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Tuesday, 28 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LibreOffice 3.3.1 Released, New Icons, Bug Fixes srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 5:20pm
Story GNOME 3 2.91.90 released srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 5:18pm
Story Linux Mint 10 KDE released srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 5:16pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:48am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:39am
Story Pinguy OS 10.04.2 Screenshots srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:38am
Story One on One with Dries Buytaert of Acquia srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:36am
Story Still Think Linux Is Just for Start-Ups? srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:28am
Story Year of Linux (Unix) srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:26am
Story How Movable Type Lost With Open Source srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 3:06am

The SCO-Microsoft connection grows darker

Filed under
Microsoft

The cat is out of the bag. According to BayStar Capital's managing partner Larry Goldfarb, Microsoft allegedly assured BayStar that it would somehow "guarantee" BayStar's $50 million investment in SCO.

Firefox 2.0 RC2 Is a Step … Backward?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox 2.0 moved closer to its official launch with the recent availability of Release Candidate 2 of the popular open-source Web browser. And while Firefox RC2 differs little from RC1 and the previous betas that eWEEK Labs has reviewed, a couple of small—and, in our opinion, negative—changes jumped out during initial tests of this release.

The slow but steady march of open-source

Filed under
OSS

It may not be taking the world by storm, but open-source still has a growing and determined group of adherents. Technology executives at two Canadian users of the technology, Pioneer Petroleum and Vancouver Community College, talk about why they chose it, what it was like to implement and some of the advantages of moving to an open platform.

Quicktip - How to mount/unmout ISO images without burning them

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever come across an ISO you want to check out but you don’t want to burn the thing to a CD or DVD? Perhaps you’re remastering your linux distro, or you’re creating a bootable, slipstreamed WinXP install or something and you want to test it without waisting 10 DVDs in the process. Well, here’s how to do it.

How you can digitally sign OpenOffice.org documents

Filed under
HowTos

The ability to digitally sign OpenOffice.org documents is a boon for users who want to make their document exchange and collaboration secure. Using digital signatures in OpenOffice.org is not that difficult, but configuring it involves several steps that are far from obvious.

Debian Etch Kernels

Filed under
Linux

This article will show what changes (related to the debian kernel images) can Debian Sarge users expect to see when Etch will reach stable. Users of Debian testing/sid are already familiar with these changes as they are live in Etch for a while.

Does the Wii run Linux?

Filed under
Gaming

Blogger Kiyoshi Saruwatari claims that Nintendo's upcoming Wii console runs on the open source Linux operating system.

Why having core dumps in Mandriva 2007?

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

Firefox was using 100% of the CPU in my Mandriva 2007, and suddenly it went out of sight. Well, it was gone, but the bad thing is that 145 MB file on my desktop. To disable the generation of the core dumps, edit the file /etc/security/limits.conf.

Book Review: C++ for beginners

Filed under
Reviews

Illustrated, colourful and well explained, C++ Programming in Easy Steps is a good grounding in the language if you've never programmed before and for the price is relatively good value. But do factor in the cost of your next C++ book, because this one will only get you so far before you're ready to tackle more challenging programming tasks.

Developers are from Mars, Programmers are from Venus

Filed under
Misc

Many of us use the terms "programmer" and "developer" interchangeably. When someone asks me what I do for a living I tend to describe my vocation as "computer programmer" rather than "software developer", because the former seems to be understood more readily by those unfamiliar with IT. Even when writing pieces for this site, I tend to swap back and forth between the two terms, to try and avoid sounding repetitive. But in truth, there is a world of difference between a computer programmer and a software developer.

iXsystems Announces Acquisition of PC-BSD Operating System

Filed under
BSD

iXsystems, an enterprise-class hardware solution provider, announced today its acquisition of PC-BSD, a rock solid UNIX operating system based on FreeBSD. PC-BSD is a fully functional desktop operating system running FreeBSD version 6, with a KDE desktop interface and graphical system installer. Its PBI system, developed exclusively for PC-BSD, lets users download and install their applications in a self-extracting and installing format.

Install songbird in Debian Machine With Screenshots and enjoy Your Music

This is first time songbird installation articlee in debin.Songbird plays the Media Web. Play MP3s without leaving the page. Songbird views Web pages as dynamic playlists to play, save, download or subscribe to.

Songbird plays your music too with all the features you’d expect in a desktop media player. Like Firefox, Songbird’s features may be improved with user installed and contributed cross-platform extensions.

Read Full article here

AI versus AI: N.E.R.O. on Linux

Filed under
Gaming

If you've ever been frustrated with the artificial intelligence (AI) in video games, then you are a prime candidate for Neuro-Evolving Robotic Operatives (N.E.R.O.), a cross-platform combat game where the key to winning is training your own intelligent non-player characters. On the field of play, the only rule is "let the best AI win." I tested my skills with the Linux client, and found N.E.R.O. to be a very different sort of game.

French urged to adopt OpenDocument format

Filed under
OSS

A REPORT commissioned by the French prime minister has called for the country's bureaucrats to adopt the OpenDocument Format.

Ubuntu Seeks Idents on Demo Scene

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth explained at Sundown that Ubuntu is looking into ways to include demoscene animation during the wait for Ubuntu to boot. The project returns to the origins of the demo scene, an identity projected while loading software.

Making Sense of the OLPC Proprietary Software Row

Filed under
OLPC
Interviews

Theo de Raadt, the leader of the OpenBSD project and a vociferous crusader for hardware (especially networking) documentation, recently went public with his concerns about the One Laptop Per Child project's choice to use a wireless networking chip from Marvell, a company with an unusually poor record of supporting free software operating systems, in the 2B1 laptop computer that it is developing.

Open Source madness!

Filed under
OSS

I love free software. I use open-source programs and operating systems every day. But once in a while, I want to take some free software developers and shake them until their teeth rattle.

Updates on Flash Player 9 for Linux

Filed under
Software

There has been some interesting stuff coming out about Flash Player 9 for Linux, and I wanted to put it all in one place for those following the development.

More Here.

Aussie Feds assess open source

Filed under
OSS

FEDERAL government use of open-source software will be examined to assess how many agencies have adopted Linux and other systems.

Google to acquire YouTube for $1.65 billion in stock

Filed under
Google

Google Inc. said Monday it’s buying No. 1 Internet video sharing Web site YouTube Inc. for $1.65 billion in stock. The deal is regarded as a largely defensive one that leapfrogs Google into a leading role in a burgeoning Internet marketplace.

Full Story.

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More in Tux Machines

Five reasons to switch from Windows to Linux

Linux has been in the ascendancy ever since the open source operating system was released, and has been improved and refined over time so that a typical distribution is now a polished and complete package comprising virtually everything the user needs, whether for a server or personal system. Much of the web runs on Linux, and a great many smartphones, and numerous other systems, from the Raspberry Pi to the most powerful supercomputers. So is it time to switch from Windows to Linux? Here are five reasons why. Read more

today's leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Chrome vulnerability lets attackers steal movies from streaming services
    A significant security vulnerability in Google technology that is supposed to protect videos streamed via Google Chrome has been discovered by researchers from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC) in collaboration with a security researcher from Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin, Germany.
  • Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website
    Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that's made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. The researchers with Security firm Sucuri came across the malicious network while defending a small brick-and-mortar jewelry shop against a distributed denial-of-service attack. The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second.
  • Study finds Password Misuse in Hospitals a Steaming Hot Mess
    Hospitals are pretty hygienic places – except when it comes to passwords, it seems. That’s the conclusion of a recent study by researchers at Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and USC, which found that efforts to circumvent password protections are “endemic” in healthcare environments and mostly go unnoticed by hospital IT staff. The report describes what can only be described as wholesale abandonment of security best practices at hospitals and other clinical environments – with the bad behavior being driven by necessity rather than malice.
  • Why are hackers increasingly targeting the healthcare industry?
    Cyber-attacks in the healthcare environment are on the rise, with recent research suggesting that critical healthcare systems could be vulnerable to attack. In general, the healthcare industry is proving lucrative for cybercriminals because medical data can be used in multiple ways, for example fraud or identify theft. This personal data often contains information regarding a patient’s medical history, which could be used in targeted spear-phishing attacks.
  • Making the internet more secure
  • Beyond Monocultures
  • Dodging Raindrops Escaping the Public Cloud