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Wednesday, 24 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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30 Days In GNOME vs. 3 Days In KDE

Filed under
Software

At the end of 2006, I prepared myself for a "survival experiment". After having read how a KDE fan was able to "survive" after a month of immersion in GNOME, I thought I could undergo a similar, though opposite process: how can a GNOME fanboy survive in KDE?

Free Culture Foundation enters the copyright debate

Filed under
OSS

Just before new year, on December 31st 2006 the Free Culture Foundation site has been launched. The site appears to be mimicking the Free Software Foundation in form and also presents four core freedoms on which the Free Culture Movement should be based, to use, create, share and learn.

Software ain't patentable, damn it!

Filed under
OSS

"Thus, this [Supreme] Court's precedent repeatedly sets out that software, which is nothing more than a set of instructions – an algorithm – to be performed by a computer in order to solve some mathematical problem, is subject matter that is not patentable..."

Linux File Services: Good Things Arrive in Fours

Filed under
Linux

Neither the ext4 filesystem nor Samba 4 are ready for prime-time yet, but they are chock-full of promise and potential, so let's take a look at what they are promising to deliver.

Survey: Linux reaching critical mass

Filed under
OSS

Nearly half of all enterprises will be running mission-critical business applications on Linux in five years' time. The company predicts a steep rise: only 18 percent of businesses will be using Linux in business-critical roles by the end of 2007.

Also: Quarter of firms on Linux by 2009, say analysts

Anger as EU ignores open-source video

Filed under
OSS

More than 7,000 angry Linux users have protested against the European Union after it excluded them from viewing streaming videos. Stefan Esterer created an online petition last Friday which calls on the EU to stop excluding open-source users.

Reiser Headlines:

Filed under
Reiser
  • Son's Testimony May Be Key In Reiser Murder Hearing

  • Missing woman's husband nervous, witness says
  • DA case looks at Reiser's actions

Mark Shuttleworth: The Extra Dimension

Filed under
Ubuntu

Apple calls it Quartz. Microsoft calls it something else but it’s most visible in Aero Glass - the transparent theme in Vista. In the free software world we have Xgl and AIGLX (Ubuntu is going down the AIGLX road).

Windows vs. Open Source in 2007

Filed under
OSS

The open souce arena is forming a rather formidable fan following. In the beginning this was a small community known onl to a niche audience but today we see a different pisture. Commercial software and the the open source software seem to be at the same footing.

Book Review: Core Python Programming - 2nd Edition

Filed under
Reviews

I found the book titled "Core Python Programming" authored by Wesley.J.Chun and published by Prentice Hall to be an ideal book to learn the wonderful Python language. This book is quite voluminous, with 23 chapters spanning 1050 pages.

Bzflags: Kill or be killed

Filed under
Gaming

The aim of this article is to introduce the reader to Bzflags. Bzflags is a free software multiplayer 3D tank game that is frantic, full of immediate action, with a kill or be killed emphasis. The game is best served in multiplayer mode where you can hunt in packs, fight to the last ounce while chatting. Instant violent fun, gratification for those of you that need to let off steam and clear your minds living for the moment.

The Real Firefox-Killer

Filed under
Software

Firefox fans will be facing 2007 with more tranquillity than they did 2006. A year ago, it was clear that Firefox's free ride was about to end: after an astonishing five years of inactivity, Microsoft was finally launching an updated version of Internet Explorer.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install d4x Download manager in Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Tute Part 1
  • Pull in HDTV with Linux and the HD-5500
  • Clone Your Ubuntu installation
  • HowTo: Ubuntu home LAN server
  • Searching your world with Beagle
  • Disable Text Wrapping in Vim

The year of the Linux desktop!

Filed under
Linux

That the idea has been floated again does not surprise me. This is a year when Microsoft will be seeking to push a new version of its Windows operating system down consumers' throats. It's also a year when several GNU/Linux distributions can claim to be sufficiently desktop-oriented for the average person to have no problem using any one of them.

Exit Interview: Why Open Source Guru Left Novell

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

Jeremy Allison is a hero in the open source community these days. After spending two years at Novell, he decided to leave the Waltham, Mass.-based software company for reasons of principle right after the Linux-vendor signed a deal with Microsoft. Before he starts a new job at search engine Google Tuesday, Mr. Allison answered some questions from Red Herring.

Kubuntu 6.10 Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Kubuntu is a distribution which takes Ubuntu's base packages and adds to it the KDE desktop and a set of KDE applications. Although the two distributions are similar in many ways, their desktop and default set of applications are extremely different.

Distributing Software Modules Using rsync

Filed under
Software

Distributing software packages to all of our servers is a tedious task. Currently, a release manager makes a connection to each server and transfers files using ftp. This involves entering passwords multiple times, waiting for transfers to complete, changing directories, and keeping files organized. We developed a shell script that makes the job easier.

Straddling the Open Source/Proprietary Fence

Filed under
OSS

Given the jaw-dropping occurrences in the open source world last year (Red Hat’s acquisition of JBoss, Oracle’s announcement of “Unbreakable Linux,” and Novell’s patent pact with Microsoft, to name a few), InfoWorld’s Neil McAllister says balancing open and proprietary, commercial and free, will be the critical task for enterprise IT managers this year and for a time to follow.

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More in Tux Machines

Schools that #GoOpen should #GoOpenSource

School administrators know that traditional proprietary textbooks are expensive. Teachers in budget-strapped schools often face shortages of textbooks. Worse, print content is usually out-of-date as soon as the ink dries on the page. There has to be something better than students hauling bulbous backpacks loaded with dead knowledge stamped on dead trees. In the fall of 2015, the U.S. Department of Education launched the #GoOpen campaign, an initiative encouraging public schools to adopt openly-licensed digital educational materials to transform teaching and learning, and perhaps lighten both backpacks and textbook bills. The Department recently published the #GoOpen District Launch Packet, a useful step-by-step implementation guide for schools planning a transition from traditional textbooks to Open Educational Resources (OER). We should applaud the Department of Education's efforts to promote affordable, equitable, and quality educational materials for all schools. Their initiative empowers educators to curate, shape, and share educational content at a local level. No longer is the written word of proprietary publishers like Pearson the fountain of all classroom knowledge. Districts that choose to #GoOpen opt to honor teacher expertise, empower them to build communities of shared practice, and encourage collaboration with colleagues across counties and states. Given unfettered permission to revise, remix, and redistribute curriculum material, teachers are trusted to become active agents in the creation of high-quality learning materials. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat CEO Tells LinuxCon Crowd What Makes Linux Stand Out
    Five years ago, on the 20th anniversary of Linux, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst delivered a keynote address at LinuxCon. Today, he returned to the LinuxCon stage here to help celebrate the 25th anniversary of Linux, bringing a message not all that different from the one he shared in 2011. The Linux world, however, is a different place in 2016, with one-time mortal foe Microsoft now embracing the open-source model. Whitehurst briefly shared the keynote stage with Wim Coekaerts, corporate vice president of enterprise open source at Microsoft, which is something that wouldn't have happened five years ago. Red Hat and Microsoft today partner at multiple levels, as the message and value of open source has continued to expand. During his keynote, Whitehurst said that it's hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about the history of Linux and vice versa, as the two are very much intertwined. Back in the 1990s when Red Hat got started a few years after Linux's birth, Whitehurst said his company didn't have a great business model. At one point, Red Hat actually tried to sell shrink-wrapped boxed software at big box retailers. Around 2001, Red Hat first introduced the enterprise open-source software model that is the core of the company's business today. The basic idea is to bundle open-source software together, test and certify the software, and then provide multiple years of enterprise-grade support.
  • Option Market: Red Hat Inc Risk Hits A Deteriorated Level
  • Building Fedora Rawhide Images with Imagefactory
  • Fedora 24 Release Party in Singapore
    As you might know, Fedora released its 24th version at the end of June! Recently, the Fedorans in Singapore had a party to celebrate the release. The release party was not only to celebrate its release, but also to commemorate Fedora’s open source journey so far. We invited people from different diverse background to join us for a night of fun and open conversations (Singapore is a cosmopolitan country!)

GNOME News

  • Sysprof + Builder
    After the GNOME 3.20 cycle completed I started revamping Sysprof. More here, here, and here. The development went so smoothly that I did a 3.20 release a couple of weeks later. A primary motivation of that work was rebuilding Sysprof into a set of libraries for building new tools. In particular, I wanted to integrate Sysprof with Builder as our profiler of choice. On my flight back from GUADEC I laid the groundwork to integrate these two projects. As of Builder 3.21.90 (released yesterday) you can now profile your project quite easily. There are more corner cases we need to handle but I consider those incremental bugs now.
  • GUADEC… Its been fun.
    I’m not really much of a traveler or outgoing in any way. So when I was invited to GUADEC, I wasn’t very sure about it. It took some encouragement from my mentor and a fellow GSoC mate to convince me. And… I’m glad I went! It was one of those things that I could not have experienced from my comfy chair to which I reserve myself for the greater part of my day. In fact this trip makes me feel I might be wrong about social interactions not being time well spent for me (but then again I don’t exactly buckle down into ambitious projects, so you’re free to call me ignorant).
  • gnome-boxes: GSoC Evaluation
    This post is meant to be a final self-evaluation and self-analysis of my work for gnome-boxes during the summer. The initial project idea was about implementing/fixing a bunch of SPICE-based features/bugs to/in Boxes. The list of bugs of the SPICE component has since changed, as some new bugs have been discovered and some old ones have been closed, so I made a summary of my involvement...

Paid-for Microsoft Openwashing at LinuxCon