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Saturday, 18 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Create your own custom distro images from Distroshare Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 10:51pm
Story Moto G Problems From Android 4.4 KitKat Update: Battery Drain, Airplane Mode Problems Rianne Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 7:44pm
Story Valve Updates SteamOS and Fixes the Custom-Built Compositor Rianne Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 7:35pm
Story The Best Features Of Linux 3.16 Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 7:33pm
Story Mesa 10.2.5 Rianne Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 7:31pm
Story X.Org Server 1.16, Rootless X Now Available For Arch Linux Rianne Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 7:21pm
Story Wine 1.7.23 released Rianne Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 7:16pm
Story The GPLv3 GPU Is Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 7:12pm
Story A year without Windows and a new love of Linux Rianne Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 7:08pm
Story When Linux Was Perfect Enough Rianne Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 6:58pm

Linux is ready for your desktop, and your business

Filed under
Linux

pcadvisor.co.uk/blogs: Linux? That's only for geeks, right? Like its forerunner Unix it conjures up visions of terminal windows and cryptic commands.

Qt 4.3.5: Two steps back and one step forward

Filed under
Software

trolltech.com/blogs: Earlier this month, we released the single, largest release of Qt since the 4.0.0 release two years ago. Qt 4.4.0 is the result of 10 months of hard work by the Trolls, including numerous distractions. And while it’s being digested by our clients and users, we’re working on Qt 4.4.1, which will include fixes for bugs that were already known at the time of the 4.4.0 release, as well as some that people have reported.

OOo Basic crash course: Creating a simple application launcher

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: In previous installments of the crash course, you've learned how to build a simple basket tool, a task manager, and even a word game. This time, let's take a look at how you can use the skills you picked up from those exercises to create a simple application launcher, which will allow you to start virtually any application without leaving the convenience of OpenOffice.org.

Linux On The Desktop: Who Cares

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Every so often, you read on Slashdot, Digg, or some other techie news site that Linux is finally ready for the desktop. It's finally to the point that any end user could sit down at a computer and happily compute away. The applications are sufficiently sanitized and Windows-like that even Grandma can use them. I think it's fair to say that most of our previous conceptions of "ready for the desktop" are moot points.

Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring review

Filed under
MDV

zdnet.co.uk: Linux distros are a bit like buses (bear with me on this) — miss one and another is bound to come along sooner or later. In the case of Mandriva Linux, it's the 2008 Spring edition that benefits from the usual long list of component updates together with full support for the Asus Eee PC, improved synchronisation with mobile devices, PulseAudio sound infrastructure and a handful of other enhancements.

Slackware 12.1 First Impressions

Filed under
Slack

ever-increasing-entropy.blogspot: Late last week I downloaded and installed Slackware 12.1 on my aging (OK, old) Toshiba laptop side by side with Vector Linux Light. My first impression: Slackware is still Slackware.

Is OpenOffice.org getting faster?

Filed under
OOo

oooninja.com: Some complain OpenOffice.org is slow and bloated. With each release there may be dozens of performance improvements, but there are also new features, some of which may slow things down. This the natural balance in software development, but in the end, what is the net effect on performance from one version to the next?

5 Extensions That I Wish Were Working In Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

maketecheasier.com: One of the feature that makes Firefox a great favorite among users is its huge library of extensions that improved both its functionality and user’s experience. While there are a good number of extensions that are ready for Firefox 3, there are also some of the great add-ons that are not compatible and are sorely missed by many. Here are 5.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux kernel compile secrets. Part 2

  • How To Patch Perl 5
  • Use the OR operator in grep to search for words and phrases
  • Clean up Ubuntu Junk Files
  • Best Method To Reboot Remote Linux / Windows / UNIX Server
  • Controlling desktop applications with six degrees of freedom
  • Ubuntu: Disabling Service on Startup
  • removing outdated ssh fingerprints from known_hosts with sed or … ssh-keygen
  • Fedora 9: Fix No Flash Sound Issue with Firefox 3.0

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Compro Technology responds to GPL accusations

  • Multi-Pointer X Merged To X.Org Master
  • Donnie Berkholz speaks with LinuxCrazy
  • Operation OOXML, Part 7 x 10512: The Appeals Arrive
  • Arora, a WebKit browser in Qt
  • Dependence, entitlement, victimhood
  • Linux Users: no MSDN downloads for you
  • GPL-Violations.org and FTF to work more closely together
  • Wikindx facilitates academic writing in a browser
  • Flock is top browser in PC World’s 100 Best Products
  • Open-Source ATI Driver Achieves Major R500 3D Success
  • What is KDE4 meaning to me (parody)
  • Linux green activists unite

Free software vs. software-as-a-service: Is the GPL too weak for the Web?

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: You’ve read the GPL’s preamble, you can name the Four Freedoms, and you do your best to keep proprietary bits off our computers. But what’s the future of free software in the era of Flickr, Google Apps, and Facebook?

Bluewhite64 Linux 12.1 "LiveDVD" just screwed my evening

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: Linux is already the same piece of shit as Windows. Period. Nothing stable. Nothing that would work in the next version. Bluewhite64 Linux 12.1 "LiveDVD" just screwed my evening. The problem is that the previous Bluewhite64 Linux 12.0 "LiveDVD" just worked, and now the 12.1 LiveDVD is a PITA.

OpenSUSE 11 Beta 3

Filed under
SUSE

lazytechguy.com: OpenSUSE 11 Beta 3 marks the end of Beta series of OpenSUSE 11. With final version scheduled to release in 22 days on 19th June 2008; I felt its time to test what is in-store for us. I was specially interested in the KDE4 version and the new installer.

Nonprofit chooses Ubuntu for servers, OpenOffice for desktops

Filed under
Ubuntu

techtarget.com: Oxford Archaeology, one of the largest independent excavation firms in Britain, has twin missions: discovering and preserving historical artifacts that might otherwise be destroyed by construction projects, and sharing its finds and experiences with visitors to increase their appreciation of archaeology and history.

2.6.26-rc4, "Things Are Calming Down"

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "You know the drill by now: another week, another -rc," began Linux creator, Linus Torvalds, announcing the 2.6.26-rc4 kernel. "There's a lot of small stuff in here", he continued, "most people won't even notice. "

Open source on the wire

Filed under
OSS

idg.no: Once upon a time, using open-source servers and applications for business was frowned upon in many circles. Today, you'd be hard pressed to find any sizeable infrastructure that doesn't leverage open-source code in some form or another.

EeePC 900 running 8.04 OOTB from ZaReason

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

ubuntu-rocks.org/blog: I picked up an Asus EeePC 900 from ZaReason and it arrived today. Now, on the order form it says Xandros but I mentioned in a comment that it would soon be running Ubuntu. Within two minutes of placing the order they replied saying they can put a basic Ubuntu install on it, so I said “heck yeah!”.

GNOME file manager gets tabbed file browsing

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Although Nautilus—the GNOME file manager—includes many useful features and offers an excellent implementation of the spatial paradigm, its browser mode is less impressive and is missing some must-have functionality. The Nautilus developers are about to deliver a big improvement, however, with the addition of full support for tabbed browsing.

Paying The "Linux Tax"

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com/blog: Most of us know about the "Windows Tax" -- the extra cash you shell out to pay for the cost of a Windows license when you buy a new PC. But what about a (so-called) "Linux Tax," the cost incurred by an ordinary user switching to Linux from Windows?

Mozilla makes Firefox 3.0 bug-fix decision

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. decided today to roll out a second release candidate for Firefox 3.0 that will include fixes for about 40 bugs. The alternative was to declare the open-source browser good "as is," then patch the problems with a later update.

Also: Mozilla Developer News May 27

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux 4.15, Linux 4.16, and Linux Foundation's CNCF and CII

  • Linux 4.15 Gets Fixed To Report Current CPU Frequency Via /proc/cpuinfo
    A change recently in the Linux kernel led the CPU MHz reported value via /proc/cpuinfo to either be the nominal CPU frequency or the most recently requested frequency. This behavior changed compared to pre-4.13 kernels while now it's been fixed up to report the current CPU frequency.
  • Linux 4.16 Will Be Another Big Cycle For Intel's DRM Driver
    We are just through week one of two for the Linux 4.15 merge window followed by eight or so weeks after that before this next kernel is officially released. But Intel's open-source driver developers have already begun building up a growing stack of changes for Linux 4.16 when it comes to their DRM graphics driver.
  • CNCF Wants You to Use 'Certified Kubernetes'
  • Open Source Threat Modeling
    Application threat modeling is a structured approach to identifying ways that an adversary might try to attack an application and then designing mitigations to prevent, detect or reduce the impact of those attacks. The description of an application’s threat model is identified as one of the criteria for the Linux CII Best Practises Silver badge.

Linux World Domination and Microsoft Corruption in Munich

Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING

  • 5 DevOps leadership priorities in 2018
    This week, DevOps professionals gathered in San Francisco to talk about the state of DevOps in the enterprise. At 1,400 attendees, the sold-out DevOps Enterprise Summit has doubled in size since 2014 – a testament to the growth of the DevOps movement itself. With an ear to this event and an eye on the explosion of tweets coming out of it, here are five key priorities we think IT leaders should be aware of as they take their DevOps efforts into the new year.
  • NumPy Plan for dropping Python 2.7 support
    The Python core team plans to stop supporting Python 2 in 2020. The NumPy project has supported both Python 2 and Python 3 in parallel since 2010, and has found that supporting Python 2 is an increasing burden on our limited resources; thus, we plan to eventually drop Python 2 support as well. Now that we're entering the final years of community-supported Python 2, the NumPy project wants to clarify our plans, with the goal of to helping our downstream ecosystem make plans and accomplish the transition with as little disruption as possible.
  • Google SLING: An Open Source Natural Language Parser
    Google Research has just released an open source project that might be of interest if you are into natural language processing. SLING is a combination of recurrent neural networks and frame based parsing. Natural language parsing is an important topic. You can get meaning from structure and parsing is how you get structure. It is important in processing both text and voice. If you have any hope that Siri, Cortana or Alexa are going to get any better then you need to have better natural language understanding - not just the slot and filler systems currently in use.