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Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers & such

Filed under
News
  • VMware Tools Available as Open Source

  • All systems go for validation of updated OpenSSL module
  • Dell E521 and PCLinuxOS 2007 Final
  • Defining Scheduler Task Groups
  • FSOSS 2007 Coming Up!
  • FOSSCamp 2007
  • Linux 2.6.23-rc6
  • Legal summits to tackle Linux
  • IRC Part 2 - Managing a Channel
  • Linux Ping command explained
  • Linux Done Right: A user’s pleasant surprise
  • Another brave horseman steps up
  • Linux kernel enable the IOMMU - input / output memory management unit support
  • Open Source Outlook Choices
  • Plan of Action for Building Communities
  • Windows Vista Aero vs Linux Ubuntu Beryl

Dell releases custom Ubuntu 7.04 ISOs with drivers and fixes

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica: Dell has released a custom "remastered" Ubuntu 7.04 installation CD ISO that can be used to install Ubuntu on an Inspiron 1420 or 530. The ISO automatically installs all of the drivers and fixes that are required to make Ubuntu fully functional on those systems.

Using Cedega to play Windows games

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: Many of you, Linux users, have Windows installed on your PCs for only one reason: it’s a game or a program, written only for the Redmond’s system. In the last few months true alternatives have appeared: Cedega and CrossOverOffice.

Mozilla shows mock-up of Firefox 3.0's Places

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld: Mozilla has posted mock-ups of Places, one of the most-awaited new features in the upcoming Firefox 3.0., on its Web site. The Places Organizer mock-up uses Windows-Vista styling to show bookmarks, surfing history and downloads in one spot.

A very quick look at elive

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress.com: elive was the last stop on this little four-day distro-hopping junket for the ugly little laptop, and to be honest, I only tried it because someone suggested it on one of the other reviewlets. I’m glad I took a look though: This is a very impressive desktop.

Wearing the Red Hat: A review of CentOS 3.9

Filed under
Linux

CLICK: It's not in the "one small step for man" category, but my quest to run something -- anything -- from Red Hat on my VIA C3 Samuel-equipped test box has finally been successful. But not without a lot of effort.

PC- BSD Day 7: Ports of Call

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: Today I spend most of day on a Windows box. Alas, but my boss won’t allow anything but Windows on the workfloor. When the time to play is in short supply I automatically focus on the tools that are created to make life easy. That focus was on graphical front-ends for the ports collection.

this and that

Filed under
News
  • Canonical to Provide Optimized Ubuntu OS Layer for VMware Virtual Appliances

  • Corner(ed) Office?
  • Eve Online Coming to Mac, Linux
  • Linux on the Mac
  • The RPM Fusion Project
  • Reboot a locked Linux box with the Magic SysRq Keys
  • Sun Solaris upgrade snuggles with Linux

An open source "Second Life" for Linden Lab

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Linden Lab, the creator of online virtual community Second Life, released its viewer earlier this year with a GPL 2.0 license, adding a clause called the "FLOSS exception," which releases developers using certain open source licenses from the requirement that any derivative works be licensed under the GPL.

Vector Linux 5.9-Pseudo64-0.1 -- Finally, 64-bit Vector

Filed under
Linux

Caitlyn Martin: The first public Pseudo (alpha) release of Vector Linux 5.9 is now available. Normally a release like this wouldn’t be worth blogging about. It’s early development code. The point? There’s a 64-bit version.

FOSS in business?

Filed under
OSS

newyork-ubuntu: I am looking for people who are involved in businesses in New York, preferably non IT related businesses who have switched to using Free and Open Source Software. If you know of anyone who fits this description who would be willing to share their experience with the United Nations on Oct 16, please contact Nathan Eckenrode.

Is Linux Really Ready for Simple Users? (Part 1 of 8)

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: This engaging and insightful eight-part series by Kim Brebach, a consultant with an Australian technology marketing group, explores the suitability of desktop Linux for ordinary computer users. Follow Brebach's often-amusing foils and fumbles as he investigates a veritable alphabet soup of Linux distributions -- from Damn Small Linux to Zenwalk.

Running KDE on the Nokia N770 and N800

Filed under
KDE

arstechncia: An intrepid Internet Tablet Talk forum member with the handle "Penguinbait" has provided instructions explaining how to install KDE 3.5.6 on the Nokia 770 and N800 web tablet devices. Not for the faint of heart, the instructions require a bit of command-line work.

Also: KMLDonkey on KDE4
And: KDE-EDU 4.0 Polishing on Saturday

Countries' Comments on MS OOXML - How You Can Help

Filed under
OSS

groklaw: I think I see a way we could be really helpful to the ISO folks having to sort through all the 10,000 comments the various countries filed with their votes on MS OOXML.

some howtos & such

Filed under
HowTos
  • Zimbra or Google Calendar with Thunderbird and Lightning

  • Implementing quotas to restrict disk space usage
  • Transparent Terminal Windows
  • Increase the maximum number of pseudo - terminals ~ PTY on Linux for remote Login session
  • Installing Ubuntu From A Windows System With Wubi

Open source in the UK: investigate, approve and ignore

Filed under
OSS

CBR: Over a year ago CBR published a look at the UK's adoption of open source software in the UK and promised a later update. That update is long overdue, and is also timely given that tomorrow some of the leading open source advocates in the country will gather in Westminster to debate the future of open source in this country.

Microsoft, Novell Win Key Linux Customers

Filed under
SUSE

informationweek: Add Siemens and BMW to the list of major corporations that have agreed to buy Novell(NOVL)'s Linux software and services through Microsoft(MSFT).

Ubuntu On The Road To Bloat

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Free Desktop: I boot my Ubuntu laptop and log in. Shortly after logging in, the IO onslaught begins. I open up a terminal and 'top' exposes the offender 'trackerd'. I begin the motion to kill it. This is a familiar sequence for me, something I have done every day since, well, so long ago I can't remember the exact day I started doing it. A few weeks, at least.

Compiz Fusion 0.5.2 - Review

Filed under
Software

lunapark: For the next round of Linux Releases (Ubuntu Gutsy, Fedora 8, OpenSuse 10.3, Mandriva 2008 etc) Compiz Fusion should be installed by default in those releases and with the release date looming not far ahead the time is ripe to give you a preview of what to expect from the latest Compiz Fusion.

Grouping Pages By Mobility

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "The objective of this patchset is to keep the system in a state where actions such as page reclaim or memory compaction will reduce external fragmentation in the system," Mel Gorman described his set of thirteen patches labeled "reduce external fragmentation by grouping pages by mobility v30".

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Blockchain Startups Venture Beyond Bitcoin
    Bitcoin is the most widely-known example of blockchain-based technology, but many of today's startups are looking past the cryptocurrency and towards other, more business-friendly implementations. European blockchain startup incubator Outlier Ventures and Frost & Sullivan have mapped out the blockchain startup landscape, identifying several key areas of activity. It outlines possible paths to success following a busy year for blockchain investments.
  • Another Sandy Bridge Era Motherboard Now Supported By Coreboot
    The Sapphire Pure Platinum H61 is the latest motherboard to be supported by mainline Coreboot for replacing the board's proprietary BIOS.
  • OSI Welcomes the Journal of Open Source Software as Affiliate Member
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), a global non-profit organization formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, announced that the Journal Of Open Source Software (JOSS), a peer-reviewed journal for open source research software packages, is now an OSI affiliate member.
  • Open source project uses Docker for serverless computing
    Serverless computing has fast become a staple presence on major clouds, from Amazon to Azure. It’s also inspiring open source projects designed to make the concept of functions as a service useful to individual developers. The latest of these projects, called simply Functions as a Service (FaaS) by developer and Linux User contributor Alex Ellis, uses Docker and its native Swarm cluster management technology to package any process as a function available through a web API.
  • PyCharm 2017.1, MicroStrategy 2017.1, Next.js 2.0, and Ubuntu 17.04 final beta released — SD Times news digest: March 27, 2017
  • Open source JavaScript, Node.js devs get NPM Orgs for free
    The SaaS-based tool, which features capabilities like role-based access control, semantic versioning, and package discovery, now can be used on public code on the NPM registry, NPM Inc. said on Wednesday. Developers can transition between solo projects, public group projects, and commercial projects, and users with private registries can use Orgs to combine code from public and private packages into a single project.
  • Slaying Monoliths at Netflix with Node.js
    The growing number of Netflix subscribers -- nearing 85 million at the time of this Node.js Interactive talk -- has generated a number of scaling challenges for the company. In his talk, Yunong Xiao, Principal Software Engineer at Netflix, describes these challenges and explains how the company went from delivering content to a global audience on an ever-growing number of platforms, to supporting all modern browsers, gaming consoles, smart TVs, and beyond. He also looks at how this led to radically modifying their delivery framework to make it more flexible and resilient.
  • Mudlet, the open source MUD client has a new major stable build available
    I don't know how many of you play MUDs, but Mudlet, an open source cross-platform MUD client has hit version 3.0.

today's howtos

Minimal Linux Live

Minimal Linux Live is, as the name suggests, a very minimal Linux distribution which can be run live from a CD, DVD or USB thumb drive. One of the things which set Minimal Linux Live (MLL) apart from other distributions is that, while the distribution is available through a 7MB ISO file download, the project is designed to be built from source code using a shell script. The idea is that we can download scripts that will build MLL on an existing Linux distribution. Assuming we have the proper compiler tools on our current distribution, simply running a single shell script and waiting a while will produce a bootable ISO featuring the MLL operating system. Yet another option the MLL project gives us is running the distribution inside a web browser using a JavaScript virtual machine. The browser-based virtual machine running MLL can be found on the project's website, under the Emulator tab. This gives us a chance to try out the operating system in our web browser without installing or building anything. I decided to try the MLL build process to see if it would work and how long it would take if everything went smoothly. I also wanted to find out just how much functionality such a small distribution could offer. The project's documentation mostly covers building MLL on Ubuntu and Linux Mint and so I decided to build MLL on a copy of Ubuntu 16.04 I had running in a virtual machine. The steps to build MLL are fairly straight forward. On Ubuntu, we first install six packages to make sure we have all the required dependencies. Then we download an archive containing MLL's build scripts. Then we unpack the archive and run the build script. We just need to type four commands in Ubuntu's virtual terminal to kick-start the build process. Read more

GCC Compiler Tests At A Variety Of Optimization Levels Using Clear Linux

For those curious about the impact of GCC compiler optimization levels, a variety of benchmarks were carried out using GCC 6.3 on Intel's Clear Linux platform. Read more Also: LLVM 4.0.1 Planning, Aiming For Better Stable Releases