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Thursday, 27 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2013 - 11:45pm
Story Make the solid state drive (SSD) plunge with Linux Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2013 - 10:50pm
Story Linux to lead in automotive infotainment OS market Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2013 - 10:34pm
Story When three Linux journos go crowdfunding Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2013 - 10:13pm
Story TWO MILLION! [Raspberry Pis] Rianne Schestowitz 17/11/2013 - 8:16pm
Story Boeing uses open source to build cloud-based digital aviation platform Roy Schestowitz 17/11/2013 - 5:29pm
Story Sony's new PlayStation 4 and open source FreeBSD: The TRUTH Roy Schestowitz 17/11/2013 - 5:26pm
Story Agencies Widen Open-Source Use Roy Schestowitz 17/11/2013 - 5:22pm
Story Red Hat CFO: OpenStack is where Linux was 10 years ago Roy Schestowitz 17/11/2013 - 5:16pm
Story Geekbuzz - 5 Top Linux Games Roy Schestowitz 17/11/2013 - 5:14pm

Some Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux caught sleeping on the job

  • Basic Linux Tips & Tricks, part 2
  • Linux: Monitor hard disks temperature with hddtemp
  • Installing an Ubuntu monitoring system with Cacti, Zenoss and Smokeping
  • How to Run Web Applications Seamlessly on Ubuntu
  • How to Install Compiz in Debian
  • Show the List of Installed Packages on Ubuntu or Debian

Novell Delivers Open Enterprise Server 2

Filed under
SUSE

opensource.sys-con.com: Novell Open Enterprise Server 2 is now available to customers worldwide. Open Enterprise Server 2 features full 64-bit support of software services previously found only on NetWare, along with storage management enhancements and NetWare virtualization.

Also: Novell Sparkles in OpenSUSE Update

Supporting More Partitions!

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "15 partitions (at least for sd_mod devices) are too few," Jan Engelhardt suggested along with a patch to try and make the mounting of an unlimited number of partitions possible. H. Peter Anvin proposed as an alternative, "now when we have 20-bit minors, can't we simply recycle some of the higher bits for additional partitions, across the board?

Also: Load Balancing Cpusets

Some openSUSE 10.3 Misconceptions

Filed under
SUSE

kdedevelopers.org: There are some misconceptions floating around about openSUSE 10.3. Unfortunately uninformed people are still allowed to blog Eye-wink so let me pick up some I read:

Also: People of openSUSE: Christian Boltz

Educating the masses and squabbling at the distrotech

The user doesn’t care what the operating system is, they are not installing it to use an operating system, they are installing it for the things they can install and run on it… can they use their word, excel, PowerPoint docs… how? Can they play their CDs? How? Can they watch a DVD from their collection? How? If all those names, IBM, Novell etc, were shown in an ad, people would have a lot more confidence to try and see. That’s all Linux needs them to do, try one. Any one. They are all united under the march of the penguin.

Customize your Emacs world

Filed under
News

This tutorial walks you through some of the useful ways you can customize and configure the Emacs environment. Learn how to change everything about the Emacs environment to your liking, from the behavior of minor modes to the default key bindings.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 223

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Puppy Linux 3.00

  • News: openSUSE 10.3 released, Mandriva 2008 seeded, Ubuntu 7.10 available for pre-order, Judd Vinet resigns as Arch Linux project leader
  • Released last week: openSUSE 10.3, Zenwalk Linux 4.8
  • Upcoming releases: Mandriva Linux 2008, Frugalware Linux 0.7
  • New distributions: Alegna Linux, Elbuntu, KinuX Linux, Linius, Mythbuntu
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Dell Preps for Next Linux Desktop Release

Filed under
Ubuntu

TechIQ: A major desktop Linux upgrade is set to be released on October 18. Michael Dell is expected to personally use it. And the PC giant will pre-load it on selected desktops and notebooks. Buzz about this next Linux release — dubbed Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon — is growing across the web. But what exactly does Gutsy Gibbon (aka Ubuntu 7.10) offer to desktop customers and solutions providers? Here’s a look.

Also: Ubuntu 7.10 should make Dell happy

“Is a cursory look at the CentOS LIVE CD worth every penny?”

Filed under
Misc

Enterprise Linux Log: The review in question in this case is one for CentOS 5. Or, I should say, it is a review for the CentOS 5 LiveCD that proclaims to be a review for the enterprise release of CentOS. It’s an important distinction to make and, if you’re trying to catch a break as a Linux review site, you should probably know the difference before your fingers hit the keys to type out a headline.

"Novell is not forking OpenOffice"

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: From recent media reports, casual readers could easily believe that OpenOffice.org, the popular free office suite, is fragmenting. Slashdot reported last week that Novell is backing an official fork, while Ars Technica suggested that if what was happening fell short of a fork, then it was still "serious fragmentation" and "not a good thing for the OpenOffice.org community." However, a closer look at the situation shows that what is happening is less of a dramatic split than the airing of long-time grievances and the media's discovery of a long-established institution.

Thunderbird Process of Change Part 1

Filed under
Moz/FF

mitchell's blog: In the coming months there will be a lot of discussion about how mail and Thunderbird will evolve. There will also be more detailed discussions about the new organizational home as we move from plans to concreteness. This seems a good time to describe how we got to where we are today.

Open Source Gaming Review: Wormux 0.8

Filed under
Gaming

raiden's realm: For anyone who ever loved and played the famous Worms PC game series, then Wormux is the game for you. Even if you weren't much of a fan (like myself) of the original Works series, you'll find Wormux none the less captivating and enjoyable, and even addictive in some respects.

Managing and configuring downloads with KGet

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftware mag: Downloading—no matter what operating system you are using—is ubiquitous. If you’ve been on the internet you will have downloaded something at some point. This article will take a detailed look at KGet, a very versatile GUI download manager for the KDE desktop which is easy to use and has plenty of easily configurable options.

Licensing for laymen - GPL explained

Filed under
OSS

tectonic: The GPL was first developed by Free Software Foundation founder, Richard Stallman in 1989. The licence challenged standard proprietary licences, supplanting the familiar copyright with copyleft.

Hands on: Command post

Filed under
HowTos

personal computer world: Although it is often seen as old-fashioned, the shell can make certain tasks easier and faster to perform than loading up a GUI application to do the same, and it is definitely worth getting to know.

Mac and Linux fail to capitalise on Vista mistakes

Filed under
OS

the inquirer: IT LOOKS like the Mac OS-X and Linux operating system have failed to do any damage to Microsoft Windows, despite the Vista fiasco.

Firefox extensions for tab addicts

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: For Firefox users who are constantly referring to multiple pages, tabbed browsing is not a feature, but a way of life. There are enough of us that the Firefox addon page lists more than 110 extensions related to tabs. If you regularly have more than half a dozen tabs open, you might also want to consider Multiple Tab Handler.

Latest OpenSUSE a mixed bag for educators

Filed under
SUSE

zdnet: It took a while, but I finally downloaded the full DVD image for Novell’s OpenSUSE 10.3. A single-CD install is also available, but I wanted to have the full library of additional software available to me, as well as all of the non-open source software not included on the CD, so I braved hours of file sharing, all in the name of ZDNet blogs.

The chicken or the egg: Ubuntu on ftp.gnome.org

Filed under
Ubuntu

beranger: A few minutes ago, I went to ftp://ftp.gnome.org/. The first thing I noticed was that releases is a symlink to mirror/ubuntu-releases/. Is Ubuntu that important to consume GNOME's bandwidth?

Gentoo Tutorial part 2: Adding goodies to the system.

Filed under
Gentoo
HowTos

futurepages.net: This is the second part of the Gentoo Tutorials. In the first section “Minimal Gentoo Installation” we have built a fresh Gentoo system using the minimal install disk and downloading the stages/ports and building the kernel. This left us with a bare Gentoo OS. In this second Gentoo Tutorial we are going to customize and add different software to the system.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Snap creation tool 'snapcraft' has a new release with the groundwork for collaboration
  • Mobile Ubuntu Gamble to Fizzle Out in June
  • The Pop GTK Theme Brings Ubuntu with GNOME to Life
    If you’re looking to give your newly minted GNOME desktop a bit of a makeover look no further than the Pop GTK theme. Created by the popular Ubuntu computer seller System76, the Pop GTK theme puts a modern spin on the Ubuntu brown and orange colour scheme (which also happen to be the colours used in the System76 logo).
  • 2017 will be the year of the Linux desktop... for GNOME on Ubuntu
    A few weeks ago, Mark Shuttleworth, now CEO of Canonical, announced that the Unity desktop shell would be abandoned in favour of GNOME. While we were told that GNOME would be used by Ubuntu 18.04, we weren't sure whether it'd be included in Ubuntu 17.10, the next release. Following a meeting on IRC, we now know that GNOME will ship by default in the next release.
  • Ubuntu GNOME merged into mainline Ubuntu
    Ubuntu has been using the Unity environment developed by Caonical Ltd. since the netbook edition of Ubuntu 10.10, initially released on June 9, 2010. However, it has been decided that the Unity environment would no longer be the standard environment used for the popular GNU/Linux distro. In a blog post by Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu and Canonical, he says, "We are wrapping up an excellent quarter and an excellent year for the company, with performance in many teams and products that we can be proud of. As we head into the new fiscal year, it’s appropriate to reassess each of our initiatives. I’m writing to let you know that we will end our investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell. We will shift our default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS."

today's howtos

Security Leftovers

Mesa 17.0.5