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About Tux Machines

Friday, 25 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story CrunchBang: The Rest of the Story Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 9:41am
Story Linux 3.20 To Land VirtIO 1.0 Implementation Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 9:29am
Story Bodhi 3.0 Released, Top 11 Distros for 2015 Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 9:27am
Story Video Phone Review and Wider Thoughts Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 9:21am
Story KF5 Porting Progress Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 9:14am
Story Review: Nvidia's Android-powered Shield tablet is actually great for gaming Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 9:05am
Story “Has Linux lost its way?” comments prompt a Debian developer to revisit FreeBSD after 20 years Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 9:03am
Story Why should you consider using a Linux-based system for music making? Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 12:47am
Story Hostkey rotation, redux Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2015 - 11:42pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2015 - 10:52pm

Ubuntu 8.10 - It’s Great But With A Couple Of Problems

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.programmerslog.com: I am in the process of making my desktop computer into a work computer by removing Windows XP and going down the Ubuntu (8.10 Intrepid Ibex) route. I thought I’d share some of the problems I had.

Smokin' Guns stand alone game released

Filed under
Gaming

linux-gamers.net: The Smokin' Guns game started its life under the name of Western Quake³. It was originally developed by a team known as Iron Claw Interactive. They released WQ3 beta 2.0 in 2003, after which development all but ceased. With the release of the stand alone version in 2008, the game was renamed to Smokin' Guns,

7 Best Free/Open-source Backup Software for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: If you are using Linux, there are plenty of backup software to choose from. I have here a list of some of the best free and open source backup software that you may want to check out.

The Rewriting of Open Source History

Filed under
OSS

seekingalpha.com: The open source blogosphere featured two articles the last week of December 2008 that inaccurately draw software-market history timelines from which the authors then inaccurately position the place of open source software in the information technology (IT) market. I doubt if the statements are intentionally misleading; they are most likely the result of ignorance or sloppiness.

KDE 4.1 across Linux distributions

Filed under
KDE

reformedmusings.wordpress: I saw some comments on a Linux board recently about KDE 4.1. They said that Kubuntu did a poor job of integrating KDE because Ubuntu with Gnome is the Canonical flagship and that’s where most of the effort goes. That peaked my curiosity.

Speed up Firefox by mounting the profile in tmpfs

Filed under
Linux

tmpfs is a virtual, RAM-backed filesystem. It’s lightning-fast, making tmpfs a viable choice for your profile directory. This document gives some tips on how to mount your Firefox profile in a tmpfs partition while minimizing the downsides of tmpfs.

Blackberry tethering (and more) on Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
MDV
SUSE
Ubuntu

This article explains how to tether a Blackberry phone - use it as a modem, via a USB cable - in Linux, covering Mandriva, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE and Fedora. It also mentions some other things that the Barry project lets you do with your Blackberry.

few odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • tellico: collection manager for books, videos, music, and a whole lot more

  • New Features in GTK+ 2.15.0
  • Giving life back to an OLD laptop
  • Run Compiz Fusion on Your Mini 9
  • small tip - Which applications are using a given directory
  • FLOSS Weekly #50: Open MPI

Resolutions and mean people

Filed under
Linux

castrojo.wordpress: I am going to follow this guy’s saga on switching to Ubuntu for a week. I like his writing style and sarcastic sense of humor. However I found the responses to his problems to be all too common these days.

The For And The Against For Linux

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com/blog: Two responses to things I've written recently are worth commenting on. Both were responses to my post about Windows 7 being more of a previous-version-of-Windows-killer than a Linux-killer -- and both bring up further points to be argued and defended.

7 Reasons Why Pirates Should Jump Ship to Open Source

Filed under
OSS

It has always amazed me how many people pirate. As the well-known anti-piracy video clip says, “You wouldn’t steal a car, you wouldn’t steal a handbag,” but people do regularly steal software and other copyrighted materials. They seem to have an innate belief that software should be free.

Technically, pirates don’t steal - they infringe copyright. Neither do they rape, pillage, sink ships, or make people walk the plank into shark-infested waters. The “pirate” label seems to be part of an unsuccessful campaign to encourage people to pay for intellectual property. Calling people names rarely works.

Btrfs For The Mainline Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: With the 2.6.29 merge window still open, earlier this week he started a new thread entitled Btrfs for mainline.

How To Install Ubuntu Themes

Filed under
HowTos

iarematt.com: One of the first things I did when I moved from Vista to Ubuntu was install a nice looking theme. The default Ubuntu theme is pretty decent, but I dont like the brown and when browsing posts like this and this, I knew I wanted a sexier look for my laptop.

A tale of too many parameters

Filed under
Linux

blog.i-no.de: With 2.6.28 came ext4, which I've been using on several not-so-important filesystems for a while now. I thought I'd kill two birds with one stone and switch back to ext4 on a crypted volume. Shouldn't be all that hard, right?

Amazon MP3 Downloader on openSUSE 11

Filed under
HowTos

tuxtraining.com: This HOWTO will explain how to install the Amazon MP3 Downloader application under openSUSE 11 (both 11.0 and 11.1). Unfortunately, as of this writing, Amazon only provides a package for openSUSE 10.3, which will not work directly with 11.0. But you can get the downloader working under 11 with some manual steps.

Choosing a Distro……..

Filed under
Linux

armageddon08.wordpress: The first step to start using GNU/Linux is to find out which distribution is the right one for you. So how do you go about choosing the right distro for your computer. Let’s find out.

Evolution vs Kontact - Part 2 - Kontact & Conclusion

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: Welcome back to Part 2 of this series - pitting GNOME’s Evolution Personal Information Manager (PIM) suite against KDE’s Kontact.

Fair but honest? Xubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: Xubuntu and I parted ways a long time ago. When I started using Ubuntu, I quickly orphaned my $3000 laptop in favor of a $300 secondhand machine, and Xubuntu became my weapon of choice. A few months ago I promised a fair look at Xubuntu 8.10.

Sylvania Netbook With Ubuntu: A Good Mix

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

linuxinsider.com: Sylvania's G Netbook Meso offers a nice-looking screen and plenty of ports -- you get three USBs as well as a VGA. The available Ubuntu Netbook Remix OS will give you the option to effortless switch between two GUI styles.

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today's leftovers

  • S11E12 – Twelve Years a Slave
    It’s Season 11 Episode 12 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.
  • Porting guide from Qt 1.0 to 5.11
    We do try to keep breakages to a minimum, even in the major releases, but the changes do add up. This raises the question: How hard would it be to port a Qt application from Qt 1.0 to 5.11?
  • Thunderbolt Networking on Linux
    Thunderbolt allows for peer-to-peer network connections by connecting two computers directly via a thunderbolt cable. Mika from Intel added support for this to the 4.15 kernel. Recently, Thomas Haller from NetworkManager and I worked together to figure out what needs to be done in userspace to make it work. As it turns out, it was not that hard and the pull-request was merged swiftly.
  • What’s new in openSUSE Leap 15 – part 1
    openSUSE Leap 15 will be released on the 25th of May 2018! A new openSUSE release is always an exciting event. This means that I get to play with all kinds of new and improved software packages. I am aware that I can simply install openSUSE Tumbleweed and have a new release 4 or 5 times a week. But when using openSUSE Tumbleweed some time ago, I noticed that I was installing Gigabytes of new software packages multiple times per week. The reason for that is that I have the complete opposite of a minimum install. I always install a lot of applications to play / experiment with (including a lot of open source games). I am using openSUSE since 2009 and it covers all of my needs and then some. I am already happy with the available software, so there is no real reason for me to move with the speed of a rolling release. Therefore I prefer to move with the slower pace of the Leap releases.
  • GNOME Terminal: a little something for Fedora 29
    Can you spot what that is?
  • UBports To Work On Unity 8 / Mir / Wayland After OTA-4
    The UBports team have put out their latest batch of answers to common questions around this project that's still working to maintain the Ubuntu Touch software stack. Among the project's recent work has included getting QtWebEngine working on Mir and before their Ubuntu 16.04 LTS based release they still need to figure out Chromium crashes and to resolve that as well as updating the browser. For their first release of UBports derived from Ubuntu 16.04 "Xenial" they are still going to rely upon Oxide while later on should migrate to a new browser.
  • 8 Best App Locks For Android To Secure Your Device In 2018
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 39
  • What's Coming in OpenStack Rocky?
    The OpenStack Rocky release is currently scheduled to become generally available on August 30th, and it's expected to add a host of new and enhanced capabilities to the open-source cloud platform. At the OpenStack Summit here, Anne Bertucio, marketing manager at the OpenStack Foundation, and Pete Chadwick, director of product management at SUSE, outlined some of the features currently on the Rocky roadmap. Bertucio began the session by warning the audience that the roadmap is not prescriptive, but rather is intended to provide a general idea of the direction the next OpenStack release is taking.
  • PostgreSQL 11 Is Continuing With More Performance Improvements, JIT'ing
    PostgreSQL 11 is the next major feature release of this open-source database SQL server due out later in 2018. While it's not out yet, their release notes were recently updated for providing an overview of what's coming as part of this next major update. To little surprise, performance improvements remain a big focus for PostgreSQL 11 with various optimizations as well as continued parallelization work and also the recently introduced just-in-time (JIT) compilation support.
  • Tidelift Secures $15M in Series A Funding
    Tidelift, a Boston, MA-based open source software startup, secured $15m in Series A funding.
  • Tesla disclosed some of its autopilot source code after GPL violation
    Tesla, a technology company, and the independent automaker are well known for offering the safest, quickest electric cars. The company uses a lot of open source software to build its operating system and features, such as Linux Kernel, Buildroot, Busybox, QT, etc also they have always been taciturn about the finer details and tech of its popular artefacts, such as Model S, Model X, but now Elon Musk’s company has just released some of its automotive tech source code into the open source community.
  • Open Source Underwater Distributed Sensor Network
    One way to design an underwater monitoring device is to take inspiration from nature and emulate an underwater creature. [Michael Barton-Sweeney] is making devices in the shape of, and functioning somewhat like, clams for his open source underwater distributed sensor network.
  • Security Researchers Discover Two New Variants of the Spectre Vulnerability
  • Security updates for Thursday

today's howtos

Games and Wine: Hacknet - Deluxe, Full Metal Furies and More