that doesn’t really matter. Themes and icon themes are easily changed.

Google Gadgets for Linux -- almost there

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Since version 2 came out in 2005, Google Desktop for Windows has included a sidebar that users can fill with screen gadgets, but the Linux version (version 1, from June 2007) provided only indexing and search functions, with no eye candy whatsoever. This has finally changed. Google recently released Google Gadgets for Linux (GGL), which closes the gap between the operating systems.

Compromising to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

saigonnezumi.com: Well, reality finally took hold on me this week. Yeah, I am a ardent fan of Arch, Gentoo, and FreeBSD. I really like Linux Mint. Unfortunately for me, the Linux distribution of choice in Vietnam is Ubuntu.

'The Shining' gets remade with WowWee bots

Filed under
Movies
Humor

engadget.com: All work and no play makes Robosapien a dull bot. All work and n0 play makes R0b0sapien a dull bot. All w0rk and no play makes R0101ap1en a dull b0t. A11 w0rk a1d n0 play m01es R0101ap1en a dull b0t. A11 101k 11d n0 p10y m01es R010101e0 a d011 b0t.

Full Circle Magazine Issue 15 out

Filed under
Ubuntu

it’s that time of month again! This month: command and conquer - The Ins and Outs of Directories, how-to: Create a Separate Home Partition, Create Your Own Server (Part 7), Using GIMP (Part 4), and GRUB 101, and my story - Ubuntu Saves the Day and From Mickey’s ABCs to Kubuntu.

Microsoft and Its Open-Source Plans

Filed under
Microsoft

eweek.com: Microsoft is now a major sponsor of the Apache Software Foundation and is putting its protocols and formats into a royalty-free licens, all part of a larger open-source push.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HOW-TO enable read/write in FAT partition after error

  • Howto: Use xplanet for a desktop weather map
  • How To Harden Your Linux Server (Debian / Ubuntu)
  • Gentoo Prefix: PORTAGE_TMPDIR on NFS solution
  • Install “ubuntu netboot remix” menu in hardy heron
  • Mixing A Podcast In Ardour - Part 5
  • Performance Tuning Best Practices for MySQL
  • debian: building custom exim packages
  • Lenovo ThinkPad X61t Touch support
  • Dpkg Cheat Sheet
  • The Sort Command
  • Upgrade to the Latest Compiz Fusion Release
  • -A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p 50 -j ACCEPT
  • Bash scripting Tutorial
  • Getting that wiki feeling on the desktop, part 3

Top Ten mailing list posts in the history of free/open source software

Filed under
OSS

commandline.org.uk: A few months ago, we looked at Linus Torvalds in his own words, which was surprisingly popular. So following the same approach, what are the top-ten best mailing list posts in the history of free/open source software?

Linux Secret Lovers

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Some Windows users secretly love Linux. They want to use Linux but are too chicken to install it on their hard drive. So, they use a program like Windows Blinds to radically alter the graphical user interface of their Windows desktop and make it look like that of Linux. To prove it, here are some screenshots of Linux secret lovers' desktop.

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.