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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 27 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox developer to open San Francisco office srlinuxx 22/04/2011 - 2:24am
Story Yes, There Are Portal 2 Linux References srlinuxx 22/04/2011 - 2:22am
Story A failure of logic srlinuxx 22/04/2011 - 2:19am
Story Preview of Fedora 15 srlinuxx 22/04/2011 - 2:18am
Story Scientific Linux 6 - Another great distro, but srlinuxx 21/04/2011 - 11:51pm
Story Linux Doesn't Need To Kiss Anyone's Ass srlinuxx 21/04/2011 - 11:50pm
Story Iptables – It’s a Better Application! srlinuxx 21/04/2011 - 11:48pm
Story Ubuntu 11.04: The desktop Linux you’ve been waiting for? srlinuxx 21/04/2011 - 11:36pm
Blog entry Downtime srlinuxx 1 21/04/2011 - 10:28pm
Story openSUSE servers with one click srlinuxx 21/04/2011 - 10:00pm

Ubuntu 6.10 "Edgy Eft" review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

While still far from perfect, Ubuntu 6.10 "Edgy Eft" is both an improvement over the so-called "long-term support" release and a decent operating system in its own right. It's in a much better place than any other free-of-charge operating system has been before now, but I don't think it'll give any commercial operating systems a run for their money.

Have we raised a generation of technology drones?

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Misc

I received an interesting note today from the school my children attend. In order to save precious dollars, last school year, I suggested that they begin using OpenOffice and only install Microsoft Office where there are licenses. The note I received today listed computer needs, and one of the needs listed as "Because Open Office is a lesser program compared to the Microsoft office programs, it would be helpful to have either tutorials or at least manuals for these programs."

Review: Fluxbuntu nBuild1 Revision2

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is without a doubt one of the fastest growing desktop Linux distributions. It is so popular that it has sprouted many derivatives. One of which is Fluxbuntu.

Closing Open-Source Gaps by Developing a Policy

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OSS

Open-source software is becoming ubiquitous, but companies need to be aware that its use must be carefully managed. Problems can arise because many open-source licenses require that users who incorporate open-source code in their software must make their code available for free (at reproduction cost), permit modifications of the software and permit redistribution without charging a fee.

Shell Scripting, oooh...its easy

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HowTos

Shell scripting is nothing but a group of commands put together and executed one after another in a sequential way. Let's start by mentioning the steps to write and execute a shell script.

Open Source Procurement Turns Out To Be A Dud

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OSS

More than twelve months after the NSW Department of Commerce announced approved suppliers of open source software and services to state government agencies, there hasn't been a single sale prompting a review to evaluate and improve the contract.

Printing in OpenOffice.org Calc, Part 2: Print selection and printer options

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HowTos

In part 1 of this entry, I discussed how to use Calc's page styles to control how spreadsheets print. However, although page styles are one of the most useful tools for the task, they are far from the only ones. How you setup pages for printing and the printer or export options are also part of the arsenal.

FreeCol 0.5.2 Released

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Gaming

Version 0.5.2 of FreeCol, a free/open-source Colonization clone, has been released.

A Quick Look at Damn Small Linux 3.0.1

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

By this point, everyone has heard of Damn Small Linux (DSL). When it comes to packing a full-featured Linux desktop environment into something as small as a pendrive, no one does it better than DSL. DSL uses Knoppix technology to boot and run from a live CD.

Support for Broadcom wireless : Ubuntu (6.06.1 / 6.10)

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HowTos

Since the release of Ubuntu (6.06.1) “Dapper Drake” there have been some great improvements in support for wireless and broadcom chipsets. You no longer need to configure ndiswrapper for wireless support. This supports *MOST* broadcom chipsets.

Another Sabayon Linux 3.2 Look (from a non-Gentoo user)

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Linux

Sabayon Linux is a Gentoo based distribution that is designed to be easy to install and configure. Savvy Linux users know that Gentoo is a "roll your own" distribution where you create your own distro from scratch--installing and compiling all your programs. They say you learn a lot of Linux by doing a Gentoo install, and that you end up with a very speedy system optimized to your specific needs.

What about those of us who want to try the Gentoo experience without taking several days to get it up and running?

Then Sabayon Linux is for you.

Java on Debian including Firefox plugin

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HowTos

Here you’ve got a comprehensive guide of installing Java on Debian GNU/Linux and enabling it on Firefox.

World of Warcraft on OpenSuse Linux 10.1

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HowTos

While I’ve been off doing my own thing, the Wine team has been hard at work and they’ve done some amazing things. So I turned to Wine for the first time in years. I read about some very positive experiences with WoW on Wine under other Linux distros. So I was able to just copy my existing installed copy of WoW off my laptop on to my Suse box using a Samba shared folder.

Spice in Linux

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HowTos

Woh….spice girls har, where where?? Haha…is in Linux machine. SPICE is stand for ‘Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis’ and was inspired by the application to IC design, which made computer simulation mandatory. To run a simulation in Linux, you will need a ng-spice and you can freely download from this here.

Package search by file and on-demand package installation Using auto-apt

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HowTos

auto-apt is a program that checks file access of programs running within auto-apt environments. If a program will access a file of uninstalled package, auto-apt will install the package containing the file, by using apt-get.

Securing NFS

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HowTos

NFS is a network protocol with which many UNIX-administrators have a love/hate relationship. On the one hand, it’s the ideal protocol if you need to export a filesystem from a UNIX-like system. On the other, it has a bit of a reputation of being insecure.

How To Compile A Kernel - The CentOS Way

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HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on CentOS systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.

Geeks and coders get support from government, corporations

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OSS

It was started as a movement of long-haired geeks and coders, but today the Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) network is now seeing some big corporate names and government institutions backing it with funding and support in various ways.

Ubuntu Tool Highlight: StartUp-Manager - Configure GRUB and Usplash

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Software

While perusing the Ubuntu forums for a way to fix my disappeared bootup and shutdown usplash, I found this great new tool for Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy) called StartUp-Manager or SUM.

Set Up Ubuntu-Server 6.10 As A Firewall/Gateway For Your Small Business Environment

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a Ubuntu 6.10 server (Edgy Eft) as a firewall and gateway for small/medium networks. The article covers the installation/configuration of services such as Shorewall, NAT, caching nameserver, DHCP server, VPN server, Webmin, Munin, Apache, Squirrelmail, Postfix, Courier IMAP and POP3, SpamAssassin, ClamAV, and many more.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.6.5

I'm announcing the release of the 4.6.5 kernel. All users of the 4.6 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.6.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.6.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... thanks, greg k-h Read more Also: Linux 4.4.16 Linux 3.14.74

today's leftovers

Leftovers: Software

  • The Linux Deepin File Manager Is a Thing of Beauty
    China-based Linux distro Deepin has shown off its all-new desktop file manager. And to say it's pretty is an understatement.
  • GRadio Lets You Find, Listen to Radio Stations from the Ubuntu Desktop
    Love to listen to the radio? My ol’ pal Lolly did. But let’s say you want to listen to the radio on Ubuntu. How do you do it? Well, the Ubuntu Software centre should always be the first dial you try, but you’ll need to sift through a load of static to find a decent app.
  • Reprotest 0.2 released, with virtualization support
    reprotest 0.2 is available in PyPi and should hit Debian soon. I have tested null (no container, build on the host system), schroot, and qemu, but it's likely that chroot, Linux containers (lxc/lxd), and quite possibly ssh are also working. I haven't tested the autopkgtest code on a non-Debian system, but again, it probably works. At this point, reprotest is not quite a replacement for the prebuilder script because I haven't implemented all the variations yet, but it offers better virtualization because it supports qemu, and it can build non-Debian software because it doesn't rely on pbuilder.
  • Calibre 2.63.0 eBook Converter and Viewer Adds Unicode 9.0 Support, Bugfixes
    Kovid Goyal has released yet another maintenance update for his popular, open-source, free, and cross-platform Calibre ebook library management software, version 2.63.0. Calibre 2.63.0 arrives two weeks after the release of the previous maintenance update, Calibre 2.62.0, which introduced support for the new Kindle Oasis ebook reader from Amazon, as well as reading and writing of EPUB 3 metadata. Unfortunately, there aren't many interesting features added in the Calibre 2.63.0 release, except for the implementation of Unicode 9.0 support in the regex engine of the Edit Book feature that lets users edit books that contain characters encoded with the recently released Unicode 9.0 standard.
  • Mozilla Delivers Improved User Experience in Firefox for iOS
    When we rolled out Firefox for iOS late last year, we got a tremendous response and millions of downloads. Lots of Firefox users were ecstatic they could use the browser they love on the iPhone or iPad they had chosen. Today, we’re thrilled to release some big improvements to Firefox for iOS. These improvements will give users more speed, flexibility and choice, three things we care deeply about.
  • LibreOffice 5.2 Is Being Released Next Wednesday
    One week from today will mark the release of LibreOffice 5.2 as the open-source office suite's latest major update. LibreOffice 5.2 features a new (optional) single toolbar mode, bookmark improvements. new Calc spreadsheet functions (including forecasting functions), support for signature descriptions, support for OOXML signature import/export, and a wealth of other updates. There are also GTK3 user-interface improvements, OpenGL rendering improvements, multi-threaded 3D rendering, faster rendering, and more.
  • Blackmagic Design Finally Introduces Fusion 8 For Linux
  • Why Microsoft’s revival of Skype for Linux is a big deal [Ed: This article is nonsense right from the headline. Web client is not Linux support. And it's spyware (centralised too).]

today's howtos