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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

2008: A year of the Linux Distillery in review

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: As 2008 draws its final breath let's reflect on some of the highlights of the year. There were major new FOSS releases, battles with Microsoft, arguments to further the cause of Linux as a viable server and desktop platform and more.

Thunderbird 2.0.0.19 security and stability release now available

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: As part of Mozilla Corporation’s ongoing stability and security update process, Thunderbird 2.0.0.19 is now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux as a free download from www.getthunderbird.com.

Ubuntu Year in Review 2008

Filed under
Ubuntu

boredandblogging.com: With 2008 coming to an end, I started thinking about the time I’ve spent in the Ubuntu community. Good thing I only remembered the fun part.

Intel opens Netbook Linux centre

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computerworlduk.com: A new centre aimed at speeding the development of mobile computing devices around the Linux-based Moblin OS opened in Taipei.

The Disaster of the Rolling Release

Filed under
Linux

ofb.biz: I love poking around operating systems. Lately, one aspect of this has gotten tiring in every Open Source operating system: the rolling release. The phrase refers to the sometimes feverish effort to add new features, long before the old ones even work properly.

some leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Quiz: Australia's contribution to Linux and open source

  • Creating executable of Shell Script
  • Adobe Flash Plugin on Fedora 10
  • How to Create Swap Space After a Ubuntu Installation Without Re-Installing Ubuntu
  • How to determine your free disk space in Linux
  • ps - How to check the running processes on Linux
  • PCLinuxOS N1PTT-TR5
  • Will open source be lost in clouds in 2009?
  • A gentle introduction to video encoding, part 3
  • New Year,s Eve News: Unix And Linux Users Beware
  • The Lip: Episode 49 #!Crunchbang
  • Unix And Linux Easter Eggs For The Wrong Holiday
  • SCO to file bankruptcy plan tomorrow
  • Chilean anti-piracy law drafted on pirated software

Is open sourcing Domino a good idea?

Filed under
OSS

stormyscorner.com: Ian Tree has written an open letter to IBM asking them to release Domino under an open source license. While I agree with him that open sourcing Domino could have lots of positive effects, he's ignoring the cost and time involved.

Seven Predictions for Open Source in 2009

Filed under
OSS

ddj.com: 2008 was an eventful, breakthrough year for many open source companies, and 2009 will be even more so, especially in terms of business purchasing patterns, software business model shifts, and enterprise software stack evolution.

Amazon.com: The Key to Ubuntu Server Edition’s Success?

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: As you may have heard, Ubuntu is leaping from desktop computers all the way to Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). Although Ubuntu Server Edition 8.10 on Amazon EC2 remains in beta, the Amazon relationship could energize Canonical’s server strategy.

Windows 7: What does ‘feature complete’ mean?

Filed under
Microsoft

Mary Jo Foley: Now that Beta 1 — which the Windows team built on December 12, 2008 — has started leaking on torrents and is poised to make its public debut at the Consumer Electronics show, it’s time to revisit that “feature-complete” promise.

A Disconnect from the Real World

Filed under
Misc

lovehateubuntu.blogspot: After reading both Jeff Atwood's article and Joel Spolsky's response to a discussion topic, I'm wondering if these guys really live in the real world of programming or not. These two also don't seem to understand that there is a difference between programming and software development.

Lugaru shows why game devs should support OS X and Linux

Filed under
Linux

tuaw.com: Jeff Rosen of Wolfire Games has an intriguing post up about why developers of videogames like himself should go out of their way to support the OS X and Linux markets.

Widgets on Ubuntu

linuxloop.com: Windows Vista has gadgets, Mac OS X has widgets, KDE users have plasmoids, but what if your an Ubuntu user?

A Diatribe Against OpenOffice, But What's the Real Agenda?

ostatic.com: Matt Asay weighs in today on whether OpenOffice is "profoundly sick," as Novell employee Michael Meeks claims it is. Meeks argues that OpenOffice is "not getting better with age." I get the strong sense that he has an agenda that may not be apparent at first glance.

Google and the Desktop Linux Experiment

earthweb.com: Linux on the desktop faces some nasty realities in 2009, including a vastly improved Windows 7, an increasing use of the MacOS, and a broader move by Google with their proprietary Linux solution currently called Android.

One Month In Linux Audio

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: This week I'm bringing you news of of updates, upgrades, and new releases in the world of Linux audio software. Development in this world is continuously productive, so I'll present only a selection of the Linux sound and music applications and utilities announced in the month of November in the year 2008.

Why Ubuntu users should care about Debian

Filed under
Linux

arstechnica.com: The Ubuntu Linux distribution has attracted a broad audience of Linux enthusiasts, and it's beginning to gain traction among mainstream computer users. Although Ubuntu is relatively new, it builds on the rich history and deep roots of the venerable Debian project. The fate of the two popular flavors of Linux is as inextricably bound.

Municipalities open their GIS systems to citizens

linux.com: Many public administrations already use open source Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to let citizens look at public geographic data trough dedicated Web sites. Others use the same software to partially open the data gathering process.

Myth: Linux Doesn't Need a Registry Cleaner

Filed under
Software

bleachbit.blogspot: Some say Linux's .rpm and .deb installation packages uninstall cleanly, so there is no need for any registry cleaners like CCleaner. Here are a few counterexamples to the myth:

Great Linux Innovations Of 2008

Filed under
Linux
Software

phoronix.com: Last year we had looked at The Greatest Linux Innovations Of 2007, and as this year ends, we have compiled a similar list of what we believe were some of the greatest Linux innovations or achievements of 2008.

Also: Open source in 2008: Everything but interest is up

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.