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Saturday, 10 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ten things a Linux Fanboy will not tell you: when you install linux

Filed under
Linux

Tryst with Linux: Yes, I read the list here. And as most lists are, it included somethings it shouldn’t have, and missed somethings it shouldn’t have. So, anyway, here’s my list (and perhaps my exaggerated confessional!) based/built on the earlier list.

A brief introduction to mutt-ng

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HowTos

Debian Administration: mutt is a well known and much loved mail client well suited to the efficient handling of a large volume of email. One of the things which makes it so powerful is its extreme flexibility and customisation options. The next-generation mutt package builds upon the core mutt with some additional features; most noticeably the introduction of a sidebar, which this article introduces.

How To Back Up MySQL Databases Without Interrupting MySQL

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HowTos

This article describes how you can back up MySQL databases without interrupting the MySQL service. Normally, when you want to create a MySQL backup, you either have to stop MySQL or issue a read lock on your MySQL tables in order to get a correct backup; if you do not do it this way, you can end up with an inconsistent backup. To get consistent backups without interrupting MySQL, I use a little trick: I replicate my MySQL database to a second MySQL server, and on the second MySQL server I use a cron job that creates regular backups of the replicated database.

Create high-quality Web graphs in minutes with Plotr

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HowTos

Linux.com: Need to add professional-looking graphs to your Web site? Using Plotr, you can do this in no time and with minimum fuss.

Preview websites with Cooliris

Filed under
Software

tectonic: Do you suffer from too many pages open on your browser? Do you compulsively have to open links, just out of curiosity of what might be on the other side? If so, Cooliris Preview may just be the solution for you.

Ooh, ooh, the bogeyman is gonna getcha with his stupid patents. Or maybe not.

Filed under
Microsoft

Groklaw: I'm being buried alive in email about the Fortune article about Microsoft's patent saber rattling, which I thought so unimportant I put it in News Picks earlier. Here's why I'm not unduly worried so far.

Open Source: Can software truly ever be 'free'?

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OSS

mywesttexas: There is a revolution going on. Since the dawn of the Computer Age, software developers have met in small groups to discuss the unthinkable, Free Software. In these times, even a kindergartner knows that there's no such thing as a free lunch... or is there?

Does Tux500 violate the Linux trademark?

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Linux

Penguin Pete: One difference between corporate sponsorship and a... uh... crew of private individuals is that corporations have the forethought to establish that they have the legal blessings of the brand they intend to market before marketing it.

Questions Answered, Questions Posed - What Happened to Tux500?

Filed under
Linux

Blog of Helios: One hundred and seven emails were actionable questions or comments concerning the Tux500 project. Those questions or comments were broken down into catagory and because they address important matters in the community, I have decided that some of them need answered sooner than I can physically get to them individually. Herein, I will address them by catagory.

What is the difference between Shell Commands and Linux Commands?

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HowTos

About.com: The Linux / Unix operating systems come with many commands that the user can enter into the computer from the keyboard and use to interact with the computer. There are two kinds of commands that come with a Linux / Unix operating system: Shell Commands and Linux/Unix Commands. Here is a comparison of the two:

Using netselect-apt - Tip to select the fastest Debian mirror

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HowTos

All about Linux: Each time I install Debian - and I have done it scores of times on multiple machines, I get frustrated in choosing the right Debian mirror for updating the package database on my machine using 'apt-get update', or installing a new package for that matter.

How to install Ubuntu Studio in Windows using VirtualBox - a complete walkthrough

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HowTos

Simplehelp: This tutorial will take you every single step of the way through installing Ubuntu Studio using VirtualBox for Windows. In other words, even your parents should be able to follow along.

Why software commoditisation is a myth

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OSS

ComputerWorld: “Software prices will eventually fall to zero. The open-source software movement has already started that commoditisation.”

AMD Radeon HD 2900XT Preview

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

Phoronix: It's late, but it's finally here. This morning AMD will be formally announcing their long-awaited Radeon HD 2000 series, or perhaps better known as the ATI R600 GPU. his morning we have our technology preview of ATI/AMD's next generation GPUs along with what's in store for Linux and the R600 series support.

KDE Commit-Digest for 13th May 2007

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KDE

dot.kde.org: In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: The KOffice ODF weekend sprint takes place in Berlin. KTuberling, the much-loved "potato man" game, is saved for inclusion in kdegames for KDE 4, with the start of porting to SVG and other general improvements. Rewrite of KPoker replaces the previous implementation. Xinerama improvements in the KWin window manager.

Also: KDE 4: systemsettings and general configuration

Compare two files side-by-side with Kompare

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HowTos

FOSSwire: If you’re a command line expert, you undoubtedly know about the diff and patch tools, which let you see the difference between two files and then create or apply patch files from those differences respectively. Sometimes though, it’s nice to get a graphical look.

Education, education, education

Filed under
OLPC
OSS

FreeSoftwareMagazine: I heard a phrase today that reminded me of my childhood: “...learning and sharing together”. I’m not sure if I ever heard this exact phrase, but it was definitely a theme that was central to my early education; it’s now a central theme of my life again, this time through free software.

Microsoft takes on the free world

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Microsoft

CNN: Microsoft claims that free software like Linux, which runs a big chunk of corporate America, violates 235 of its patents. It wants royalties from distributors and users. Users like you, maybe. Fortune's Roger Parloff reports.

KOffice ODF Sprint Kickoff

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The day before the real start of the KOffice meeting in Berlin, most developers had already arrived. After checking in and having dinner, they started hacking away at the KDAB office. Read on to learn about how this went and the plans the developers have for KOffice 2 and the coming weekend!

Solaris can never be Linux

Filed under
OS

iTWire: Whenever I hear the words Sun Microsystems and open source mentioned together I can't help but laugh. The latest bit of spiel which juxtaposes these words comes from a credentialled person - but the words are extremely tired.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

  • Improving Storage Performance with Ceph and Flash
    Ceph is a storage system designed to be used at scale, with clusters of Ceph in deployment in excess of 40 petabytes today. At LinuxCon Europe, Allen Samuels, Engineering Fellow at Western Digital, says that Ceph has been proven to scale out reasonably well. Samuels says, “the most important thing that a storage management system does in the clustered world is to give you availability and durability,” and much of the technology in Ceph focuses on controlling the availability and the durability of your data. In his presentation, Samuels talks not just about some of the performance advantages to deploying Ceph on Flash, but he also goes into detail about what they are doing to optimize Ceph in future releases.
  • Ceph and Flash by Allen Samuels, Western Digital
  • Red Hat Opens Up OpenShift Dedicated to Google Cloud Platform
    When businesses and enterprises begin adopting data center platforms that utilize containerization, then and only then can we finally say that the container trend is sweeping the planet. Red Hat’s starter option for containerization platforms is OpenShift Dedicated — a public cloud-based, mostly preconfigured solution, which launched at this time last year on Amazon AWS.
  • Volatility Numbers in View for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Rhizome is working on an open-source tool to help archive digital content
    "The stability of this kind of easy archiving for document storage, review and revision is a great possibility, but the workflow for journalists is very specific, so the grant will allow us to figure out how it could function." Another feature of Webrecorder that journalists might find appealing, and one of the software's core purposes, is to preserve material that might be deleted or become unavailable in time. However, the tool is currently operated under a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Takedown policy. This means any individual can ask for a record of their web presence or materials to be removed, so Rhizome will be working to "answer the more complicated questions and figure out policies" around privacy and copyright with the latest round of funding.
  • An ode to releasing software
    There is one particular moment in every Free and Open Source Software project: it’s the time when the software is about to get released. The software has been totally frozen of course, QA tests have been made, all the lights are green; the website still needs to be updated with the release notes, perhaps some new content and of course the stable builds have to be uploaded. The release time is always a special one. The very day of the release, there is some excitement and often a bit of stress. The release manager(s), as well as everyone working on the project’s infrastructure are busy making sure everything is ready when the upload of the stable version of the software, binaries and source, has been completed. In many cases, some attention is paid to the main project’s mirror servers so that the downloads are fluid and work (mostly) flawlessly as soon as the release has been pushed and published.
  • Diversity Scholarship Series: My Time at CloudNativeCon 2016
    CloudNativeCon 2016 was a wonderful first conference for me and although the whirlwind of a conference is tiring, I left feeling motivated and inspired. The conference made me feel like I was a part of the community and technology I have been working with daily.
  • WordPress 4.7 Content Management System Provides New Design Options
    WordPress is among the most widely used open-source technologies in the world, powering more than 70 million websites. WordPress 4.7 was released Dec. 6, providing a new milestone update including new features for both users and developers. As is typically the case with new WordPress releases, there is also a new default theme in the 4.7 update. The 2017 theme provides users with a number of interesting attributes including the large feature image as well as the ability to have a video as part of the header image. The Theme Customizer feature enables users to more intuitively adjust various elements of a theme, to fit the needs of websites that use will upgrade to WordPress 4.7. In addition, the new custom CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) feature within a theme preview lets users quickly see how style changes will change the look of a site. As an open-source project, WordPress benefits from participation of independent contributors and for the 4.7 release there were 482 contributors. In this slideshow eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the WordPress 4.7 release.
  • Psychology Professor Releases Free, Open-Source, Preprint Software
    The Center for Open Science, directed by University of Virginia psychology professor Brian Nosek, has launched three new services to more quickly share research data as the center continues its mission to press for openness, integrity and reproducibility of scientific research. Typically, researchers send preprint manuscripts detailing their research findings to peer-reviewed academic journals, such as Nature and Science. The review process can take months or even years before publication – if the research is published at all. By contrast, “preprinting,” or sharing non-peer-reviewed research results online, enables crucial data to get out to the community the moment it is completed. That, said Nosek, is critical.
  • Integral Ad Science Launches Open Source SDK to Drive Mobile Innovation for the Advertising Industry
  • Tullett Prebon Information, Quaternion and Columbia University form open source risk collaboration
  • Tullett Prebon Information And Quaternion Risk Management Partner To Enhance Transparency And Standardisation In Risk Modelling – Partnership Fuels Columbia University Research To Improve Understanding Of Systemic Risk
  • Integral Ad Science Partners with Google, Others for Open Source Viewability
  • DoomRL creator makes free roguelike open-source to try and counter Zenimax legal threat
  • DoomRL Goes Open-Source in Face of Copyright Claims
    Earlier this week, ZeniMax Medi hit DoomRL, a popular roguelike version of the original first-person shooter, with a cease-and-desist order. This order instructed producer ChaosForge to remove the free downloadable game to prevent further legal action. Instead of taking it down, co-creator Kornel Kisielewicz turned the game open-source.
  • This Indian software company just partnered with the world’s biggest open source community
    In what can be called a major motivation for Indian tech firms, Amrut Software, an end-to-end Software, BPO services and solutions provider has become a GitHub distributor for India region. GitHub hosts world’s biggest open source community along with the most popular version control systems, configuration management and collaboration tools for software developers. It has some of the largest installations of repositories in the world.
  • Python 3.6 released with many new improvements and features
    Python,the high-level interpreted programming language is now one of the most preferred programming language by beginners and professional-level developers.So,here Python 3.6 is now available with many changes,improvements and of course the ease of Python was not left in the work list.

Security Leftovers