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Saturday, 24 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

How to make Kontact work with Google Apps

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: Recently, Gmail added IMAP support, giving the powerhouse email host the ability to interact better with third-party clients. And Google, being the friendly neighborhood do-gooder that it is, provided instructions on how to use IMAP with a variety of third-party clients. However, it forgot one popular client: KMail. Here's how you can integrate them.

Firefox 3 beta 2 planned for December 21, test day on Friday

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: At the last Firefox 3 status meeting, Mozilla developers planned the release schedule for the second Firefox 3 beta.

Reiser's Mom Defending Son on Her Second Day of Testimony

Filed under
Reiser

wired: Hans Reiser mother took the witness stand at her son's murder trial here for the second day Tuesday and did what moms usually do: Protect their offspring.

KWin composite video available

Filed under
KDE

liquidat: Francis Giannaros published a screencast featuring KWin’s compositioning features. The very well made video is provided as a Flash video (Google) as well as an high quality Ogg video. It shows KDE 4 from a point of view which got just to few attention the last weeks.

At least 125m Firefox users estimated

Filed under
Moz/FF

tectonic: In a recent blogg post John Lilly, chief operating officer at Mozilla, said that Mozilla estimated worldwide that at least 125 million unique users ran Firefox each month.

Gartner underhypes open source

Matt Asay: I'm not sure who Gartner talks to when it puts together its famous "Hype Cycle" reports, but I'm finding it hard to believe that it talks with enterprises. I was recently reading through its "Hype Cycle for Open-Source Software, 2007" report, and was astounded to find out that I've been tricked by paying customers into believing that they were, well, paying.

One Laptop Per Child Doesn't Change the World

Filed under
OLPC

John C. Dvorak: Hands Across America, Live AID, the Concert for Bangladesh, and so on. These folks think that any sort of participation in these events, or even their good thoughts about world poverty and starvation, actually help. Now they can sleep at night. It doesn't matter that nothing has really changed. This is how I view the cute, little One Laptop Per Child computer.

Five days of Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

bluesuncorp.co.uk: Last wednesday I ordered a new laptop. I’ll definitely be installing Vista on it, if only for gaming and DirectX 10, but I also plan to use it as an excuse to get to grips with Linux. This is my account of it, as a completely new user.

Flash Player 9 Update 3 now available

Filed under
Software

mozillalinks.org: Following the series of Adobe Flash Player 9 Linux betas over the past year, the Adobe folks have unleashed the Flash Player 9 Update 3 Final build. This update is not only available for Windows and Mac OS X, but a new Linux build was released on the same day.

Wow! Red Hat can sling some mud!

Filed under
Linux

opsamericas.com: I woke up early this morning to catch an early flight out… and thought I’d check my email. What did I find, but this headline: “Red Hat exec says Novell sells beta code” which is a ZDnet UK blog entry.

And what exactly will sudo rm -rf do?

Filed under
Misc

kmandla.wordpress: The furor around the sudo rm -rf clowns has subsided (but will no doubt resurface in the future), but just for the record, what will that command do?

Linux Kernel Developer Ted Ts'o Joins Linux Foundation as Chief Platform Strategist

Filed under
Linux

marketwire: The Linux Foundation (LF), the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, today announced that Linux kernel filesystem maintainer Ted Ts'o is joining the organization as a Fellow and chief platform strategist.

The Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment: A return to basics

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment (LXDE) resembles a classic Unix project -- it's partly constructed out of pre-existing programs, its emphasis is on speed, and its configuration requires taking time in a text editor.

some howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • CLI Magic: Quick and easy backup with lftp

  • Konqueror Tip: Saving the Window Size
  • Taking Bash Completion to the Next Level
  • Check Your Gmail Account with cGmail
  • Getting Sound to work on your Ubuntu 7.10 installation on Lenovo Y410 Series laptop

Nokia N810 review

Filed under
Hardware

arstechnica.com: When I first began to test the N810 last week, my first impression of the product was somewhat mixed. I was impressed with the device overall, but I felt that the new features don't quite justify the higher price tag.

The Importance of the 'Completely Libre' Distributions

Filed under
Linux

blue-gnu.biz: The appearance in the past year of so-called "completely libre" distributions such as gNewSense and Gobuntu. Should we be looking for the "rise of the completely libre distros", or is there something more subtle that we should notice?

Red Hat Finally Nears Real-Time Linux Launch

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: For the last several years, Red Hat has been pushing forward the development of real-time enhancements for Linux. Yet the company has made no formal product announcement of how it would attempt to productize its real-time Linux innovations. That changed today.

Also: Red Hat Ranked #1 Most Valuable Software Vendor

What I don't like about Linux

Filed under
Linux

ittoolbox blogs: I think that Linux is a great operating system. In general it does everything that I want it to. As with any operating system there are a few niggley things that occasionally frustrate.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Eee PC - eerily popular

  • Want To Try KDE 4 Now? Go Live
  • NVIDIA XRender Performance Improved
  • Peru signs up for 260,000 OLPC laptops
  • A 2008 Press Release Prediction: Diamondville XO-2 Laptop
  • "Terminator" franchise plans videogame assault
  • Bruce Perens Leaves Sourcelabs
  • Are all Linux distributions created equally?
  • Has it been a week with Ubuntu already?
  • Linux dark matter obscures real Firefox user numbers
  • Firefox 3’s location bar power for Firefox 2
  • KDE Project Day at FOSS.IN/2007
  • Tips for Taming SE Linux
  • Solar + Tiny PC + Linux = Sweeeet
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today's leftovers

  • Effective Microservices Architecture with Event-Driven Design
    There’s no doubt, in the IT world, microservices are sexy. But just because you find something cool and attractive doesn’t mean it’s good for you. And it doesn’t mean you know how to use it properly.
  • Cloud Foundry Makes its Mark on the Enterprise
    "Proprietary will have to either get on board or be left in the dust."
  • Tumbleweed Review of the week 2017/25
    With the pace of Tumbleweed having resumed to ‘almost daily snapshots’ I will to the review again weekly instead of bi-weekly. It’s just easier to remember what big updates came in like this. This week I will cover the 6 snapshots 0616,0617,0618,0619,0620 and 0622 (again, 0622 just passed openQA and you will get it shortly on the mirror). There was also a 0621 tested, but discarded by openQA.
  • S10E16 – Enthusiastic Woozy Route
    It’s Season Ten Episode Sixteen of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson, Martin Wimpress and Joey Sneddon are connected and speaking to your brain.
  • My Meetup Slides: Deploy and Manage Kubernetes Clusters on Ubuntu in the Oracle Cloud
  •  
  • MinnowBoard 3 will offer Apollo Lake, triple M.2s, and Raspberry Pi expansion
    Minnowboard.org is prepping an open spec “MinnowBoard 3” SBC with a quad-core Apollo Lake, 4GB LPDDR4, 8GB eMMC, 3x M.2 sockets, and an RPi connector. The Intel-backed Minnowboard.org project has posted preliminary specs for an open-spec MinnowBoard 3 model to follow the recently shipped MinnowBoard Turbo Quad. Due to ship in the fall, the community-backed MinnowBoard 3 stands out with a 14nm Apollo Lake Atom, three M.2 sockets, and an “RPI” adapter. The only RPI we know of is Raspberry Pi, or more specifically, its much copied 40-pin expansion connector.
  • Open source social robot kit runs on Raspberry Pi and Arduino
    Thecorpora’s Scratch-ready “Q.bo One” robot is based on the RPi 3 and Arduino, and offers stereo cams, mics, a speaker, and visual and language recognition. In 2010, robotics developer Francisco Paz and his Barcelona-based Thecorpora startup introduced the first Qbo “Cue-be-oh” robot as an open source proof-of-concept and research project for exploring AI capabilities in multi-sensory, interactive robots. Now, after a preview in February at Mobile World Congress, Thecorpora has gone to Indiegogo to launch the first mass produced version of the social robot in partnership with Arrow.

Desktop: Popcorn Linux, Purism, Distro Hopping, System76, and 2017 Linux Laptop Survey

  • Popcorn Linux OS gives processors a common language
    Thanks to a new operating system called Popcorn Linux, the Navy may be able to speed systems development and cut maintenance. Developed by engineering researchers at Virginia Tech with support from the Office of Naval Research,  Popcorn Linux can compile different programming languages into a common format. The operating system takes generic coding language and translates it into multiple specialized program languages. Then it determines what pieces of the code are needed to perform particular tasks and transfers these instruction “kernels” (the “popcorn” part) to the appropriate function, ONR officials said. Chips for video systems might be programmed in one language and those for networking functions in another. These multicore processors improve computing speed, but they also force programmers to design or upgrade applications based on what programs run on which processors. That means complex systems like battlespace awareness and artificial intelligence that require specialized processors must be manually adjusted so components can interact with each other.
  • Purism's Security Focused Librem Laptops Go Mainstream as GA Begins, with $2.5M in Total Project Funding and 35 Percent Average Monthly Growth
  • Now it’s easier to buy Purism’s Linux laptops
    After running a crowdfunding campaign in 2015 to raise money for a laptop that runs free and open source software, Purism has been able to ship a limited number of 13 and 15 inch laptops, and the corporation is taking pre-orders for a 2-in-1 tablet.
  • Are You a Distro Hopper?
    Is distro hopping a dying sport or have I just gotten too old? When I first started to use Linux I was the quintessential cliche distro hopper. I swapped and switched flavor of Linux seemingly every other day, certain that at some point I’d find the right fit and stop, content with at whatever combination of distro base and desktop environment I’d hit upon.
  • System76 Continues Working On GNOME Improvements For Future Ubuntu
    System76 continues working on improvements to the GNOME stack as part of their transition in-step to using it over Unity 7, in line with Canonical's decision to switch Ubuntu over to GNOME and abandon their grand Unity 8 ambitions.
  • 2017 Linux Laptop Survey
    It has been a few years since last running any Linux hardware surveys on Phoronix, as overall the ecosystem has rather matured nicely while of course there are still notable improvements to be had in the areas of GPUs and laptops. (Additionally, OpenBenchmarking.org provides a plethora of analytic capabilities when not seeking to collect subjective data / opinions.) But now we are hosting the 2017 Linux Laptop Survey to hopefully further improvements in this area.

Software and GNOME: Pass, Popcorn Time, Nixnote2, Grive, Curlew, and GtkActionMuxer

  • Pass – A Simple command-line Password Manager for Linux
    Keep tracking the password is one of the big challenge to everyone now a days since we has multiple password like email, bank, social media, online portal, and ftp, etc.,. Password managers are become very famous due to the demand and usage. In Linux so many alternatives are available, GUI based and CLI based. Today we are going to discuss about CLI based password manager called pass.
  • Popcorn Time Watch Movies and TV Shows On Linux
    ​Watching your favorite TV shows and movies series is what you all guys do every day. Flash, Iron Fist or Moana and many more awesome movies and tv shows that we love to watch. The problems come when you are traveling. Many of your shows or movies are restricted to a particular region and cannot be accessed when you are traveling or want to just quickly watch that awesome flash punch from an episode of 1 month old.
  • Nixnote2 – A Clone of Evernote for Linux
    When I created a list of Alternative Evernote Clients for Linux, the formerly known NeverNote was on the list as NixNote since it hadn’t gained a “2” to its title yet. It has been 4 months since and I decided to give the app its own review for you guys. Without further ado, let’s get to it. NixNote2 (also called NixNote) is an unofficial client of Evernote for Linux. It possesses most of the features Evernote provides including the use of Notebooks, tags, themes, emails, and multiple accounts.
  • Grive – A Dockerized Google Drive Client for Linux
    Not too long ago I reviewed Grive2 as an alternative Google Drive client for Linux. Today, I’ll introduce you to Grive, a Docker implementation for the Google Drive client, Grive2. Docker (if you don’t already know what it is), is a tool designed to benefit both system admins and developers thanks to its use of containers. Docker’s containers provide a way for developers to create and distribute their apps using containers.
  • Curlew is a GTK Media Converter for the GNOME desktop
    There are plenty of free multimedia converters for Ubuntu available, with command-line champ FFmpeg arguably the most powerful of them all. But this power comes with a complexity. Using FFMpeg to convert media through the command line can be intimidating and arcane. Which is why FFMpeg frontends are popular.
  • Dazzle spotlight – Multi Paned and Action Muxing
    The way the GtkActionMuxer works is by following the widget hierarchy to resolve GActions. Since the HeaderBar is a sibling to the content area (and not a direct ancestor) you cannot activate those actions. It would be nice for the muxer to gain more complex support, but until then… Dazzle.